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Improving Adiponectin Levels in Individuals With Diabetes and Obesity: Insights From Look AHEAD.
Diabetes Care 2015; 38(8):1544-50DC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study investigated whether fitness changes resulting from lifestyle interventions for weight loss may independently contribute to the improvement of low adiponectin levels in obese individuals with diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) randomized overweight/obese individuals with type 2 diabetes to intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) for weight loss or to diabetes support and education (DSE). Total and high-molecular weight adiponectin (adiponectins), weight, and cardiorespiratory fitness (submaximal exercise stress test) were measured in 1,397 participants at baseline and at 1 year, when ILI was most intense. Regression analyses examined the associations of 1-year weight and fitness changes with change in adiponectins.

RESULTS

ILI resulted in greater improvements in weight, fitness, and adiponectins at 1 year compared with DSE (P < 0.0001). Weight loss and improved fitness were each associated with changes in adiponectins in men and women (P < 0.001 for all), after adjusting for baseline adiponectins, demographics, clinical variables, and treatment arm. Weight loss contributed an additional 4-5% to the variance of change in adiponectins than did increased fitness in men; in women, the contributions of improved fitness (1% greater) and of weight loss were similar. When weight and fitness changes were both accounted for, weight loss in men and increased fitness in women retained their strong associations (P < 0.0001) with adiponectin change.

CONCLUSIONS

Improvements in fitness and weight with ILI were favorably but distinctly associated with changes in adiponectin levels in overweight/obese men and women with diabetes. Future studies need to investigate whether sex-specific biological determinants contribute to the observed associations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX lmbelalc@utmb.edu.Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.Department of Medicine, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX.College of Nursing & Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ.Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.Department of Medicine, Columbia University, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital, New York, NY.Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT.Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center, Houston, TX.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25972574

Citation

Belalcazar, L Maria, et al. "Improving Adiponectin Levels in Individuals With Diabetes and Obesity: Insights From Look AHEAD." Diabetes Care, vol. 38, no. 8, 2015, pp. 1544-50.
Belalcazar LM, Lang W, Haffner SM, et al. Improving Adiponectin Levels in Individuals With Diabetes and Obesity: Insights From Look AHEAD. Diabetes Care. 2015;38(8):1544-50.
Belalcazar, L. M., Lang, W., Haffner, S. M., Schwenke, D. C., Kriska, A., Balasubramanyam, A., ... Ballantyne, C. M. (2015). Improving Adiponectin Levels in Individuals With Diabetes and Obesity: Insights From Look AHEAD. Diabetes Care, 38(8), pp. 1544-50. doi:10.2337/dc14-2775.
Belalcazar LM, et al. Improving Adiponectin Levels in Individuals With Diabetes and Obesity: Insights From Look AHEAD. Diabetes Care. 2015;38(8):1544-50. PubMed PMID: 25972574.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Improving Adiponectin Levels in Individuals With Diabetes and Obesity: Insights From Look AHEAD. AU - Belalcazar,L Maria, AU - Lang,Wei, AU - Haffner,Steven M, AU - Schwenke,Dawn C, AU - Kriska,Andrea, AU - Balasubramanyam,Ashok, AU - Hoogeveen,Ron C, AU - Pi-Sunyer,F Xavier, AU - Tracy,Russell P, AU - Ballantyne,Christie M, AU - ,, Y1 - 2015/05/13/ PY - 2014/11/23/received PY - 2015/04/20/accepted PY - 2015/5/15/entrez PY - 2015/5/15/pubmed PY - 2016/2/18/medline SP - 1544 EP - 50 JF - Diabetes care JO - Diabetes Care VL - 38 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study investigated whether fitness changes resulting from lifestyle interventions for weight loss may independently contribute to the improvement of low adiponectin levels in obese individuals with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) randomized overweight/obese individuals with type 2 diabetes to intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) for weight loss or to diabetes support and education (DSE). Total and high-molecular weight adiponectin (adiponectins), weight, and cardiorespiratory fitness (submaximal exercise stress test) were measured in 1,397 participants at baseline and at 1 year, when ILI was most intense. Regression analyses examined the associations of 1-year weight and fitness changes with change in adiponectins. RESULTS: ILI resulted in greater improvements in weight, fitness, and adiponectins at 1 year compared with DSE (P < 0.0001). Weight loss and improved fitness were each associated with changes in adiponectins in men and women (P < 0.001 for all), after adjusting for baseline adiponectins, demographics, clinical variables, and treatment arm. Weight loss contributed an additional 4-5% to the variance of change in adiponectins than did increased fitness in men; in women, the contributions of improved fitness (1% greater) and of weight loss were similar. When weight and fitness changes were both accounted for, weight loss in men and increased fitness in women retained their strong associations (P < 0.0001) with adiponectin change. CONCLUSIONS: Improvements in fitness and weight with ILI were favorably but distinctly associated with changes in adiponectin levels in overweight/obese men and women with diabetes. Future studies need to investigate whether sex-specific biological determinants contribute to the observed associations. SN - 1935-5548 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25972574/Improving_Adiponectin_Levels_in_Individuals_With_Diabetes_and_Obesity:_Insights_From_Look_AHEAD_ L2 - http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=25972574 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -