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Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome and allergic proctocolitis.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2015 May-Jun; 36(3):172-84AA

Abstract

Non-IgE-mediated food allergic disorders account for up to 40% of milk protein allergy in infants and young children. We aim to review the recent literature and to provide an update on diagnosis and management of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) and food protein-induced allergic proctocolitis (FPIAP). The peer-reviewed articles indexed in PubMed have been reviewed. FPIES manifests in infants as profuse, repetitive vomiting and lethargy, often with diarrhea, leading to acute dehydration, or weight loss and failure to thrive, in chronic form. FPIES is caused most commonly by cow's milk (CM) and soy proteins; rice, oat, and other solid foods may also trigger FPIES. FPIES rarely occurs in the exclusively breastfed infants. FPIES is underrecognized; children are often mismanaged as having acute viral gastrointestinal illness, sepsis, or surgical disease, delaying diagnosis of FPIES for many months. Approximately 25% of children with FPIES develop food-specific IgE antibodies and some transition to immediate food allergy; IgE positivity is associated with a more protracted course. FPIES is a self-limiting condition, with most cases resolving by age three to five years. Ondansetron may be helpful in managing acute FPIES. FPIAP is a benign condition of bloody stools in a well-appearing infant, with usual onset between one and four weeks of age. Up to 60% of cases occur in exclusively breastfed infants and resolve with maternal elimination of CM and soy proteins. The majority of cases resolve by age 12 months. FPIES may transition to IgE-mediated food allergy in some patients; IgE positivity to the FPIES food is a marker of a more persistent disease. FPIAP is benign and resolves by age 12 months in most patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Jaffe Food Allergy Institute, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Allergy and Immunology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25976434

Citation

Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna. "Food Protein-induced Enterocolitis Syndrome and Allergic Proctocolitis." Allergy and Asthma Proceedings, vol. 36, no. 3, 2015, pp. 172-84.
Nowak-Węgrzyn A. Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome and allergic proctocolitis. Allergy Asthma Proc. 2015;36(3):172-84.
Nowak-Węgrzyn, A. (2015). Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome and allergic proctocolitis. Allergy and Asthma Proceedings, 36(3), pp. 172-84. doi:10.2500/aap.2015.36.3811.
Nowak-Węgrzyn A. Food Protein-induced Enterocolitis Syndrome and Allergic Proctocolitis. Allergy Asthma Proc. 2015;36(3):172-84. PubMed PMID: 25976434.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome and allergic proctocolitis. A1 - Nowak-Węgrzyn,Anna, PY - 2015/5/16/entrez PY - 2015/5/16/pubmed PY - 2016/2/4/medline SP - 172 EP - 84 JF - Allergy and asthma proceedings JO - Allergy Asthma Proc VL - 36 IS - 3 N2 - Non-IgE-mediated food allergic disorders account for up to 40% of milk protein allergy in infants and young children. We aim to review the recent literature and to provide an update on diagnosis and management of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) and food protein-induced allergic proctocolitis (FPIAP). The peer-reviewed articles indexed in PubMed have been reviewed. FPIES manifests in infants as profuse, repetitive vomiting and lethargy, often with diarrhea, leading to acute dehydration, or weight loss and failure to thrive, in chronic form. FPIES is caused most commonly by cow's milk (CM) and soy proteins; rice, oat, and other solid foods may also trigger FPIES. FPIES rarely occurs in the exclusively breastfed infants. FPIES is underrecognized; children are often mismanaged as having acute viral gastrointestinal illness, sepsis, or surgical disease, delaying diagnosis of FPIES for many months. Approximately 25% of children with FPIES develop food-specific IgE antibodies and some transition to immediate food allergy; IgE positivity is associated with a more protracted course. FPIES is a self-limiting condition, with most cases resolving by age three to five years. Ondansetron may be helpful in managing acute FPIES. FPIAP is a benign condition of bloody stools in a well-appearing infant, with usual onset between one and four weeks of age. Up to 60% of cases occur in exclusively breastfed infants and resolve with maternal elimination of CM and soy proteins. The majority of cases resolve by age 12 months. FPIES may transition to IgE-mediated food allergy in some patients; IgE positivity to the FPIES food is a marker of a more persistent disease. FPIAP is benign and resolves by age 12 months in most patients. SN - 1539-6304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25976434/Food_protein_induced_enterocolitis_syndrome_and_allergic_proctocolitis_ L2 - https://www.ingentaconnect.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1088-5412&volume=36&issue=3&spage=172&aulast=Nowak-Węgrzyn DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -