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Coffee Consumption, Newly Diagnosed Diabetes, and Other Alterations in Glucose Homeostasis: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).
PLoS One 2015; 10(5):e0126469Plos

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Observational studies have reported fairly consistent inverse associations between coffee consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes, but this association has been little investigated with regard to lesser degrees of hyperglycemia and other alterations in glucose homeostasis. Additionally, the association between coffee consumption and diabetes has been rarely investigated in South American populations. We examined the cross-sectional relationships of coffee intake with newly diagnosed diabetes and measures of glucose homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion, in a large Brazilian cohort of middle-aged and elderly individuals.

METHODS

We used baseline data from 12,586 participants of the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Logistic regression analyses were performed to examine associations between coffee consumption and newly diagnosed diabetes. Analysis of covariance was used to assess coffee intake in relation to two-hour glucose from an oral glucose tolerance test, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, fasting and -2-hour postload insulin and measures of insulin sensitivity.

RESULTS

We found an inverse association between coffee consumption and newly diagnosed diabetes, after adjusting for multiple covariates [23% and 26% lower odds of diabetes for those consuming coffee 2-3 and >3 times per day, respectively, compared to those reporting never or almost never consuming coffee, (p = .02)]. An inverse association was also found for 2-hour postload glucose [Never/almost never: 7.57 mmol/L, ≤1 time/day: 7.48 mmol/L, 2-3 times/day: 7.22 mmol/L, >3 times/day: 7.12 mol/L, p<0.0001] but not with fasting glucose concentrations (p = 0.07). Coffee was additionally associated with 2-hour postload insulin [Never/almost never: 287.2 pmol/L, ≤1 time/day: 280.1 pmol/L, 2-3 times/day: 275.3 pmol/L, >3 times/day: 262.2 pmol/L, p = 0.0005) but not with fasting insulin concentrations (p = .58).

CONCLUSION

Our present study provides further evidence of a protective effect of coffee on risk of adult-onset diabetes. This effect appears to act primarily, if not exclusively, through postprandial, as opposed to fasting, glucose homeostasis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Postgraduate Studies Program in Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.Postgraduate Studies Program in Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, United States of America; Institute of Human Nutrition and Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, United States of America.Postgraduate Studies Program in Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.Center for Health Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitória, Espírito Santo, Brazil.Center for Clinical and Epidemiological Research, Hospital Universitário, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.Postgraduate Studies Program in Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25978631

Citation

Yarmolinsky, James, et al. "Coffee Consumption, Newly Diagnosed Diabetes, and Other Alterations in Glucose Homeostasis: a Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)." PloS One, vol. 10, no. 5, 2015, pp. e0126469.
Yarmolinsky J, Mueller NT, Duncan BB, et al. Coffee Consumption, Newly Diagnosed Diabetes, and Other Alterations in Glucose Homeostasis: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). PLoS ONE. 2015;10(5):e0126469.
Yarmolinsky, J., Mueller, N. T., Duncan, B. B., Bisi Molina, M. d. e. l. . C., Goulart, A. C., & Schmidt, M. I. (2015). Coffee Consumption, Newly Diagnosed Diabetes, and Other Alterations in Glucose Homeostasis: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). PloS One, 10(5), pp. e0126469. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0126469.
Yarmolinsky J, et al. Coffee Consumption, Newly Diagnosed Diabetes, and Other Alterations in Glucose Homeostasis: a Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). PLoS ONE. 2015;10(5):e0126469. PubMed PMID: 25978631.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coffee Consumption, Newly Diagnosed Diabetes, and Other Alterations in Glucose Homeostasis: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). AU - Yarmolinsky,James, AU - Mueller,Noel T, AU - Duncan,Bruce B, AU - Bisi Molina,Maria Del Carmen, AU - Goulart,Alessandra C, AU - Schmidt,Maria Inês, Y1 - 2015/05/15/ PY - 2014/12/17/received PY - 2015/04/02/accepted PY - 2015/5/16/entrez PY - 2015/5/16/pubmed PY - 2016/4/19/medline SP - e0126469 EP - e0126469 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 10 IS - 5 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Observational studies have reported fairly consistent inverse associations between coffee consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes, but this association has been little investigated with regard to lesser degrees of hyperglycemia and other alterations in glucose homeostasis. Additionally, the association between coffee consumption and diabetes has been rarely investigated in South American populations. We examined the cross-sectional relationships of coffee intake with newly diagnosed diabetes and measures of glucose homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion, in a large Brazilian cohort of middle-aged and elderly individuals. METHODS: We used baseline data from 12,586 participants of the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Logistic regression analyses were performed to examine associations between coffee consumption and newly diagnosed diabetes. Analysis of covariance was used to assess coffee intake in relation to two-hour glucose from an oral glucose tolerance test, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, fasting and -2-hour postload insulin and measures of insulin sensitivity. RESULTS: We found an inverse association between coffee consumption and newly diagnosed diabetes, after adjusting for multiple covariates [23% and 26% lower odds of diabetes for those consuming coffee 2-3 and >3 times per day, respectively, compared to those reporting never or almost never consuming coffee, (p = .02)]. An inverse association was also found for 2-hour postload glucose [Never/almost never: 7.57 mmol/L, ≤1 time/day: 7.48 mmol/L, 2-3 times/day: 7.22 mmol/L, >3 times/day: 7.12 mol/L, p<0.0001] but not with fasting glucose concentrations (p = 0.07). Coffee was additionally associated with 2-hour postload insulin [Never/almost never: 287.2 pmol/L, ≤1 time/day: 280.1 pmol/L, 2-3 times/day: 275.3 pmol/L, >3 times/day: 262.2 pmol/L, p = 0.0005) but not with fasting insulin concentrations (p = .58). CONCLUSION: Our present study provides further evidence of a protective effect of coffee on risk of adult-onset diabetes. This effect appears to act primarily, if not exclusively, through postprandial, as opposed to fasting, glucose homeostasis. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25978631/Coffee_Consumption_Newly_Diagnosed_Diabetes_and_Other_Alterations_in_Glucose_Homeostasis:_A_Cross_Sectional_Analysis_of_the_Longitudinal_Study_of_Adult_Health__ELSA_Brasil__ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0126469 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -