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How can intergroup interaction be bad if intergroup contact is good? Exploring and reconciling an apparent paradox in the science of intergroup relations.
Perspect Psychol Sci 2015; 10(3):307-27PP

Abstract

The outcomes of social interactions among members of different groups (e.g., racial groups, political groups, sexual orientation groups) have long been of interest to psychologists. Two related literatures on the topic have emerged-the intergroup interaction literature and the intergroup contact literature-in which divergent conclusions have been reported. Intergroup interaction is typically found to have negative effects tied to intergroup bias, producing heightened stress, intergroup anxiety, or outgroup avoidance, whereas intergroup contact is typically found to have positive effects tied to intergroup bias, predicting lower intergroup anxiety and lower prejudice. We examine these paradoxical findings, proposing that researchers contributing to the two literatures are examining different levels of the same phenomenon and that methodological differences can account for the divide between the literatures. Further, we introduce a mathematical model by which the findings of the two literatures can be reconciled. We believe that adopting this model will streamline thinking in the field and will generate integrative new research in which investigators examine how a person's experiences with diversity unfold.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Toronto cara.macinnis@utoronto.ca.University of Toronto.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25987510

Citation

MacInnis, Cara C., and Elizabeth Page-Gould. "How Can Intergroup Interaction Be Bad if Intergroup Contact Is Good? Exploring and Reconciling an Apparent Paradox in the Science of Intergroup Relations." Perspectives On Psychological Science : a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science, vol. 10, no. 3, 2015, pp. 307-27.
MacInnis CC, Page-Gould E. How can intergroup interaction be bad if intergroup contact is good? Exploring and reconciling an apparent paradox in the science of intergroup relations. Perspect Psychol Sci. 2015;10(3):307-27.
MacInnis, C. C., & Page-Gould, E. (2015). How can intergroup interaction be bad if intergroup contact is good? Exploring and reconciling an apparent paradox in the science of intergroup relations. Perspectives On Psychological Science : a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science, 10(3), pp. 307-27. doi:10.1177/1745691614568482.
MacInnis CC, Page-Gould E. How Can Intergroup Interaction Be Bad if Intergroup Contact Is Good? Exploring and Reconciling an Apparent Paradox in the Science of Intergroup Relations. Perspect Psychol Sci. 2015;10(3):307-27. PubMed PMID: 25987510.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - How can intergroup interaction be bad if intergroup contact is good? Exploring and reconciling an apparent paradox in the science of intergroup relations. AU - MacInnis,Cara C, AU - Page-Gould,Elizabeth, PY - 2015/5/20/entrez PY - 2015/5/20/pubmed PY - 2017/1/11/medline KW - contact threshold KW - intergroup bias KW - intergroup contact KW - intergroup interaction KW - prejudice SP - 307 EP - 27 JF - Perspectives on psychological science : a journal of the Association for Psychological Science JO - Perspect Psychol Sci VL - 10 IS - 3 N2 - The outcomes of social interactions among members of different groups (e.g., racial groups, political groups, sexual orientation groups) have long been of interest to psychologists. Two related literatures on the topic have emerged-the intergroup interaction literature and the intergroup contact literature-in which divergent conclusions have been reported. Intergroup interaction is typically found to have negative effects tied to intergroup bias, producing heightened stress, intergroup anxiety, or outgroup avoidance, whereas intergroup contact is typically found to have positive effects tied to intergroup bias, predicting lower intergroup anxiety and lower prejudice. We examine these paradoxical findings, proposing that researchers contributing to the two literatures are examining different levels of the same phenomenon and that methodological differences can account for the divide between the literatures. Further, we introduce a mathematical model by which the findings of the two literatures can be reconciled. We believe that adopting this model will streamline thinking in the field and will generate integrative new research in which investigators examine how a person's experiences with diversity unfold. SN - 1745-6924 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25987510/How_can_intergroup_interaction_be_bad_if_intergroup_contact_is_good_Exploring_and_reconciling_an_apparent_paradox_in_the_science_of_intergroup_relations_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1745691614568482?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -