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Relation of peer effects and school climate to substance use among Asian American adolescents.
J Adolesc. 2015 Jul; 42:115-27.JA

Abstract

Using a nationally representative, longitudinal sample of Asian American late adolescents/young adults (ages 18-26), this article investigates the link between peer effects, school climate, on the one hand, and substance use, which includes tobacco, alcohol, and other illicit mood altering substance. The sample (N = 1585) is drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Waves I and III). The study is set to empirically test premises of generational, social capital and stage-environment fit theories. The exploratory variables include individual-level (immigrant generation status, ethnic origin, co-ethnic and co-generational peers - peers from the same immigrant generation) as well as school-level measures (average school socio-economic status and school climate). Multilevel modeling (logistic and negative binomial regression) was used to estimate substance use. Results indicate that preference for co-generational friends is inversely associated with frequency of cannabis and other illicit drug use and preference for co-ethnic peers is inversely associated with other illicit drug use. We also find that school climate is a strong and negative predictor of frequency of cannabis and other illicit drug use as well as of heavy episodic drinking. In terms of policy, these findings suggest that Asian American students should benefit from co-ethnic and co-generational peer networks in schools and, above all, from improving school climate.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Sociology and Anthropology, The University of Texas-Pan American, 1201 W. University Drive, Edinburg, TX, 78539-2999, USA. Electronic address: ryabovi@utpa.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25996088

Citation

Ryabov, Igor. "Relation of Peer Effects and School Climate to Substance Use Among Asian American Adolescents." Journal of Adolescence, vol. 42, 2015, pp. 115-27.
Ryabov I. Relation of peer effects and school climate to substance use among Asian American adolescents. J Adolesc. 2015;42:115-27.
Ryabov, I. (2015). Relation of peer effects and school climate to substance use among Asian American adolescents. Journal of Adolescence, 42, 115-27. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2015.04.007
Ryabov I. Relation of Peer Effects and School Climate to Substance Use Among Asian American Adolescents. J Adolesc. 2015;42:115-27. PubMed PMID: 25996088.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relation of peer effects and school climate to substance use among Asian American adolescents. A1 - Ryabov,Igor, Y1 - 2015/05/18/ PY - 2014/10/22/received PY - 2015/04/28/revised PY - 2015/04/29/accepted PY - 2015/5/22/entrez PY - 2015/5/23/pubmed PY - 2016/3/2/medline KW - Asian Americans KW - Heavy episodic drinking KW - Illicit drug use KW - Immigrant generation KW - School climate SP - 115 EP - 27 JF - Journal of adolescence JO - J Adolesc VL - 42 N2 - Using a nationally representative, longitudinal sample of Asian American late adolescents/young adults (ages 18-26), this article investigates the link between peer effects, school climate, on the one hand, and substance use, which includes tobacco, alcohol, and other illicit mood altering substance. The sample (N = 1585) is drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Waves I and III). The study is set to empirically test premises of generational, social capital and stage-environment fit theories. The exploratory variables include individual-level (immigrant generation status, ethnic origin, co-ethnic and co-generational peers - peers from the same immigrant generation) as well as school-level measures (average school socio-economic status and school climate). Multilevel modeling (logistic and negative binomial regression) was used to estimate substance use. Results indicate that preference for co-generational friends is inversely associated with frequency of cannabis and other illicit drug use and preference for co-ethnic peers is inversely associated with other illicit drug use. We also find that school climate is a strong and negative predictor of frequency of cannabis and other illicit drug use as well as of heavy episodic drinking. In terms of policy, these findings suggest that Asian American students should benefit from co-ethnic and co-generational peer networks in schools and, above all, from improving school climate. SN - 1095-9254 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25996088/Relation_of_peer_effects_and_school_climate_to_substance_use_among_Asian_American_adolescents_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0140-1971(15)00093-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -