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Tea Consumption and Endometrial Cancer Risk: Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

Abstract

Several lines of evidence suggest that tea consumption may reduce the risk of endometrial cancer due to antioxidant properties of tea, but the results of prospective data to date are inconsistent. We thus conducted a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to examine the relationship between tea consumption and endometrial cancer risk, using a random-effects model. We identified 5 eligible cohort studies, which included 231,870 female participants and 1831 cases for endometrial cancer. The pooled relative risk (RR) for the highest (median 2 cups/day) vs. no/lowest category of tea consumption on endometrial cancer risk was 0.95 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.80-1.12] with no significant heterogeneity (P for heterogeneity = 0.68, I(2) = 0.0%). By country of origin, the pooled RR of 3 studies conducted in the United States was 1.00 (95% CI: 0.83-1.21), in which black tea was consumed by most people. Because of limited data on Asian population, the association of green tea on endometrial cancer was not calculated separately. There was no indication of publication bias (Begg's P = 0.46; Egger's P = 0.43). Our findings from prospective data do not support a role of tea consumption in endometrial carcinogenesis. More prospective cohort studies with green tea consumption should be conducted.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    a Department of Food and Nutrition , Kyung Hee University , Seoul , South Korea.

    Source

    Nutrition and cancer 67:5 2015 pg 825-30

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Beverages
    Camellia sinensis
    Endometrial Neoplasms
    Female
    Humans
    Middle Aged
    Prospective Studies
    Risk
    Tea

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25996185

    Citation

    Je, Youjin, and Taeyoung Park. "Tea Consumption and Endometrial Cancer Risk: Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies." Nutrition and Cancer, vol. 67, no. 5, 2015, pp. 825-30.
    Je Y, Park T. Tea Consumption and Endometrial Cancer Risk: Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. Nutr Cancer. 2015;67(5):825-30.
    Je, Y., & Park, T. (2015). Tea Consumption and Endometrial Cancer Risk: Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. Nutrition and Cancer, 67(5), pp. 825-30. doi:10.1080/01635581.2015.1040521.
    Je Y, Park T. Tea Consumption and Endometrial Cancer Risk: Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. Nutr Cancer. 2015;67(5):825-30. PubMed PMID: 25996185.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Tea Consumption and Endometrial Cancer Risk: Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. AU - Je,Youjin, AU - Park,Taeyoung, Y1 - 2015/05/21/ PY - 2015/5/22/entrez PY - 2015/5/23/pubmed PY - 2016/5/4/medline SP - 825 EP - 30 JF - Nutrition and cancer JO - Nutr Cancer VL - 67 IS - 5 N2 - Several lines of evidence suggest that tea consumption may reduce the risk of endometrial cancer due to antioxidant properties of tea, but the results of prospective data to date are inconsistent. We thus conducted a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to examine the relationship between tea consumption and endometrial cancer risk, using a random-effects model. We identified 5 eligible cohort studies, which included 231,870 female participants and 1831 cases for endometrial cancer. The pooled relative risk (RR) for the highest (median 2 cups/day) vs. no/lowest category of tea consumption on endometrial cancer risk was 0.95 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.80-1.12] with no significant heterogeneity (P for heterogeneity = 0.68, I(2) = 0.0%). By country of origin, the pooled RR of 3 studies conducted in the United States was 1.00 (95% CI: 0.83-1.21), in which black tea was consumed by most people. Because of limited data on Asian population, the association of green tea on endometrial cancer was not calculated separately. There was no indication of publication bias (Begg's P = 0.46; Egger's P = 0.43). Our findings from prospective data do not support a role of tea consumption in endometrial carcinogenesis. More prospective cohort studies with green tea consumption should be conducted. SN - 1532-7914 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25996185/Tea_Consumption_and_Endometrial_Cancer_Risk:_Meta_Analysis_of_Prospective_Cohort_Studies_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01635581.2015.1040521 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -