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Virulence factors and mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance in Shigella strains from periurban areas of Lima (Peru).
Int J Med Microbiol 2015 Jun-Aug; 305(4-5):480-90IJ

Abstract

The study was aimed to describe the serotype, mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance, and virulence determinants in Shigella spp. isolated from Peruvian children. Eighty three Shigella spp. were serogrouped and serotyped being established the antibiotic susceptibility. The presence of 12 virulence factors (VF) and integrase 1 and 2, along with commonly found antibiotic resistance genes was established by PCR. S. flexneri was the most relevant serogroup (55 isolates, 66%), with serotype 2a most frequently detected (27 of 55, 49%), followed by S. boydii and S. sonnei at 12 isolates each (14%) and S. dysenteriae (four isolates, 5%). Fifty isolates (60%) were multi-drug resistant (MDR) including 100% of S. sonnei and 64% of S. flexneri. Resistance levels were high to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (86%), tetracycline (74%), ampicillin (67%), and chloramphenicol (65%). Six isolates showed decreased azithromycin susceptibility. No isolate was resistant to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, or ceftriaxone. The most frequent resistance genes were sul2 (95%), tet(B) (92%), cat (80%), dfrA1 (47%), blaOXA-1like (40%), with intl1 and intl2 detected in 51 and 52% of the isolates, respectively. Thirty-one different VF profiles were observed, being the ipaH (100%), sen (77%), virA and icsA (75%) genes the most frequently found. Differences in the prevalence of VF were observed between species with S. flexneri isolates, particularly serotype 2a, possessing high numbers of VF. In conclusion, this study highlights the high heterogeneity of Shigella VF and resistance genes, and prevalence of MDR organisms within this geographic region.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Instituto de Medicina Tropical Alexander Von Humboldt, Lima, Peru.Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Instituto de Medicina Tropical Alexander Von Humboldt, Lima, Peru.ISGlobal, Barcelona Ctr. Int. Health Res. (CRESIB), Hospital Clínic - Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Instituto de Medicina Tropical Alexander Von Humboldt, Lima, Peru.Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Instituto de Medicina Tropical Alexander Von Humboldt, Lima, Peru.U.S Naval Medical Research Unit No.6, Callao, Peru.U.S Naval Medical Research Unit No.6, Callao, Peru.Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Instituto de Medicina Tropical Alexander Von Humboldt, Lima, Peru.Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Instituto de Medicina Tropical Alexander Von Humboldt, Lima, Peru; Center for Infectious Disease, University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston, USA. Electronic address: Theresa.J.Ochoa@uth.tmc.edu.ISGlobal, Barcelona Ctr. Int. Health Res. (CRESIB), Hospital Clínic - Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: joruiz@clinic.ub.es.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25998616

Citation

Lluque, Angela, et al. "Virulence Factors and Mechanisms of Antimicrobial Resistance in Shigella Strains From Periurban Areas of Lima (Peru)." International Journal of Medical Microbiology : IJMM, vol. 305, no. 4-5, 2015, pp. 480-90.
Lluque A, Mosquito S, Gomes C, et al. Virulence factors and mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance in Shigella strains from periurban areas of Lima (Peru). Int J Med Microbiol. 2015;305(4-5):480-90.
Lluque, A., Mosquito, S., Gomes, C., Riveros, M., Durand, D., Tilley, D. H., ... Ruiz, J. (2015). Virulence factors and mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance in Shigella strains from periurban areas of Lima (Peru). International Journal of Medical Microbiology : IJMM, 305(4-5), pp. 480-90. doi:10.1016/j.ijmm.2015.04.005.
Lluque A, et al. Virulence Factors and Mechanisms of Antimicrobial Resistance in Shigella Strains From Periurban Areas of Lima (Peru). Int J Med Microbiol. 2015;305(4-5):480-90. PubMed PMID: 25998616.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Virulence factors and mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance in Shigella strains from periurban areas of Lima (Peru). AU - Lluque,Angela, AU - Mosquito,Susan, AU - Gomes,Cláudia, AU - Riveros,Maribel, AU - Durand,David, AU - Tilley,Drake H, AU - Bernal,María, AU - Prada,Ana, AU - Ochoa,Theresa J, AU - Ruiz,Joaquim, Y1 - 2015/05/04/ PY - 2014/10/25/received PY - 2015/04/22/revised PY - 2015/04/28/accepted PY - 2015/5/23/entrez PY - 2015/5/23/pubmed PY - 2016/2/26/medline KW - Antimicrobial resistance KW - Autotransporters KW - Enterotoxins KW - Ipa KW - Shigella serotypes KW - Shigellosis SP - 480 EP - 90 JF - International journal of medical microbiology : IJMM JO - Int. J. Med. Microbiol. VL - 305 IS - 4-5 N2 - The study was aimed to describe the serotype, mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance, and virulence determinants in Shigella spp. isolated from Peruvian children. Eighty three Shigella spp. were serogrouped and serotyped being established the antibiotic susceptibility. The presence of 12 virulence factors (VF) and integrase 1 and 2, along with commonly found antibiotic resistance genes was established by PCR. S. flexneri was the most relevant serogroup (55 isolates, 66%), with serotype 2a most frequently detected (27 of 55, 49%), followed by S. boydii and S. sonnei at 12 isolates each (14%) and S. dysenteriae (four isolates, 5%). Fifty isolates (60%) were multi-drug resistant (MDR) including 100% of S. sonnei and 64% of S. flexneri. Resistance levels were high to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (86%), tetracycline (74%), ampicillin (67%), and chloramphenicol (65%). Six isolates showed decreased azithromycin susceptibility. No isolate was resistant to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, or ceftriaxone. The most frequent resistance genes were sul2 (95%), tet(B) (92%), cat (80%), dfrA1 (47%), blaOXA-1like (40%), with intl1 and intl2 detected in 51 and 52% of the isolates, respectively. Thirty-one different VF profiles were observed, being the ipaH (100%), sen (77%), virA and icsA (75%) genes the most frequently found. Differences in the prevalence of VF were observed between species with S. flexneri isolates, particularly serotype 2a, possessing high numbers of VF. In conclusion, this study highlights the high heterogeneity of Shigella VF and resistance genes, and prevalence of MDR organisms within this geographic region. SN - 1618-0607 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25998616/Virulence_factors_and_mechanisms_of_antimicrobial_resistance_in_Shigella_strains_from_periurban_areas_of_Lima__Peru__ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1438-4221(15)00041-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -