Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Smoking-cessation advice to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the critical roles of health insurance and source of care.
Am J Prev Med. 2015 Jun; 48(6):683-93.AJ

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Smoking cessation is the most effective therapeutic intervention for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. However, the proportion of smokers with COPD who have received physician advice to quit smoking is unknown. The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence of receipt of smoking-cessation advice among adults with COPD and explore factors predicting advice receipt.

METHODS

This study employed nationally representative data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), collected in 2008-2011 on adults aged ≥20 years. Logistic regression models were conducted to estimate the likelihood of receiving provider advice. Data were analyzed in 2014.

RESULTS

Four percent (95% CI=3.8%, 4.2%) of adults reported being diagnosed with COPD. Among them, 38.5% (95% CI=36.1%, 40.8%) were current smokers. Among those who had seen a physician in the past year, 85.6% (95% CI=83.1%, 88.0%) were advised to quit smoking. Logistic regression revealed negative associations between receipt of smoking-cessation advice and having fewer healthcare visits (AOR=0.41, 95% CI=0.23, 0.72); being uninsured (AOR=0.43, 95% CI=0.22, 0.83); having no usual source of care (AOR=0.39, 95% CI=0.19, 0.80); and having no comorbid chronic diseases (AOR=0.50, 95% CI=0.29, 0.85).

CONCLUSIONS

Having no usual source of care and no health insurance are major barriers to receiving smoking-cessation advice among patients with COPD. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has the potential to increase advice receipt in this high-risk population by expanding health insurance coverage and increasing the number of people with a usual source of care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Behavioral and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. Electronic address: ttilert@umd.edu.Department of Health Services Administration, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25998920

Citation

Tilert, Timothy J., and Jie Chen. "Smoking-cessation Advice to Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: the Critical Roles of Health Insurance and Source of Care." American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 48, no. 6, 2015, pp. 683-93.
Tilert TJ, Chen J. Smoking-cessation advice to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the critical roles of health insurance and source of care. Am J Prev Med. 2015;48(6):683-93.
Tilert, T. J., & Chen, J. (2015). Smoking-cessation advice to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the critical roles of health insurance and source of care. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 48(6), 683-93. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2014.11.016
Tilert TJ, Chen J. Smoking-cessation Advice to Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: the Critical Roles of Health Insurance and Source of Care. Am J Prev Med. 2015;48(6):683-93. PubMed PMID: 25998920.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Smoking-cessation advice to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the critical roles of health insurance and source of care. AU - Tilert,Timothy J, AU - Chen,Jie, PY - 2014/07/30/received PY - 2014/11/18/revised PY - 2014/11/26/accepted PY - 2015/5/23/entrez PY - 2015/5/23/pubmed PY - 2016/10/7/medline SP - 683 EP - 93 JF - American journal of preventive medicine JO - Am J Prev Med VL - 48 IS - 6 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Smoking cessation is the most effective therapeutic intervention for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. However, the proportion of smokers with COPD who have received physician advice to quit smoking is unknown. The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence of receipt of smoking-cessation advice among adults with COPD and explore factors predicting advice receipt. METHODS: This study employed nationally representative data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), collected in 2008-2011 on adults aged ≥20 years. Logistic regression models were conducted to estimate the likelihood of receiving provider advice. Data were analyzed in 2014. RESULTS: Four percent (95% CI=3.8%, 4.2%) of adults reported being diagnosed with COPD. Among them, 38.5% (95% CI=36.1%, 40.8%) were current smokers. Among those who had seen a physician in the past year, 85.6% (95% CI=83.1%, 88.0%) were advised to quit smoking. Logistic regression revealed negative associations between receipt of smoking-cessation advice and having fewer healthcare visits (AOR=0.41, 95% CI=0.23, 0.72); being uninsured (AOR=0.43, 95% CI=0.22, 0.83); having no usual source of care (AOR=0.39, 95% CI=0.19, 0.80); and having no comorbid chronic diseases (AOR=0.50, 95% CI=0.29, 0.85). CONCLUSIONS: Having no usual source of care and no health insurance are major barriers to receiving smoking-cessation advice among patients with COPD. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has the potential to increase advice receipt in this high-risk population by expanding health insurance coverage and increasing the number of people with a usual source of care. SN - 1873-2607 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25998920/Smoking_cessation_advice_to_patients_with_chronic_obstructive_pulmonary_disease:_the_critical_roles_of_health_insurance_and_source_of_care_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -