Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Response surface methodology toward the optimization of high-energy carotenoid extraction from Aristeus antennatus shrimp.
Anal Chim Acta. 2015 Jun 02; 877:100-10.AC

Abstract

High-energy assisted extraction techniques, like ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE) and microwave assisted extraction (MAE), are widely applied over the last years for the recovery of bioactive compounds such as carotenoids, antioxidants and phenols from foods, animals and herbal natural sources. Especially for the case of xanthophylls, the main carotenoid group of crustaceans, they can be extracted in a rapid and quantitative way with the use of UAE and MAE. Response surface methodology (RSM) is used for the optimization of extraction methodologies, also being applied to optimize high energy techniques. Three independent variables, namely extraction time, ultrasound or microwave power and solvent/material ratio, were investigated for both methods by employing a 16-run three-level Box-Behnken design (BBD). Considering the extraction efficiency for carotenoids from Aristeus antennatus shrimp, the selected conditions for UAE were 5 min, 600 W and 10:1 mL g(-1). Acetone was the solvent of choice for the extraction procedure. For MAE, the best experimental values were 7 min, 30 W and 20:1 mL g(-1) using n-hexane:acetone:ethanol 2:1:1 (v/v/v) as extraction solvent. The determination of total carotenoid yield was carried out using the spectophotometric calibration curve (A=0.1646(±0.0061)C-0.005(±0.022), R(2)=0.996, n=3) of a standard mix solution of canthaxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein at 452.1 nm. Under the selected conditions, the yield of total carotenoids for UAE was 23.4(±2.3) and 6.73(±0.56) mg of carotenoids per 100 g dry sample for the head and the body of shrimp, while for MAE was 23.92(±0.63) and 13.3(±1.1) mg of carotenoids per 100g dry sample, respectively. The recovery of both methods was calculated between 60 and 105%. The results indicate that high-energy extraction techniques are faster, less laborious, more repeatable and reproducible methods than the conventional approaches for the quantitative recovery of sensitive bioactive compounds. Moreover, the recovery of a high-added value group of bioactive molecules from natural sources, such as carotenoids, can constitute a profitable and valuable commercial alternative, as these compounds can be used as dietary supplements, food color enhancers and additives in animal feeds, functional foods, preservatives, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis Zografou, 15771 Athens, Greece; Institute of Biology, Medicinal Chemistry & Biotechnology, National Hellenic Research Foundation, 48, Vassileos Constantinou Avenue, 11635 Athens, Greece; Instrumental Food Analysis Laboratory, Department of Food Technology, Technological Educational Institution of Athens, Agiou Spyridonos, 12210 Egaleo, Greece.Institute of Biology, Medicinal Chemistry & Biotechnology, National Hellenic Research Foundation, 48, Vassileos Constantinou Avenue, 11635 Athens, Greece. Electronic address: pzoump@eie.gr.Instrumental Food Analysis Laboratory, Department of Food Technology, Technological Educational Institution of Athens, Agiou Spyridonos, 12210 Egaleo, Greece. Electronic address: vsina@teiath.gr.Instrumental Food Analysis Laboratory, Department of Food Technology, Technological Educational Institution of Athens, Agiou Spyridonos, 12210 Egaleo, Greece.Institute of Biology, Medicinal Chemistry & Biotechnology, National Hellenic Research Foundation, 48, Vassileos Constantinou Avenue, 11635 Athens, Greece.Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis Zografou, 15771 Athens, Greece.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26002215

Citation

Tsiaka, Thalia, et al. "Response Surface Methodology Toward the Optimization of High-energy Carotenoid Extraction From Aristeus Antennatus Shrimp." Analytica Chimica Acta, vol. 877, 2015, pp. 100-10.
Tsiaka T, Zoumpoulakis P, Sinanoglou VJ, et al. Response surface methodology toward the optimization of high-energy carotenoid extraction from Aristeus antennatus shrimp. Anal Chim Acta. 2015;877:100-10.
Tsiaka, T., Zoumpoulakis, P., Sinanoglou, V. J., Makris, C., Heropoulos, G. A., & Calokerinos, A. C. (2015). Response surface methodology toward the optimization of high-energy carotenoid extraction from Aristeus antennatus shrimp. Analytica Chimica Acta, 877, 100-10. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aca.2015.03.051
Tsiaka T, et al. Response Surface Methodology Toward the Optimization of High-energy Carotenoid Extraction From Aristeus Antennatus Shrimp. Anal Chim Acta. 2015 Jun 2;877:100-10. PubMed PMID: 26002215.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Response surface methodology toward the optimization of high-energy carotenoid extraction from Aristeus antennatus shrimp. AU - Tsiaka,Thalia, AU - Zoumpoulakis,Panagiotis, AU - Sinanoglou,Vassilia J, AU - Makris,Constantinos, AU - Heropoulos,Georgios A, AU - Calokerinos,Antony C, Y1 - 2015/04/02/ PY - 2015/01/30/received PY - 2015/03/28/accepted PY - 2015/5/24/entrez PY - 2015/5/24/pubmed PY - 2016/2/13/medline KW - Box–Behnken design KW - Carotenoids KW - Microwave-assisted extraction KW - Response surface methodology KW - Ultrasound-assisted extraction SP - 100 EP - 10 JF - Analytica chimica acta JO - Anal Chim Acta VL - 877 N2 - High-energy assisted extraction techniques, like ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE) and microwave assisted extraction (MAE), are widely applied over the last years for the recovery of bioactive compounds such as carotenoids, antioxidants and phenols from foods, animals and herbal natural sources. Especially for the case of xanthophylls, the main carotenoid group of crustaceans, they can be extracted in a rapid and quantitative way with the use of UAE and MAE. Response surface methodology (RSM) is used for the optimization of extraction methodologies, also being applied to optimize high energy techniques. Three independent variables, namely extraction time, ultrasound or microwave power and solvent/material ratio, were investigated for both methods by employing a 16-run three-level Box-Behnken design (BBD). Considering the extraction efficiency for carotenoids from Aristeus antennatus shrimp, the selected conditions for UAE were 5 min, 600 W and 10:1 mL g(-1). Acetone was the solvent of choice for the extraction procedure. For MAE, the best experimental values were 7 min, 30 W and 20:1 mL g(-1) using n-hexane:acetone:ethanol 2:1:1 (v/v/v) as extraction solvent. The determination of total carotenoid yield was carried out using the spectophotometric calibration curve (A=0.1646(±0.0061)C-0.005(±0.022), R(2)=0.996, n=3) of a standard mix solution of canthaxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein at 452.1 nm. Under the selected conditions, the yield of total carotenoids for UAE was 23.4(±2.3) and 6.73(±0.56) mg of carotenoids per 100 g dry sample for the head and the body of shrimp, while for MAE was 23.92(±0.63) and 13.3(±1.1) mg of carotenoids per 100g dry sample, respectively. The recovery of both methods was calculated between 60 and 105%. The results indicate that high-energy extraction techniques are faster, less laborious, more repeatable and reproducible methods than the conventional approaches for the quantitative recovery of sensitive bioactive compounds. Moreover, the recovery of a high-added value group of bioactive molecules from natural sources, such as carotenoids, can constitute a profitable and valuable commercial alternative, as these compounds can be used as dietary supplements, food color enhancers and additives in animal feeds, functional foods, preservatives, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. SN - 1873-4324 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26002215/Response_surface_methodology_toward_the_optimization_of_high_energy_carotenoid_extraction_from_Aristeus_antennatus_shrimp_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -