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Extensive in vitro gastrointestinal digestion markedly reduces the immune-toxicity of Triticum monococcum wheat: implication for celiac disease.
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2015 Sep; 59(9):1844-54.MN

Abstract

SCOPE

The ancient diploid Triticum monococcum is of special interest as a candidate low-toxic wheat species for celiac disease patients. Here, we investigated how an in vitro gastro-intestinal digestion, affected the immune toxic properties of gliadin from diploid compared to hexaploid wheat.

METHODS AND RESULTS

Gliadins from Triticum monococcum, and Triticum aestivum cultivars were digested using either a partial proteolysis with pepsin-chymotrypsin, or an extensive degradation that used gastrointestinal enzymes including the brush border membrane enzymes. The immune stimulatory properties of the digested samples were investigated on T-cell lines and jejunal biopsies from celiac disease patients. The T-cell response profile to the Triticum monococcum gliadin was comparable to that obtained with Triticum aestivum gliadin after the partial pepsin-chymotrypsin digestion. In contrast, the extensive gastrointestinal hydrolysis drastically reduced the immune stimulatory properties of Triticum monococcum gliadin. MS-based analysis showed that several Triticum monococcum peptides, including known T-cell epitopes, were degraded during the gastrointestinal treatment, whereas many of Triticum aestivum gliadin survived the gastrointestinal digestion.

CONCLUSION

The pattern of Triticum monococcum gliadin proteins is sufficiently different from those of common hexaploid wheat to determine a lower toxicity in celiac disease patients following in vitro simulation of human digestion.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Avellino, Italy. Institute of Biochemistry Protein, CNR, Napoli, Italy.Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Avellino, Italy.Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Avellino, Italy.Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Avellino, Italy.Gastroenterology Department, S. G. Moscati Hospital, Avellino, Italy.Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Avellino, Italy. Department of Agricultural, University "Federico II" Napoli, Italy.Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Avellino, Italy.Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Avellino, Italy.Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Avellino, Italy.Department of Translational Medical Science and E.L.F.I.D, University "Federico II" Napoli, Italy.Consiglio per la Ricerca e la Sperimentazione in Agricoltura, Roma, Italy.Department of Translational Medical Science and E.L.F.I.D, University "Federico II" Napoli, Italy.Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Avellino, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26016626

Citation

Gianfrani, Carmen, et al. "Extensive in Vitro Gastrointestinal Digestion Markedly Reduces the Immune-toxicity of Triticum Monococcum Wheat: Implication for Celiac Disease." Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, vol. 59, no. 9, 2015, pp. 1844-54.
Gianfrani C, Camarca A, Mazzarella G, et al. Extensive in vitro gastrointestinal digestion markedly reduces the immune-toxicity of Triticum monococcum wheat: implication for celiac disease. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2015;59(9):1844-54.
Gianfrani, C., Camarca, A., Mazzarella, G., Di Stasio, L., Giardullo, N., Ferranti, P., Picariello, G., Rotondi Aufiero, V., Picascia, S., Troncone, R., Pogna, N., Auricchio, S., & Mamone, G. (2015). Extensive in vitro gastrointestinal digestion markedly reduces the immune-toxicity of Triticum monococcum wheat: implication for celiac disease. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 59(9), 1844-54. https://doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.201500126
Gianfrani C, et al. Extensive in Vitro Gastrointestinal Digestion Markedly Reduces the Immune-toxicity of Triticum Monococcum Wheat: Implication for Celiac Disease. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2015;59(9):1844-54. PubMed PMID: 26016626.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Extensive in vitro gastrointestinal digestion markedly reduces the immune-toxicity of Triticum monococcum wheat: implication for celiac disease. AU - Gianfrani,Carmen, AU - Camarca,Alessandra, AU - Mazzarella,Giuseppe, AU - Di Stasio,Luigia, AU - Giardullo,Nicola, AU - Ferranti,Pasquale, AU - Picariello,Gianluca, AU - Rotondi Aufiero,Vera, AU - Picascia,Stefania, AU - Troncone,Riccardo, AU - Pogna,Norberto, AU - Auricchio,Salvatore, AU - Mamone,Gianfranco, Y1 - 2015/06/26/ PY - 2015/02/15/received PY - 2015/04/22/revised PY - 2015/04/29/accepted PY - 2015/5/29/entrez PY - 2015/5/29/pubmed PY - 2016/7/29/medline KW - Brush border membrane KW - Celiac disease KW - Gastrointestinal digestion KW - Gliadin KW - Triticum monococcum SP - 1844 EP - 54 JF - Molecular nutrition & food research JO - Mol Nutr Food Res VL - 59 IS - 9 N2 - SCOPE: The ancient diploid Triticum monococcum is of special interest as a candidate low-toxic wheat species for celiac disease patients. Here, we investigated how an in vitro gastro-intestinal digestion, affected the immune toxic properties of gliadin from diploid compared to hexaploid wheat. METHODS AND RESULTS: Gliadins from Triticum monococcum, and Triticum aestivum cultivars were digested using either a partial proteolysis with pepsin-chymotrypsin, or an extensive degradation that used gastrointestinal enzymes including the brush border membrane enzymes. The immune stimulatory properties of the digested samples were investigated on T-cell lines and jejunal biopsies from celiac disease patients. The T-cell response profile to the Triticum monococcum gliadin was comparable to that obtained with Triticum aestivum gliadin after the partial pepsin-chymotrypsin digestion. In contrast, the extensive gastrointestinal hydrolysis drastically reduced the immune stimulatory properties of Triticum monococcum gliadin. MS-based analysis showed that several Triticum monococcum peptides, including known T-cell epitopes, were degraded during the gastrointestinal treatment, whereas many of Triticum aestivum gliadin survived the gastrointestinal digestion. CONCLUSION: The pattern of Triticum monococcum gliadin proteins is sufficiently different from those of common hexaploid wheat to determine a lower toxicity in celiac disease patients following in vitro simulation of human digestion. SN - 1613-4133 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26016626/Extensive_in_vitro_gastrointestinal_digestion_markedly_reduces_the_immune_toxicity_of_Triticum_monococcum_wheat:_implication_for_celiac_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.201500126 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -