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Risk of lung cancer and consumption of vegetables and fruit in Japanese: A pooled analysis of cohort studies in Japan.
Cancer Sci 2015; 106(8):1057-65CS

Abstract

International reviews have concluded that consumption of fruit and vegetables might decrease the risk of lung cancer. However, the relevant epidemiological evidence still remains insufficient in Japan. Therefore, we performed a pooled analysis of data from four population-based cohort studies in Japan with >200 000 participants and >1700 lung cancer cases. We computed study-specific hazard ratios by quintiles of vegetable and fruit consumption as assessed by food frequency questionnaires. Summary hazard ratios were estimated by pooling the study-specific hazard ratios with a fixed-effect model. In men, we found inverse associations between fruit consumption and the age-adjusted and area-adjusted risk of mortality or incidence of lung cancer. However, the associations were largely attenuated after adjustment for smoking and energy intake. The significant decrease in risk among men remained only for a moderate level of fruit consumption; the lowest summary hazard ratios were found in the third quintile of intake (mortality: 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.60-0.84; incidence: 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.70-0.98). This decrease in risk was mainly detected in ever smokers. Conversely, vegetable intake was positively correlated with the risk of incidence of lung cancer after adjustment for smoking and energy intake in men (trend P, 0.024); the summary hazard ratio for the highest quintile was 1.26 (95% confidence interval 1.05-1.50). However, a similar association was not detected for mortality from lung cancer. In conclusion, a moderate level of fruit consumption is associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer in men among the Japanese population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Forensic Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Forensic Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan.Department of Public Health, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Preventive Medicine, Kyushu University Faculty of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka, Japan.Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu, Japan.Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Clinical Research Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan.Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan. Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan.Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26033436

Citation

Wakai, Kenji, et al. "Risk of Lung Cancer and Consumption of Vegetables and Fruit in Japanese: a Pooled Analysis of Cohort Studies in Japan." Cancer Science, vol. 106, no. 8, 2015, pp. 1057-65.
Wakai K, Sugawara Y, Tsuji I, et al. Risk of lung cancer and consumption of vegetables and fruit in Japanese: A pooled analysis of cohort studies in Japan. Cancer Sci. 2015;106(8):1057-65.
Wakai, K., Sugawara, Y., Tsuji, I., Tamakoshi, A., Shimazu, T., Matsuo, K., ... Sasazuki, S. (2015). Risk of lung cancer and consumption of vegetables and fruit in Japanese: A pooled analysis of cohort studies in Japan. Cancer Science, 106(8), pp. 1057-65. doi:10.1111/cas.12707.
Wakai K, et al. Risk of Lung Cancer and Consumption of Vegetables and Fruit in Japanese: a Pooled Analysis of Cohort Studies in Japan. Cancer Sci. 2015;106(8):1057-65. PubMed PMID: 26033436.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk of lung cancer and consumption of vegetables and fruit in Japanese: A pooled analysis of cohort studies in Japan. AU - Wakai,Kenji, AU - Sugawara,Yumi, AU - Tsuji,Ichiro, AU - Tamakoshi,Akiko, AU - Shimazu,Taichi, AU - Matsuo,Keitaro, AU - Nagata,Chisato, AU - Mizoue,Tetsuya, AU - Tanaka,Keitaro, AU - Inoue,Manami, AU - Tsugane,Shoichiro, AU - Sasazuki,Shizuka, AU - ,, Y1 - 2015/07/24/ PY - 2015/01/14/received PY - 2015/05/04/revised PY - 2015/05/25/accepted PY - 2015/6/3/entrez PY - 2015/6/3/pubmed PY - 2015/10/28/medline KW - Cohort studies KW - fruit KW - lung neoplasms KW - meta-analysis KW - vegetables SP - 1057 EP - 65 JF - Cancer science JO - Cancer Sci. VL - 106 IS - 8 N2 - International reviews have concluded that consumption of fruit and vegetables might decrease the risk of lung cancer. However, the relevant epidemiological evidence still remains insufficient in Japan. Therefore, we performed a pooled analysis of data from four population-based cohort studies in Japan with >200 000 participants and >1700 lung cancer cases. We computed study-specific hazard ratios by quintiles of vegetable and fruit consumption as assessed by food frequency questionnaires. Summary hazard ratios were estimated by pooling the study-specific hazard ratios with a fixed-effect model. In men, we found inverse associations between fruit consumption and the age-adjusted and area-adjusted risk of mortality or incidence of lung cancer. However, the associations were largely attenuated after adjustment for smoking and energy intake. The significant decrease in risk among men remained only for a moderate level of fruit consumption; the lowest summary hazard ratios were found in the third quintile of intake (mortality: 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.60-0.84; incidence: 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.70-0.98). This decrease in risk was mainly detected in ever smokers. Conversely, vegetable intake was positively correlated with the risk of incidence of lung cancer after adjustment for smoking and energy intake in men (trend P, 0.024); the summary hazard ratio for the highest quintile was 1.26 (95% confidence interval 1.05-1.50). However, a similar association was not detected for mortality from lung cancer. In conclusion, a moderate level of fruit consumption is associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer in men among the Japanese population. SN - 1349-7006 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26033436/Risk_of_lung_cancer_and_consumption_of_vegetables_and_fruit_in_Japanese:_A_pooled_analysis_of_cohort_studies_in_Japan_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/cas.12707 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -