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Persistence of antibodies six years after booster vaccination with inactivated vaccine against Japanese encephalitis.
Vaccine 2015; 33(30):3600-4V

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Japanese Encephalitis (JE) virus occurs in wide regions of Asia with over 3 billion people living in areas at risk for JE. An estimated 68,000 clinical cases of JE occur every year, and vaccination is the most effective prophylactic measure. One internationally licensed vaccine containing the inactivated JE virus strain SA14-14-2 is Ixiaro (Valneva, Austria). According to recommendations, basic immunization consists of vaccinations on day 0, day 28, and a booster dose 12-24 months later. Protection in terms of neutralizing antibody titers has been assessed up to 12 months after the third dose of the vaccine. The current investigation was designed to evaluate antibody decline over time and to predict long-term duration of seroprotection after a booster dose.

METHOD

In a preceding trial, volunteers received basic immunization (day 0, day 28) and one booster dose against JE 15 months later. A follow up blood draw 6 years following their booster dose was carried out in 67 subjects. For antibody testing, a 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT50-test) was used. PRNT50 values of 10 and above are surrogate levels of protection according to WHO standards.

RESULT

Seventy-six months following the booster dose, 96% of the tested subjects had PRNT50 titers of 10 or higher. Geometric mean titer (GMT) was 148 (95% CI confidence interval: 107-207). Antibody titers were lower in volunteers 50 years of age and older. Vaccination history against other flaviviruses (yellow fever or tick borne encephalitis) did not significantly influence PRNT50 titers. A two-step log-linear decline model predicted protection against JE of approximately 14 years after the booster dose.

CONCLUSION

Six years after a booster dose against JE, long-term protection could be demonstrated. According to our results, further booster doses should be scheduled 10 years following the first booster dose.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Specific Prophylaxis and Tropical Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Kinderspitalgasse 15, A-1090, Vienna, Austria; Federal Ministry of Health, Austria.Institute of Specific Prophylaxis and Tropical Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Kinderspitalgasse 15, A-1090, Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: herwig.kollaritsch@meduniwien.ac.at.Institute of Environmental Health, Center for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, Kinderspitalgasse 15, A-1090, Vienna, Austria.Institute of Specific Prophylaxis and Tropical Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Kinderspitalgasse 15, A-1090, Vienna, Austria.Institute of Specific Prophylaxis and Tropical Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Kinderspitalgasse 15, A-1090, Vienna, Austria.Berlin Center for Travel and Tropical Medicine, Berlin, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26036947

Citation

Paulke-Korinek, Maria, et al. "Persistence of Antibodies Six Years After Booster Vaccination With Inactivated Vaccine Against Japanese Encephalitis." Vaccine, vol. 33, no. 30, 2015, pp. 3600-4.
Paulke-Korinek M, Kollaritsch H, Kundi M, et al. Persistence of antibodies six years after booster vaccination with inactivated vaccine against Japanese encephalitis. Vaccine. 2015;33(30):3600-4.
Paulke-Korinek, M., Kollaritsch, H., Kundi, M., Zwazl, I., Seidl-Friedrich, C., & Jelinek, T. (2015). Persistence of antibodies six years after booster vaccination with inactivated vaccine against Japanese encephalitis. Vaccine, 33(30), pp. 3600-4. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.05.037.
Paulke-Korinek M, et al. Persistence of Antibodies Six Years After Booster Vaccination With Inactivated Vaccine Against Japanese Encephalitis. Vaccine. 2015 Jul 9;33(30):3600-4. PubMed PMID: 26036947.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Persistence of antibodies six years after booster vaccination with inactivated vaccine against Japanese encephalitis. AU - Paulke-Korinek,Maria, AU - Kollaritsch,Herwig, AU - Kundi,Michael, AU - Zwazl,Ines, AU - Seidl-Friedrich,Claudia, AU - Jelinek,Tomas, Y1 - 2015/05/30/ PY - 2015/02/19/received PY - 2015/05/10/revised PY - 2015/05/17/accepted PY - 2015/6/4/entrez PY - 2015/6/4/pubmed PY - 2016/3/16/medline KW - Japanese encephalitis vaccine KW - Long-term protection KW - Low responder SP - 3600 EP - 4 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 33 IS - 30 N2 - BACKGROUND: Japanese Encephalitis (JE) virus occurs in wide regions of Asia with over 3 billion people living in areas at risk for JE. An estimated 68,000 clinical cases of JE occur every year, and vaccination is the most effective prophylactic measure. One internationally licensed vaccine containing the inactivated JE virus strain SA14-14-2 is Ixiaro (Valneva, Austria). According to recommendations, basic immunization consists of vaccinations on day 0, day 28, and a booster dose 12-24 months later. Protection in terms of neutralizing antibody titers has been assessed up to 12 months after the third dose of the vaccine. The current investigation was designed to evaluate antibody decline over time and to predict long-term duration of seroprotection after a booster dose. METHOD: In a preceding trial, volunteers received basic immunization (day 0, day 28) and one booster dose against JE 15 months later. A follow up blood draw 6 years following their booster dose was carried out in 67 subjects. For antibody testing, a 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT50-test) was used. PRNT50 values of 10 and above are surrogate levels of protection according to WHO standards. RESULT: Seventy-six months following the booster dose, 96% of the tested subjects had PRNT50 titers of 10 or higher. Geometric mean titer (GMT) was 148 (95% CI confidence interval: 107-207). Antibody titers were lower in volunteers 50 years of age and older. Vaccination history against other flaviviruses (yellow fever or tick borne encephalitis) did not significantly influence PRNT50 titers. A two-step log-linear decline model predicted protection against JE of approximately 14 years after the booster dose. CONCLUSION: Six years after a booster dose against JE, long-term protection could be demonstrated. According to our results, further booster doses should be scheduled 10 years following the first booster dose. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26036947/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(15)00689-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -