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Socio-economic status and ethnicity are independently associated with dietary patterns: the HELIUS-Dietary Patterns study.
Food Nutr Res. 2015; 59:26317.FN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Differences in dietary patterns between ethnic groups have often been observed. These differences may partially be a reflection of differences in socio-economic status (SES) or may be the result of differences in the direction and strength of the association between SES and diet.

OBJECTIVE

We aimed to examine ethnic differences in dietary patterns and the role of socio-economic indicators on dietary patterns within a multi-ethnic population.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional multi-ethnic population-based study.

SETTING

Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

SUBJECTS

Principal component analysis was used to identify dietary patterns among Dutch (n=1,254), South Asian Surinamese (n=425), and African Surinamese (n=784) participants. Levels of education and occupation were used to indicate SES. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the association between ethnicity and dietary pattern scores first and then between socio-economic indicators and dietary patterns within and between ethnic groups.

RESULTS

'Noodle/rice dishes and white meat', 'red meat, snacks, and sweets' and 'vegetables, fruit and nuts' patterns were identified. Compared to the Dutch origin participants, Surinamese more closely adhered to the 'noodle/rice dishes and white meat' pattern which was characterized by foods consumed in a 'traditional Surinamese diet'. Closer adherence to the other two patterns was observed among Dutch compared to Surinamese origin participants. Ethnic differences in dietary patterns persisted within strata of education and occupation. Surinamese showed greater adherence to a 'traditional' pattern independent of SES. Among Dutch participants, a clear socio-economic gradient in all dietary patterns was observed. Such a gradient was only present among Surinamese dietary oatterns to the 'vegetables, fruit and nuts' pattern.

CONCLUSIONS

We found a selective change in the adherence to dietary patterns among Surinamese origin participants, presumably a move towards more vegetables and fruits with higher SES but continued fidelity to the traditional diet.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; l.h.dekker@amc.uva.nl.Department of Public Health, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health and Department of Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore.Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands.Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands.Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands.Department of Public Health, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Department of Public Health, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26041009

Citation

Dekker, Louise H., et al. "Socio-economic Status and Ethnicity Are Independently Associated With Dietary Patterns: the HELIUS-Dietary Patterns Study." Food & Nutrition Research, vol. 59, 2015, p. 26317.
Dekker LH, Nicolaou M, van Dam RM, et al. Socio-economic status and ethnicity are independently associated with dietary patterns: the HELIUS-Dietary Patterns study. Food Nutr Res. 2015;59:26317.
Dekker, L. H., Nicolaou, M., van Dam, R. M., de Vries, J. H., de Boer, E. J., Brants, H. A., Beukers, M. H., Snijder, M. B., & Stronks, K. (2015). Socio-economic status and ethnicity are independently associated with dietary patterns: the HELIUS-Dietary Patterns study. Food & Nutrition Research, 59, 26317. https://doi.org/10.3402/fnr.v59.26317
Dekker LH, et al. Socio-economic Status and Ethnicity Are Independently Associated With Dietary Patterns: the HELIUS-Dietary Patterns Study. Food Nutr Res. 2015;59:26317. PubMed PMID: 26041009.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Socio-economic status and ethnicity are independently associated with dietary patterns: the HELIUS-Dietary Patterns study. AU - Dekker,Louise H, AU - Nicolaou,Mary, AU - van Dam,Rob M, AU - de Vries,Jeanne H M, AU - de Boer,Evelien J, AU - Brants,Henny A M, AU - Beukers,Marja H, AU - Snijder,Marieke B, AU - Stronks,Karien, Y1 - 2015/06/02/ PY - 2014/10/14/received PY - 2015/04/16/revised PY - 2015/04/22/accepted PY - 2015/6/5/entrez PY - 2015/6/5/pubmed PY - 2015/6/5/medline KW - HELIUS study KW - dietary patterns KW - education KW - non-Western ethnic minority groups KW - occupation KW - socio-economic status SP - 26317 EP - 26317 JF - Food & nutrition research JO - Food Nutr Res VL - 59 N2 - BACKGROUND: Differences in dietary patterns between ethnic groups have often been observed. These differences may partially be a reflection of differences in socio-economic status (SES) or may be the result of differences in the direction and strength of the association between SES and diet. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine ethnic differences in dietary patterns and the role of socio-economic indicators on dietary patterns within a multi-ethnic population. DESIGN: Cross-sectional multi-ethnic population-based study. SETTING: Amsterdam, the Netherlands. SUBJECTS: Principal component analysis was used to identify dietary patterns among Dutch (n=1,254), South Asian Surinamese (n=425), and African Surinamese (n=784) participants. Levels of education and occupation were used to indicate SES. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the association between ethnicity and dietary pattern scores first and then between socio-economic indicators and dietary patterns within and between ethnic groups. RESULTS: 'Noodle/rice dishes and white meat', 'red meat, snacks, and sweets' and 'vegetables, fruit and nuts' patterns were identified. Compared to the Dutch origin participants, Surinamese more closely adhered to the 'noodle/rice dishes and white meat' pattern which was characterized by foods consumed in a 'traditional Surinamese diet'. Closer adherence to the other two patterns was observed among Dutch compared to Surinamese origin participants. Ethnic differences in dietary patterns persisted within strata of education and occupation. Surinamese showed greater adherence to a 'traditional' pattern independent of SES. Among Dutch participants, a clear socio-economic gradient in all dietary patterns was observed. Such a gradient was only present among Surinamese dietary oatterns to the 'vegetables, fruit and nuts' pattern. CONCLUSIONS: We found a selective change in the adherence to dietary patterns among Surinamese origin participants, presumably a move towards more vegetables and fruits with higher SES but continued fidelity to the traditional diet. SN - 1654-661X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26041009/Socio_economic_status_and_ethnicity_are_independently_associated_with_dietary_patterns:_the_HELIUS_Dietary_Patterns_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.3402/fnr.v59.26317 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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