Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

ETHNICITY AND INCOME IMPACT ON BMI AND STATURE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN LIVING IN URBAN SOUTHERN MEXICO.
J Biosoc Sci. 2016 Mar; 48(2):143-57.JB

Abstract

Obesity affects quality of life and increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. Mexico, a middle-income country, has a high prevalence of overweight and obesity among urban children. Merida is the most populated and growing city in southern Mexico with a mixed Mayan and non-Maya population. Local urbanization and access to industrialized foods have impacted the eating habits and physical activity of children, increasing the risk of overweight and obesity. This study aimed to contribute to the existing literature on the global prevalence of overweight and obesity and examined the association of parental income, ethnicity and nutritional status with body mass index (BMI) and height in primary school children in Merida. The heights and weights of 3243 children aged 6-12 from sixteen randomly selected schools in the city were collected between April and December 2012. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to examine differences in the prevalence of BMI and height categories (based on WHO reference values) by ethnicity and income levels. Of the total students, 1648 (50.9%) were overweight or obese. Stunting was found in 227 children (7%), while 755 (23.3%) were defined as having short stature. Combined stunting and overweight/obesity was found in 301 students (9.3%) and twelve (0.4%) were classified as stunted and of low weight. Having two Mayan surnames was inversely associated with having adequate height (OR=0.69, p<0.05) and the presence of two Maya surnames in children increased the odds of short stature and stunting. Children from lower income families had twice the odds of being stunted and obese. Overweight, obesity and short stature were frequent among the studied children. A significant proportion of Meridan children could face an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and its associated negative economic and social outcomes unless healthier habits are adopted. Action is needed to reduce the prevalence of obesity among southern Mexican families of all ethnic groups, particularly those of lower income.

Authors+Show Affiliations

*Regional Research Centre 'Dr Hideyo Noguchi',Biomedical Unit,Merida,Yucatan,Mexico.*Regional Research Centre 'Dr Hideyo Noguchi',Biomedical Unit,Merida,Yucatan,Mexico.†Faculty of Medicine,Autonomous University of Yucatan,Merida,Yucatan,Mexico.*Regional Research Centre 'Dr Hideyo Noguchi',Biomedical Unit,Merida,Yucatan,Mexico.‡Centres for Research and Advanced Studies,Department of Human Ecology,Merida,Yucatan,Mexico.‡Centres for Research and Advanced Studies,Department of Human Ecology,Merida,Yucatan,Mexico.§Fielding School of Public Health,University of California Los Angeles,Los Angeles,CA,USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26041567

Citation

Mendez, Nina, et al. "ETHNICITY and INCOME IMPACT ON BMI and STATURE of SCHOOL CHILDREN LIVING in URBAN SOUTHERN MEXICO." Journal of Biosocial Science, vol. 48, no. 2, 2016, pp. 143-57.
Mendez N, Barrera-Pérez TL, Palma-Solis M, et al. ETHNICITY AND INCOME IMPACT ON BMI AND STATURE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN LIVING IN URBAN SOUTHERN MEXICO. J Biosoc Sci. 2016;48(2):143-57.
Mendez, N., Barrera-Pérez, T. L., Palma-Solis, M., Zavala-Castro, J., Dickinson, F., Azcorra, H., & Prelip, M. (2016). ETHNICITY AND INCOME IMPACT ON BMI AND STATURE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN LIVING IN URBAN SOUTHERN MEXICO. Journal of Biosocial Science, 48(2), 143-57. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0021932015000127
Mendez N, et al. ETHNICITY and INCOME IMPACT ON BMI and STATURE of SCHOOL CHILDREN LIVING in URBAN SOUTHERN MEXICO. J Biosoc Sci. 2016;48(2):143-57. PubMed PMID: 26041567.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - ETHNICITY AND INCOME IMPACT ON BMI AND STATURE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN LIVING IN URBAN SOUTHERN MEXICO. AU - Mendez,Nina, AU - Barrera-Pérez,The Late Mario, AU - Palma-Solis,Marco, AU - Zavala-Castro,Jorge, AU - Dickinson,Federico, AU - Azcorra,Hugo, AU - Prelip,Michael, Y1 - 2015/06/04/ PY - 2015/6/5/entrez PY - 2015/6/5/pubmed PY - 2017/1/14/medline SP - 143 EP - 57 JF - Journal of biosocial science JO - J Biosoc Sci VL - 48 IS - 2 N2 - Obesity affects quality of life and increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. Mexico, a middle-income country, has a high prevalence of overweight and obesity among urban children. Merida is the most populated and growing city in southern Mexico with a mixed Mayan and non-Maya population. Local urbanization and access to industrialized foods have impacted the eating habits and physical activity of children, increasing the risk of overweight and obesity. This study aimed to contribute to the existing literature on the global prevalence of overweight and obesity and examined the association of parental income, ethnicity and nutritional status with body mass index (BMI) and height in primary school children in Merida. The heights and weights of 3243 children aged 6-12 from sixteen randomly selected schools in the city were collected between April and December 2012. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to examine differences in the prevalence of BMI and height categories (based on WHO reference values) by ethnicity and income levels. Of the total students, 1648 (50.9%) were overweight or obese. Stunting was found in 227 children (7%), while 755 (23.3%) were defined as having short stature. Combined stunting and overweight/obesity was found in 301 students (9.3%) and twelve (0.4%) were classified as stunted and of low weight. Having two Mayan surnames was inversely associated with having adequate height (OR=0.69, p<0.05) and the presence of two Maya surnames in children increased the odds of short stature and stunting. Children from lower income families had twice the odds of being stunted and obese. Overweight, obesity and short stature were frequent among the studied children. A significant proportion of Meridan children could face an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and its associated negative economic and social outcomes unless healthier habits are adopted. Action is needed to reduce the prevalence of obesity among southern Mexican families of all ethnic groups, particularly those of lower income. SN - 1469-7599 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26041567/ETHNICITY_AND_INCOME_IMPACT_ON_BMI_AND_STATURE_OF_SCHOOL_CHILDREN_LIVING_IN_URBAN_SOUTHERN_MEXICO_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0021932015000127/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -