Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Brief report: Associations between in-person and electronic bullying victimization and missing school because of safety concerns among U.S. high school students.
J Adolesc. 2015 Aug; 43:1-4.JA

Abstract

Although associations between bullying and health risk behaviors are well-documented, research on bullying and education-related outcomes, including school attendance, is limited. This study examines associations between bullying victimization (in-person and electronic) and missing school because of safety concerns among a nationally representative sample of U.S. high school students. We used logistic regression analyses to analyze data from the 2013 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey of students in grades 9-12. In-person and electronic victimization were each associated with increased odds of missing school due to safety concerns compared to no bullying victimization. Having been bullied both in-person and electronically was associated with greater odds of missing school compared to electronic bullying only for female students and in-person bullying only for male students. Collaborations between health professionals and educators to prevent bullying may improve school attendance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: rsteiner@cdc.gov.Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26043166

Citation

Steiner, Riley J., and Catherine N. Rasberry. "Brief Report: Associations Between In-person and Electronic Bullying Victimization and Missing School Because of Safety Concerns Among U.S. High School Students." Journal of Adolescence, vol. 43, 2015, pp. 1-4.
Steiner RJ, Rasberry CN. Brief report: Associations between in-person and electronic bullying victimization and missing school because of safety concerns among U.S. high school students. J Adolesc. 2015;43:1-4.
Steiner, R. J., & Rasberry, C. N. (2015). Brief report: Associations between in-person and electronic bullying victimization and missing school because of safety concerns among U.S. high school students. Journal of Adolescence, 43, 1-4. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2015.05.005
Steiner RJ, Rasberry CN. Brief Report: Associations Between In-person and Electronic Bullying Victimization and Missing School Because of Safety Concerns Among U.S. High School Students. J Adolesc. 2015;43:1-4. PubMed PMID: 26043166.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Brief report: Associations between in-person and electronic bullying victimization and missing school because of safety concerns among U.S. high school students. AU - Steiner,Riley J, AU - Rasberry,Catherine N, Y1 - 2015/06/01/ PY - 2014/09/10/received PY - 2015/03/16/revised PY - 2015/05/10/accepted PY - 2015/6/5/entrez PY - 2015/6/5/pubmed PY - 2016/6/25/medline KW - Adolescence KW - Bullying KW - Cyberbullying KW - School absenteeism SP - 1 EP - 4 JF - Journal of adolescence JO - J Adolesc VL - 43 N2 - Although associations between bullying and health risk behaviors are well-documented, research on bullying and education-related outcomes, including school attendance, is limited. This study examines associations between bullying victimization (in-person and electronic) and missing school because of safety concerns among a nationally representative sample of U.S. high school students. We used logistic regression analyses to analyze data from the 2013 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey of students in grades 9-12. In-person and electronic victimization were each associated with increased odds of missing school due to safety concerns compared to no bullying victimization. Having been bullied both in-person and electronically was associated with greater odds of missing school compared to electronic bullying only for female students and in-person bullying only for male students. Collaborations between health professionals and educators to prevent bullying may improve school attendance. SN - 1095-9254 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26043166/Brief_report:_Associations_between_in_person_and_electronic_bullying_victimization_and_missing_school_because_of_safety_concerns_among_U_S__high_school_students_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0140-1971(15)00099-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -