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Retinal pigment epithelium transplantation: concepts, challenges, and future prospects.
Eye (Lond). 2015 Aug; 29(8):992-1002.E

Abstract

The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a single layer of cells that supports the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that are essential for retinal function. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment, and the primary pathogenic mechanism is thought to arise in the RPE layer. RPE cell structure and function are well understood, the cells are readily sustainable in laboratory culture and, unlike other cell types within the retina, RPE cells do not require synaptic connections to perform their role. These factors, together with the relative ease of outer retinal imaging, make RPE cells an attractive target for cell transplantation compared with other cell types in the retina or central nervous system. Seminal experiments in rats with an inherited RPE dystrophy have demonstrated that RPE transplantation can prevent photoreceptor loss and maintain visual function. This review provides an update on the progress made so far on RPE transplantation in human eyes, outlines potential sources of donor cells, and describes the technical and surgical challenges faced by the transplanting surgeon. Recent advances in the understanding of pluripotent stem cells, combined with novel surgical instrumentation, hold considerable promise, and support the concept of RPE transplantation as a regenerative strategy in AMD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clinical Neurosciences Research Group, Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, University Hospital Southampton, Southampton, UK.Clinical Neurosciences Research Group, Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, University Hospital Southampton, Southampton, UK.Clinical Neurosciences Research Group, Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, University Hospital Southampton, Southampton, UK.Clinical Neurosciences Research Group, Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, University Hospital Southampton, Southampton, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26043704

Citation

Alexander, P, et al. "Retinal Pigment Epithelium Transplantation: Concepts, Challenges, and Future Prospects." Eye (London, England), vol. 29, no. 8, 2015, pp. 992-1002.
Alexander P, Thomson HA, Luff AJ, et al. Retinal pigment epithelium transplantation: concepts, challenges, and future prospects. Eye (Lond). 2015;29(8):992-1002.
Alexander, P., Thomson, H. A., Luff, A. J., & Lotery, A. J. (2015). Retinal pigment epithelium transplantation: concepts, challenges, and future prospects. Eye (London, England), 29(8), 992-1002. https://doi.org/10.1038/eye.2015.89
Alexander P, et al. Retinal Pigment Epithelium Transplantation: Concepts, Challenges, and Future Prospects. Eye (Lond). 2015;29(8):992-1002. PubMed PMID: 26043704.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Retinal pigment epithelium transplantation: concepts, challenges, and future prospects. AU - Alexander,P, AU - Thomson,H A J, AU - Luff,A J, AU - Lotery,A J, Y1 - 2015/06/05/ PY - 2014/11/10/received PY - 2015/04/14/accepted PY - 2015/6/6/entrez PY - 2015/6/6/pubmed PY - 2016/4/9/medline SP - 992 EP - 1002 JF - Eye (London, England) JO - Eye (Lond) VL - 29 IS - 8 N2 - The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a single layer of cells that supports the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that are essential for retinal function. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment, and the primary pathogenic mechanism is thought to arise in the RPE layer. RPE cell structure and function are well understood, the cells are readily sustainable in laboratory culture and, unlike other cell types within the retina, RPE cells do not require synaptic connections to perform their role. These factors, together with the relative ease of outer retinal imaging, make RPE cells an attractive target for cell transplantation compared with other cell types in the retina or central nervous system. Seminal experiments in rats with an inherited RPE dystrophy have demonstrated that RPE transplantation can prevent photoreceptor loss and maintain visual function. This review provides an update on the progress made so far on RPE transplantation in human eyes, outlines potential sources of donor cells, and describes the technical and surgical challenges faced by the transplanting surgeon. Recent advances in the understanding of pluripotent stem cells, combined with novel surgical instrumentation, hold considerable promise, and support the concept of RPE transplantation as a regenerative strategy in AMD. SN - 1476-5454 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26043704/Retinal_pigment_epithelium_transplantation:_concepts_challenges_and_future_prospects_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/eye.2015.89 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -