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Rapana venosa consumption improves the lipid profiles and antioxidant capacities in serum of rats fed an atherogenic diet.
Nutr Res. 2015 Jul; 35(7):592-602.NR

Abstract

In the recent years, the consumption of seafood has increased. There are no results on the studies of Rapana venosa (Rv) as a supplementation to the diets. We hypothesized that Rv would increase antioxidant capacity and reduce blood lipids, based on the composition of bioactive compounds and fatty acids. Therefore, the aim of this investigation was to evaluate in vitro and in vivo actions of Rv from contaminated (C) and non-C (NC) regions of collection on lipid profiles, antioxidant capacity, and enzyme activities in serum of rats fed an atherogenic diet. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups of 6 each and named control, cholesterol (Chol), Chol/RvC and Chol/RvNC. Rats of all 4 groups were fed the basal diet, which included wheat starch, casein, soybean oil, cellulose, vitamin (American Institute of Nutrition for laboratory animals vitamin mixtures), and mineral mixtures (American Institute of Nutrition for laboratory animals mineral mixtures). During 28 days of the experiment, the rats of the control group received the basal diet only, and the diets of the other 3 groups were supplemented with 1% of Chol, 1% of Chol, and 5% of Rv dry matter from C and NC areas. Dry matter from C and NC areas supplemented diets slightly hindered the rise in serum lipids vs. Chol group: total Chol, 13.18% and 11.63% and low-density lipoprotein Chol, 13.57% and 15.08%, respectively. Cholesterol significantly decreased the value of total antioxidant capacity. The supplementation of Rv to the Chol diet significantly affected the increase of antioxidant capacity in serum of rats, expressed by the 2,2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) method. The water extracts of Rv exhibited high binding properties with bovine serum albumin in comparison with quercetin. In conclusion, atherogenic diets supplemented with Rv from C and NC areas hindered both the rise in serum lipids levels and the decrease in the antioxidant capacity. Based on fluorescence and electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry profiles and in vivo studies, changes in the intensity of the found peaks were estimated in the serum samples after supplemented diets. These findings indicate that the supplementation of Rv to the atherogenic diets improve the lipid profiles and the antioxidant status in serum of rats.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physiological Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland. Electronic address: maria_leontowicz@sggw.pl.Department of Physiological Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.Department of Analytical Chemistry, Chemical Faculty, Gdańsk University of Technology, Gdańsk, Poland 80 952.Department of Chemical Oceanography, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.The Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, The Hebrew University, Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem 91120, Israel.The Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, The Hebrew University, Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem 91120, Israel.Institute of Oceanology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 9000 Varna, Bulgaria.Institute of Organic Chemistry with Centre of Phytochemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria.Kaplan Medical Center, 76100 Rehovot, Israel.The Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, The Hebrew University, Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem 91120, Israel. Electronic address: shela.gorin@mail.huji.ac.il.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26048343

Citation

Leontowicz, Maria, et al. "Rapana Venosa Consumption Improves the Lipid Profiles and Antioxidant Capacities in Serum of Rats Fed an Atherogenic Diet." Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), vol. 35, no. 7, 2015, pp. 592-602.
Leontowicz M, Leontowicz H, Namiesnik J, et al. Rapana venosa consumption improves the lipid profiles and antioxidant capacities in serum of rats fed an atherogenic diet. Nutr Res. 2015;35(7):592-602.
Leontowicz, M., Leontowicz, H., Namiesnik, J., Apak, R., Barasch, D., Nemirovski, A., Moncheva, S., Goshev, I., Trakhtenberg, S., & Gorinstein, S. (2015). Rapana venosa consumption improves the lipid profiles and antioxidant capacities in serum of rats fed an atherogenic diet. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), 35(7), 592-602. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2015.05.003
Leontowicz M, et al. Rapana Venosa Consumption Improves the Lipid Profiles and Antioxidant Capacities in Serum of Rats Fed an Atherogenic Diet. Nutr Res. 2015;35(7):592-602. PubMed PMID: 26048343.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rapana venosa consumption improves the lipid profiles and antioxidant capacities in serum of rats fed an atherogenic diet. AU - Leontowicz,Maria, AU - Leontowicz,Hanna, AU - Namiesnik,Jacek, AU - Apak,Resat, AU - Barasch,Dinorah, AU - Nemirovski,Alina, AU - Moncheva,Snejana, AU - Goshev,Ivan, AU - Trakhtenberg,Simon, AU - Gorinstein,Shela, Y1 - 2015/05/15/ PY - 2015/03/06/received PY - 2015/05/08/revised PY - 2015/05/11/accepted PY - 2015/6/7/entrez PY - 2015/6/7/pubmed PY - 2016/5/3/medline KW - Cholesterol spectrum KW - Contaminated and noncontaminated areas KW - Fluorescence KW - Mass spectra KW - Rapana venosa KW - Rats KW - Total antioxidant capacity SP - 592 EP - 602 JF - Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) JO - Nutr Res VL - 35 IS - 7 N2 - In the recent years, the consumption of seafood has increased. There are no results on the studies of Rapana venosa (Rv) as a supplementation to the diets. We hypothesized that Rv would increase antioxidant capacity and reduce blood lipids, based on the composition of bioactive compounds and fatty acids. Therefore, the aim of this investigation was to evaluate in vitro and in vivo actions of Rv from contaminated (C) and non-C (NC) regions of collection on lipid profiles, antioxidant capacity, and enzyme activities in serum of rats fed an atherogenic diet. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups of 6 each and named control, cholesterol (Chol), Chol/RvC and Chol/RvNC. Rats of all 4 groups were fed the basal diet, which included wheat starch, casein, soybean oil, cellulose, vitamin (American Institute of Nutrition for laboratory animals vitamin mixtures), and mineral mixtures (American Institute of Nutrition for laboratory animals mineral mixtures). During 28 days of the experiment, the rats of the control group received the basal diet only, and the diets of the other 3 groups were supplemented with 1% of Chol, 1% of Chol, and 5% of Rv dry matter from C and NC areas. Dry matter from C and NC areas supplemented diets slightly hindered the rise in serum lipids vs. Chol group: total Chol, 13.18% and 11.63% and low-density lipoprotein Chol, 13.57% and 15.08%, respectively. Cholesterol significantly decreased the value of total antioxidant capacity. The supplementation of Rv to the Chol diet significantly affected the increase of antioxidant capacity in serum of rats, expressed by the 2,2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) method. The water extracts of Rv exhibited high binding properties with bovine serum albumin in comparison with quercetin. In conclusion, atherogenic diets supplemented with Rv from C and NC areas hindered both the rise in serum lipids levels and the decrease in the antioxidant capacity. Based on fluorescence and electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry profiles and in vivo studies, changes in the intensity of the found peaks were estimated in the serum samples after supplemented diets. These findings indicate that the supplementation of Rv to the atherogenic diets improve the lipid profiles and the antioxidant status in serum of rats. SN - 1879-0739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26048343/Rapana_venosa_consumption_improves_the_lipid_profiles_and_antioxidant_capacities_in_serum_of_rats_fed_an_atherogenic_diet_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0271-5317(15)00098-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -