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Gestational Weight Gain Trend and Population Attributable Risks of Adverse Fetal Growth Outcomes in Ohio.
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2015 Jul; 29(4):346-50.PP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The trend of gestational weight gain (GWG) in relation to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines and the population attributable risks (PARs) of GWG on fetal growth outcomes remain unclear.

METHODS

We analysed Ohio birth certificates from 2006 to 2012 to examine GWG trend by prepregnancy body mass index, to calculate the risk of small- and large-for-gestational age (SGA and LGA), and macrosomia (birthweight >4000 g or >4500 g) infants, and to estimate the PARs of GWG below or above the guidelines.

RESULTS

Of 869,531 women who delivered singleton live births at 22-44 weeks of gestation, 4.5% were underweight, 48.9% were normal weight, 23.9% were overweight, and 22.7% were obese before pregnancy. About 36.5% of underweight, 52.6% of normal weight, 72.5% of overweight, and 62.4% of obese women gained weight above the guidelines, with only slight changes from 2006 to 2012. Also, 34.9% of underweight, 20.1% of normal weight, 16.3% of overweight, and 27.0% of obese women gained weight below the guidelines. The PAR of GWG below or above the guidelines was -13% for SGA, 32.6% for LGA, 28.1% for macrosomia >4000 g, and 48.3% for macrosomia >4500 g, mostly driven by currently GWG above the guidelines in normal weight, overweight, and obese women.

CONCLUSIONS

A high percentage of pregnant women gained weight outside of the current IOM GWG guidelines; however, changes from 2006 to 2012 were small. GWG above the IOM guidelines significantly contributed to a large proportion of LGA and macrosomic infants in the general population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH.Department of Epidemiology and Social Science on Reproductive Health, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research, Shanghai, China.Department of Epidemiology and Social Science on Reproductive Health, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research, Shanghai, China.Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and Perinatal Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26053563

Citation

Chen, Aimin, et al. "Gestational Weight Gain Trend and Population Attributable Risks of Adverse Fetal Growth Outcomes in Ohio." Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, vol. 29, no. 4, 2015, pp. 346-50.
Chen A, Xu F, Xie C, et al. Gestational Weight Gain Trend and Population Attributable Risks of Adverse Fetal Growth Outcomes in Ohio. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2015;29(4):346-50.
Chen, A., Xu, F., Xie, C., Wu, T., Vuong, A. M., Miao, M., Yuan, W., & DeFranco, E. A. (2015). Gestational Weight Gain Trend and Population Attributable Risks of Adverse Fetal Growth Outcomes in Ohio. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, 29(4), 346-50. https://doi.org/10.1111/ppe.12197
Chen A, et al. Gestational Weight Gain Trend and Population Attributable Risks of Adverse Fetal Growth Outcomes in Ohio. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2015;29(4):346-50. PubMed PMID: 26053563.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gestational Weight Gain Trend and Population Attributable Risks of Adverse Fetal Growth Outcomes in Ohio. AU - Chen,Aimin, AU - Xu,Fan, AU - Xie,Changchun, AU - Wu,Tianying, AU - Vuong,Ann M, AU - Miao,Maohua, AU - Yuan,Wei, AU - DeFranco,Emily A, Y1 - 2015/06/05/ PY - 2015/6/9/entrez PY - 2015/6/9/pubmed PY - 2016/5/18/medline KW - body mass index KW - gestational weight gain KW - large-for-gestational age KW - macrosomia KW - small-for-gestational age SP - 346 EP - 50 JF - Paediatric and perinatal epidemiology JO - Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol VL - 29 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: The trend of gestational weight gain (GWG) in relation to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines and the population attributable risks (PARs) of GWG on fetal growth outcomes remain unclear. METHODS: We analysed Ohio birth certificates from 2006 to 2012 to examine GWG trend by prepregnancy body mass index, to calculate the risk of small- and large-for-gestational age (SGA and LGA), and macrosomia (birthweight >4000 g or >4500 g) infants, and to estimate the PARs of GWG below or above the guidelines. RESULTS: Of 869,531 women who delivered singleton live births at 22-44 weeks of gestation, 4.5% were underweight, 48.9% were normal weight, 23.9% were overweight, and 22.7% were obese before pregnancy. About 36.5% of underweight, 52.6% of normal weight, 72.5% of overweight, and 62.4% of obese women gained weight above the guidelines, with only slight changes from 2006 to 2012. Also, 34.9% of underweight, 20.1% of normal weight, 16.3% of overweight, and 27.0% of obese women gained weight below the guidelines. The PAR of GWG below or above the guidelines was -13% for SGA, 32.6% for LGA, 28.1% for macrosomia >4000 g, and 48.3% for macrosomia >4500 g, mostly driven by currently GWG above the guidelines in normal weight, overweight, and obese women. CONCLUSIONS: A high percentage of pregnant women gained weight outside of the current IOM GWG guidelines; however, changes from 2006 to 2012 were small. GWG above the IOM guidelines significantly contributed to a large proportion of LGA and macrosomic infants in the general population. SN - 1365-3016 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26053563/Gestational_Weight_Gain_Trend_and_Population_Attributable_Risks_of_Adverse_Fetal_Growth_Outcomes_in_Ohio_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/ppe.12197 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -