Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Sugar-sweetened beverage, diet soda, and fatty liver disease in the Framingham Heart Study cohorts.
J Hepatol. 2015 Aug; 63(2):462-9.JH

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease affects ∼30% of US adults, yet the role of sugar-sweetened beverages and diet soda on these diseases remains unknown. We examined the cross-sectional association between intake of sugar-sweetened beverages or diet soda and fatty liver disease in participants of the Framingham Offspring and Third Generation cohorts.

METHODS

Fatty liver disease was defined using liver attenuation measurements generated from computed tomography in 2634 participants. Alanine transaminase concentration, a crude marker of fatty liver disease, was measured in 5908 participants. Sugar-sweetened beverage and diet soda intake were estimated using a food frequency questionnaire. Participants were categorized as either non-consumers or consumers (3 categories: 1 serving/month to <1 serving/week, 1 serving/week to <1 serving/day, and ⩾1 serving/day) of sugar-sweetened beverages or diet soda.

RESULTS

After adjustment for age, sex, smoking status, Framingham cohort, energy intake, alcohol, dietary fiber, fat (% energy), protein (% energy), diet soda intake, and body mass index, the odds ratios of fatty liver disease were 1, 1.16 (0.88, 1.54), 1.32 (0.93, 1.86), and 1.61 (1.04, 2.49) across sugar-sweetened beverage consumption categories (p trend=0.04). Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption was also positively associated with alanine transaminase levels (p trend=0.007). We observed no significant association between diet soda intake and measures of fatty liver disease.

CONCLUSION

In conclusion, we observed that regular sugar-sweetened beverage consumption was associated with greater risk of fatty liver disease, particularly in overweight and obese individuals, whereas diet soda intake was not associated with measures of fatty liver disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, United States.NHLBI's Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA, United States; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, United States.University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, United States.Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States.USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, United States.USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, United States.USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, United States. Electronic address: nicola.mckeown@tufts.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26055949

Citation

Ma, Jiantao, et al. "Sugar-sweetened Beverage, Diet Soda, and Fatty Liver Disease in the Framingham Heart Study Cohorts." Journal of Hepatology, vol. 63, no. 2, 2015, pp. 462-9.
Ma J, Fox CS, Jacques PF, et al. Sugar-sweetened beverage, diet soda, and fatty liver disease in the Framingham Heart Study cohorts. J Hepatol. 2015;63(2):462-9.
Ma, J., Fox, C. S., Jacques, P. F., Speliotes, E. K., Hoffmann, U., Smith, C. E., Saltzman, E., & McKeown, N. M. (2015). Sugar-sweetened beverage, diet soda, and fatty liver disease in the Framingham Heart Study cohorts. Journal of Hepatology, 63(2), 462-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhep.2015.03.032
Ma J, et al. Sugar-sweetened Beverage, Diet Soda, and Fatty Liver Disease in the Framingham Heart Study Cohorts. J Hepatol. 2015;63(2):462-9. PubMed PMID: 26055949.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sugar-sweetened beverage, diet soda, and fatty liver disease in the Framingham Heart Study cohorts. AU - Ma,Jiantao, AU - Fox,Caroline S, AU - Jacques,Paul F, AU - Speliotes,Elizabeth K, AU - Hoffmann,Udo, AU - Smith,Caren E, AU - Saltzman,Edward, AU - McKeown,Nicola M, Y1 - 2015/06/05/ PY - 2014/11/09/received PY - 2015/03/01/revised PY - 2015/03/27/accepted PY - 2015/6/10/entrez PY - 2015/6/10/pubmed PY - 2016/5/25/medline KW - Alanine transaminase KW - Diet soda KW - Fatty liver disease KW - Sugar-sweetened beverages SP - 462 EP - 9 JF - Journal of hepatology JO - J Hepatol VL - 63 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease affects ∼30% of US adults, yet the role of sugar-sweetened beverages and diet soda on these diseases remains unknown. We examined the cross-sectional association between intake of sugar-sweetened beverages or diet soda and fatty liver disease in participants of the Framingham Offspring and Third Generation cohorts. METHODS: Fatty liver disease was defined using liver attenuation measurements generated from computed tomography in 2634 participants. Alanine transaminase concentration, a crude marker of fatty liver disease, was measured in 5908 participants. Sugar-sweetened beverage and diet soda intake were estimated using a food frequency questionnaire. Participants were categorized as either non-consumers or consumers (3 categories: 1 serving/month to <1 serving/week, 1 serving/week to <1 serving/day, and ⩾1 serving/day) of sugar-sweetened beverages or diet soda. RESULTS: After adjustment for age, sex, smoking status, Framingham cohort, energy intake, alcohol, dietary fiber, fat (% energy), protein (% energy), diet soda intake, and body mass index, the odds ratios of fatty liver disease were 1, 1.16 (0.88, 1.54), 1.32 (0.93, 1.86), and 1.61 (1.04, 2.49) across sugar-sweetened beverage consumption categories (p trend=0.04). Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption was also positively associated with alanine transaminase levels (p trend=0.007). We observed no significant association between diet soda intake and measures of fatty liver disease. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, we observed that regular sugar-sweetened beverage consumption was associated with greater risk of fatty liver disease, particularly in overweight and obese individuals, whereas diet soda intake was not associated with measures of fatty liver disease. SN - 1600-0641 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26055949/Sugar_sweetened_beverage_diet_soda_and_fatty_liver_disease_in_the_Framingham_Heart_Study_cohorts_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0168-8278(15)00240-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -