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The development of bystander intentions and social-moral reasoning about intergroup verbal aggression.
Br J Dev Psychol. 2015 Nov; 33(4):419-33.BJ

Abstract

A developmental intergroup approach was taken to examine the development of prosocial bystander intentions among children and adolescents. Participants as bystanders (N = 260) aged 8-10 and 13-15 years were presented with scenarios of direct aggression between individuals from different social groups (i.e., intergroup verbal aggression). These situations involved either an ingroup aggressor and an outgroup victim or an outgroup aggressor and an ingroup victim. This study focussed on the role of intergroup factors (group membership, ingroup identification, group norms, and social-moral reasoning) in the development of prosocial bystander intentions. Findings showed that prosocial bystander intentions declined with age. This effect was partially mediated by the ingroup norm to intervene and perceived severity of the verbal aggression. However, a moderated mediation analysis showed that only when the victim was an ingroup member and the aggressor an outgroup member did participants become more likely with age to report prosocial bystander intentions due to increased ingroup identification. Results also showed that younger children focussed on moral concerns and adolescents focussed more on psychological concerns when reasoning about their bystander intention. These novel findings help explain the developmental decline in prosocial bystander intentions from middle childhood into early adolescence when observing direct intergroup aggression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Goldsmiths, University of London, UK.Goldsmiths, University of London, UK.University of Kent, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26058823

Citation

Palmer, Sally B., et al. "The Development of Bystander Intentions and Social-moral Reasoning About Intergroup Verbal Aggression." The British Journal of Developmental Psychology, vol. 33, no. 4, 2015, pp. 419-33.
Palmer SB, Rutland A, Cameron L. The development of bystander intentions and social-moral reasoning about intergroup verbal aggression. Br J Dev Psychol. 2015;33(4):419-33.
Palmer, S. B., Rutland, A., & Cameron, L. (2015). The development of bystander intentions and social-moral reasoning about intergroup verbal aggression. The British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 33(4), 419-33. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjdp.12092
Palmer SB, Rutland A, Cameron L. The Development of Bystander Intentions and Social-moral Reasoning About Intergroup Verbal Aggression. Br J Dev Psychol. 2015;33(4):419-33. PubMed PMID: 26058823.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The development of bystander intentions and social-moral reasoning about intergroup verbal aggression. AU - Palmer,Sally B, AU - Rutland,Adam, AU - Cameron,Lindsey, Y1 - 2015/06/08/ PY - 2014/02/05/received PY - 2015/04/21/revised PY - 2015/6/11/entrez PY - 2015/6/11/pubmed PY - 2016/7/21/medline KW - aggression KW - bystander KW - childhood and adolescence KW - group processes KW - intergroup relations KW - social development KW - social-moral reasoning SP - 419 EP - 33 JF - The British journal of developmental psychology JO - Br J Dev Psychol VL - 33 IS - 4 N2 - A developmental intergroup approach was taken to examine the development of prosocial bystander intentions among children and adolescents. Participants as bystanders (N = 260) aged 8-10 and 13-15 years were presented with scenarios of direct aggression between individuals from different social groups (i.e., intergroup verbal aggression). These situations involved either an ingroup aggressor and an outgroup victim or an outgroup aggressor and an ingroup victim. This study focussed on the role of intergroup factors (group membership, ingroup identification, group norms, and social-moral reasoning) in the development of prosocial bystander intentions. Findings showed that prosocial bystander intentions declined with age. This effect was partially mediated by the ingroup norm to intervene and perceived severity of the verbal aggression. However, a moderated mediation analysis showed that only when the victim was an ingroup member and the aggressor an outgroup member did participants become more likely with age to report prosocial bystander intentions due to increased ingroup identification. Results also showed that younger children focussed on moral concerns and adolescents focussed more on psychological concerns when reasoning about their bystander intention. These novel findings help explain the developmental decline in prosocial bystander intentions from middle childhood into early adolescence when observing direct intergroup aggression. SN - 2044-835X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26058823/The_development_of_bystander_intentions_and_social_moral_reasoning_about_intergroup_verbal_aggression_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -