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Whole-grain foods and chronic disease: evidence from epidemiological and intervention studies.
Proc Nutr Soc. 2015 Aug; 74(3):313-9.PN

Abstract

Cereal-based foods are key components of the diet and they dominate most food-based dietary recommendations in order to achieve targets for intake of carbohydrate, protein and dietary fibre. Processing (milling) of grains to produce refined grain products removes key nutrients and phytochemicals from the flour and although in some countries nutrients may be replaced with mandatory fortification, overall this refinement reduces their potential nutritional quality. There is increasing evidence from both observational and intervention studies that increased intake of less-refined, whole-grain (WG) foods has positive health benefits. The highest WG consumers are consistently shown to have lower risk of developing CVD, type 2 diabetes and some cancers. WG consumers may also have better digestive health and are likely to have lower BMI and gain less weight over time. The bulk of the evidence for the benefits of WG comes from observational studies, but evidence of benefit in intervention studies and potential mechanisms of action is increasing. Overall this evidence supports the promotion of WG foods over refined grain foods in the diet, but this would require adoption of standard definitions of 'whole grain' and 'whole-grain foods' which will enable innovation by food manufacturers, provide clarity for the consumer and encourage the implementation of food-based dietary recommendations and public health strategies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Human Nutrition Research Centre,School of Agriculture Food and Rural Development,Newcastle University,Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU,UK.Human Nutrition Research Centre,School of Agriculture Food and Rural Development,Newcastle University,Singapore.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26062574

Citation

Seal, Chris J., and Iain A. Brownlee. "Whole-grain Foods and Chronic Disease: Evidence From Epidemiological and Intervention Studies." The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, vol. 74, no. 3, 2015, pp. 313-9.
Seal CJ, Brownlee IA. Whole-grain foods and chronic disease: evidence from epidemiological and intervention studies. Proc Nutr Soc. 2015;74(3):313-9.
Seal, C. J., & Brownlee, I. A. (2015). Whole-grain foods and chronic disease: evidence from epidemiological and intervention studies. The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 74(3), 313-9. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0029665115002104
Seal CJ, Brownlee IA. Whole-grain Foods and Chronic Disease: Evidence From Epidemiological and Intervention Studies. Proc Nutr Soc. 2015;74(3):313-9. PubMed PMID: 26062574.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Whole-grain foods and chronic disease: evidence from epidemiological and intervention studies. AU - Seal,Chris J, AU - Brownlee,Iain A, Y1 - 2015/06/11/ PY - 2015/6/12/entrez PY - 2015/6/13/pubmed PY - 2016/4/26/medline KW - Cancer risk KW - Cardiovascular health KW - Evidence-based nutrition KW - Type 2 diabetes KW - WG whole grain KW - Whole grain SP - 313 EP - 9 JF - The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society JO - Proc Nutr Soc VL - 74 IS - 3 N2 - Cereal-based foods are key components of the diet and they dominate most food-based dietary recommendations in order to achieve targets for intake of carbohydrate, protein and dietary fibre. Processing (milling) of grains to produce refined grain products removes key nutrients and phytochemicals from the flour and although in some countries nutrients may be replaced with mandatory fortification, overall this refinement reduces their potential nutritional quality. There is increasing evidence from both observational and intervention studies that increased intake of less-refined, whole-grain (WG) foods has positive health benefits. The highest WG consumers are consistently shown to have lower risk of developing CVD, type 2 diabetes and some cancers. WG consumers may also have better digestive health and are likely to have lower BMI and gain less weight over time. The bulk of the evidence for the benefits of WG comes from observational studies, but evidence of benefit in intervention studies and potential mechanisms of action is increasing. Overall this evidence supports the promotion of WG foods over refined grain foods in the diet, but this would require adoption of standard definitions of 'whole grain' and 'whole-grain foods' which will enable innovation by food manufacturers, provide clarity for the consumer and encourage the implementation of food-based dietary recommendations and public health strategies. SN - 1475-2719 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26062574/Whole_grain_foods_and_chronic_disease:_evidence_from_epidemiological_and_intervention_studies_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0029665115002104/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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