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Carrion crows learn to discriminate between calls of reliable and unreliable conspecifics.
Anim Cogn. 2015 Sep; 18(5):1181-5.AC

Abstract

Partner choice on the basis of an individual's reliability is expected to stabilize social interactions. In this experiment, we tested whether carrion crows (Corvus corone corone) learn to differentiate between calls of reliable or unreliable individuals. Crows were kept in an aviary that comprised four visually but not acoustically isolated compartments, separated by a central room. In an association phase, a dead crow placed in the central compartment was visible only to one of the four crow groups, whilst alert calls of a conspecific were played back. Therefore, these calls were reliable for that group, but unreliable for the three other groups. The procedure was repeated, using a different reliable caller for each group. In two test sessions, 1 month apart, reliable and unreliable model individuals were played back, but no dead crow was presented. We quantified birds' attention behaviour and the number of vocalisations emitted. In the association phase, crows were more attentive towards the reliable compared with the unreliable stimuli and called more in response to reliable compared to unreliable individuals. In the test and repeat phase, attention behaviour did not differ between reliability conditions, but the pattern of vocal behaviour reversed, with crows calling less frequent when listening to reliable compared with unreliable calls. Vocal responses of crows suggest that they can discriminate between reliable and unreliable callers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Ciencias Agro-Forestales Campus La Yutera, University of Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004, Palencia, Spain, claudia.wascher@gmail.com.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26067282

Citation

Wascher, Claudia A F., et al. "Carrion Crows Learn to Discriminate Between Calls of Reliable and Unreliable Conspecifics." Animal Cognition, vol. 18, no. 5, 2015, pp. 1181-5.
Wascher CA, Hillemann F, Canestrari D, et al. Carrion crows learn to discriminate between calls of reliable and unreliable conspecifics. Anim Cogn. 2015;18(5):1181-5.
Wascher, C. A., Hillemann, F., Canestrari, D., & Baglione, V. (2015). Carrion crows learn to discriminate between calls of reliable and unreliable conspecifics. Animal Cognition, 18(5), 1181-5. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-015-0879-8
Wascher CA, et al. Carrion Crows Learn to Discriminate Between Calls of Reliable and Unreliable Conspecifics. Anim Cogn. 2015;18(5):1181-5. PubMed PMID: 26067282.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Carrion crows learn to discriminate between calls of reliable and unreliable conspecifics. AU - Wascher,Claudia A F, AU - Hillemann,Friederike, AU - Canestrari,Daniela, AU - Baglione,Vittorio, Y1 - 2015/06/12/ PY - 2014/08/13/received PY - 2015/05/21/accepted PY - 2015/05/18/revised PY - 2015/6/13/entrez PY - 2015/6/13/pubmed PY - 2017/2/22/medline SP - 1181 EP - 5 JF - Animal cognition JO - Anim Cogn VL - 18 IS - 5 N2 - Partner choice on the basis of an individual's reliability is expected to stabilize social interactions. In this experiment, we tested whether carrion crows (Corvus corone corone) learn to differentiate between calls of reliable or unreliable individuals. Crows were kept in an aviary that comprised four visually but not acoustically isolated compartments, separated by a central room. In an association phase, a dead crow placed in the central compartment was visible only to one of the four crow groups, whilst alert calls of a conspecific were played back. Therefore, these calls were reliable for that group, but unreliable for the three other groups. The procedure was repeated, using a different reliable caller for each group. In two test sessions, 1 month apart, reliable and unreliable model individuals were played back, but no dead crow was presented. We quantified birds' attention behaviour and the number of vocalisations emitted. In the association phase, crows were more attentive towards the reliable compared with the unreliable stimuli and called more in response to reliable compared to unreliable individuals. In the test and repeat phase, attention behaviour did not differ between reliability conditions, but the pattern of vocal behaviour reversed, with crows calling less frequent when listening to reliable compared with unreliable calls. Vocal responses of crows suggest that they can discriminate between reliable and unreliable callers. SN - 1435-9456 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26067282/Carrion_crows_learn_to_discriminate_between_calls_of_reliable_and_unreliable_conspecifics_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-015-0879-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -