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Cognitive style modulates conscious but not unconscious thought: Comparing the deliberation-without-attention effect in analytics and wholists.
Conscious Cogn 2015; 36:54-60CC

Abstract

Unconscious thought theory (UTT) suggests that conscious thinking is less effective in complex decision-making than unconscious thinking. However, little research has taken individual differences (e.g., cognitive style) into account. Using an adapted UTT paradigm, the present study compared the performances of individuals with a wholist or an analytic cognitive style in both conscious and unconscious thought conditions. After viewing information regarding four hypothetical phones, participants in the conscious thought condition deliberated for three minutes before rating the phones, while participants in the unconscious thought condition were distracted with a 2-back task for three minutes before rating. The results showed that wholists were equally good at differentiating good and bad phones after conscious or unconscious thought, whereas analytics performed well only when thinking unconsciously. The modulation effect of cognitive style appeared only in conscious thought. Implications for UTT and the understanding of cognitive style are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028, China. Electronic address: jifanzhou@zju.edu.cn.Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028, China. Electronic address: 21339026@zju.edu.cn.Department of Psychology, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070, China. Electronic address: lijs@nwnu.edu.cn.Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028, China. Electronic address: mz3822@zju.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26069938

Citation

Zhou, Jifan, et al. "Cognitive Style Modulates Conscious but Not Unconscious Thought: Comparing the Deliberation-without-attention Effect in Analytics and Wholists." Consciousness and Cognition, vol. 36, 2015, pp. 54-60.
Zhou J, Zhou C, Li J, et al. Cognitive style modulates conscious but not unconscious thought: Comparing the deliberation-without-attention effect in analytics and wholists. Conscious Cogn. 2015;36:54-60.
Zhou, J., Zhou, C., Li, J., & Zhang, M. (2015). Cognitive style modulates conscious but not unconscious thought: Comparing the deliberation-without-attention effect in analytics and wholists. Consciousness and Cognition, 36, pp. 54-60. doi:10.1016/j.concog.2015.05.018.
Zhou J, et al. Cognitive Style Modulates Conscious but Not Unconscious Thought: Comparing the Deliberation-without-attention Effect in Analytics and Wholists. Conscious Cogn. 2015;36:54-60. PubMed PMID: 26069938.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cognitive style modulates conscious but not unconscious thought: Comparing the deliberation-without-attention effect in analytics and wholists. AU - Zhou,Jifan, AU - Zhou,Caiping, AU - Li,Jiansheng, AU - Zhang,Meng, Y1 - 2015/06/09/ PY - 2014/11/25/received PY - 2015/04/30/revised PY - 2015/05/26/accepted PY - 2015/6/13/entrez PY - 2015/6/13/pubmed PY - 2016/6/2/medline KW - Analytic KW - Cognitive style KW - Conscious thought KW - Deliberation-without-attention effect KW - Unconscious thought KW - Wholist SP - 54 EP - 60 JF - Consciousness and cognition JO - Conscious Cogn VL - 36 N2 - Unconscious thought theory (UTT) suggests that conscious thinking is less effective in complex decision-making than unconscious thinking. However, little research has taken individual differences (e.g., cognitive style) into account. Using an adapted UTT paradigm, the present study compared the performances of individuals with a wholist or an analytic cognitive style in both conscious and unconscious thought conditions. After viewing information regarding four hypothetical phones, participants in the conscious thought condition deliberated for three minutes before rating the phones, while participants in the unconscious thought condition were distracted with a 2-back task for three minutes before rating. The results showed that wholists were equally good at differentiating good and bad phones after conscious or unconscious thought, whereas analytics performed well only when thinking unconsciously. The modulation effect of cognitive style appeared only in conscious thought. Implications for UTT and the understanding of cognitive style are discussed. SN - 1090-2376 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26069938/Cognitive_style_modulates_conscious_but_not_unconscious_thought:_Comparing_the_deliberation_without_attention_effect_in_analytics_and_wholists_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1053-8100(15)00126-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -