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Diet patterns and risk of sepsis in community-dwelling adults: a cohort study.
BMC Infect Dis 2015; 15:231BI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Sepsis is the syndrome of body-wide inflammation triggered by infection and is a major public health problem. Diet plays a vital role in immune health but its association with sepsis in humans is unclear.

METHODS

We examined 21,404 participants with available dietary data from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, a national cohort of 30,239 black and white adults ≥45 years of age living in the US. The primary exposures of interest were five empirically derived diet patterns identified via factor analysis within REGARDS participants: "Convenience" (Chinese and Mexican foods, pasta, pizza, other mixed dishes), "Plant-based" (fruits, vegetables), "Southern" (added fats, fried foods, organ meats, sugar-sweetened beverages), "Sweets/Fats" (sugary foods) and "Alcohol/Salads" (alcohol, green-leafy vegetables, salad dressing). The main outcome of interest was investigator-adjudicated first hospitalized sepsis events.

RESULTS

A total of 970 first sepsis events were observed over ~6 years of follow-up. In unadjusted analyses, greater adherence to Sweets/Fats and Southern patterns was associated with higher cumulative incidence of sepsis, whereas greater adherence to the Plant-based pattern was associated with lower incidence. After adjustment for sociodemographic, lifestyle and clinical factors, greater adherence to the Southern pattern remained associated with higher risk of sepsis (hazard ratio [HR] comparing the fourth to first quartile, HR 1.39, 95 % CI 1.11,1.73). Race modified the association of the Southern diet pattern with sepsis (P interaction = 0.01), with the Southern pattern being associated with modestly higher adjusted risk of sepsis in black as compared to white participants (HR comparing fourth vs. first quartile HR 1.42, 95 % CI 0.75,2.67 vs. 1.21, 95 % CI 0.93,1.57, respectively).

CONCLUSION

A Southern pattern of eating was associated with higher risk of sepsis, particularly among black participants. Determining reasons for these findings may help to devise strategies to reduce sepsis risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, ZRB 614, 1720 2nd AVE S, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0006, USA. ogutierr@uab.edu. Departments of Epidemiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA. ogutierr@uab.edu.Departments of Biostatistics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA. sejudd@uab.edu.Department of Neurosciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. voeks@musc.edu.Departments of Epidemiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA. apcarson@uab.edu.Departments of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, ZRB 614, 1720 2nd AVE S, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0006, USA. msafford@uabmc.edu.Departments of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, ZRB 614, 1720 2nd AVE S, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0006, USA. jshikany@uabmc.edu.Departments of Emergency Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26072206

Citation

Gutiérrez, Orlando M., et al. "Diet Patterns and Risk of Sepsis in Community-dwelling Adults: a Cohort Study." BMC Infectious Diseases, vol. 15, 2015, p. 231.
Gutiérrez OM, Judd SE, Voeks JH, et al. Diet patterns and risk of sepsis in community-dwelling adults: a cohort study. BMC Infect Dis. 2015;15:231.
Gutiérrez, O. M., Judd, S. E., Voeks, J. H., Carson, A. P., Safford, M. M., Shikany, J. M., & Wang, H. E. (2015). Diet patterns and risk of sepsis in community-dwelling adults: a cohort study. BMC Infectious Diseases, 15, p. 231. doi:10.1186/s12879-015-0981-1.
Gutiérrez OM, et al. Diet Patterns and Risk of Sepsis in Community-dwelling Adults: a Cohort Study. BMC Infect Dis. 2015 Jun 14;15:231. PubMed PMID: 26072206.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diet patterns and risk of sepsis in community-dwelling adults: a cohort study. AU - Gutiérrez,Orlando M, AU - Judd,Suzanne E, AU - Voeks,Jenifer H, AU - Carson,April P, AU - Safford,Monika M, AU - Shikany,James M, AU - Wang,Henry E, Y1 - 2015/06/14/ PY - 2015/03/16/received PY - 2015/06/09/accepted PY - 2015/6/15/entrez PY - 2015/6/15/pubmed PY - 2015/12/19/medline SP - 231 EP - 231 JF - BMC infectious diseases JO - BMC Infect. Dis. VL - 15 N2 - BACKGROUND: Sepsis is the syndrome of body-wide inflammation triggered by infection and is a major public health problem. Diet plays a vital role in immune health but its association with sepsis in humans is unclear. METHODS: We examined 21,404 participants with available dietary data from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, a national cohort of 30,239 black and white adults ≥45 years of age living in the US. The primary exposures of interest were five empirically derived diet patterns identified via factor analysis within REGARDS participants: "Convenience" (Chinese and Mexican foods, pasta, pizza, other mixed dishes), "Plant-based" (fruits, vegetables), "Southern" (added fats, fried foods, organ meats, sugar-sweetened beverages), "Sweets/Fats" (sugary foods) and "Alcohol/Salads" (alcohol, green-leafy vegetables, salad dressing). The main outcome of interest was investigator-adjudicated first hospitalized sepsis events. RESULTS: A total of 970 first sepsis events were observed over ~6 years of follow-up. In unadjusted analyses, greater adherence to Sweets/Fats and Southern patterns was associated with higher cumulative incidence of sepsis, whereas greater adherence to the Plant-based pattern was associated with lower incidence. After adjustment for sociodemographic, lifestyle and clinical factors, greater adherence to the Southern pattern remained associated with higher risk of sepsis (hazard ratio [HR] comparing the fourth to first quartile, HR 1.39, 95 % CI 1.11,1.73). Race modified the association of the Southern diet pattern with sepsis (P interaction = 0.01), with the Southern pattern being associated with modestly higher adjusted risk of sepsis in black as compared to white participants (HR comparing fourth vs. first quartile HR 1.42, 95 % CI 0.75,2.67 vs. 1.21, 95 % CI 0.93,1.57, respectively). CONCLUSION: A Southern pattern of eating was associated with higher risk of sepsis, particularly among black participants. Determining reasons for these findings may help to devise strategies to reduce sepsis risk. SN - 1471-2334 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26072206/Diet_patterns_and_risk_of_sepsis_in_community_dwelling_adults:_a_cohort_study_ L2 - https://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12879-015-0981-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -