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Consumption of fruit and vegetables reduces risk of pancreatic cancer: evidence from epidemiological studies.

Abstract

Observational studies have reported inconsistent results on the association between fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer. We carried out a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies to summarize available evidence. We searched PubMed, Scopus, and ISI Web of Science databases for relevant studies published until the end of January 2015. Fixed-effects and random-effects models were used to estimate the summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer. A total of 15 case-control studies, eight prospective studies, and one pooled analysis fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The summary RR for the highest versus the lowest intake was 0.73 (95% CI=0.53-1.00) for fruit and vegetables, 0.73 (95% CI=0.63-0.84) for fruit, and 0.76 (95% CI=0.69-0.83) for vegetables, with significant heterogeneities (I=70.5, 55.7, and 43.0%, respectively). Inverse associations were observed in the stratified analysis by study design, although the results of prospective studies showed borderline significance, with corresponding RR=0.90 (95% CI=0.77-1.05) for fruit and vegetable intake, 0.93 (95% CI=0.83-1.03) for fruit intake, and 0.89 (95% CI=0.80-1.00) for vegetable intake. Besides, significant inverse associations were observed in the majority of other subgroup analyses by study quality, geographic location, exposure assessment method, and adjustment for potential confounders. Findings from the present meta-analysis support that fruit and vegetable intake is associated inversely with the risk of pancreatic cancer. However, study design may play a key role in the observed magnitude of the aforementioned association. Future well-designed prospective studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    aDepartment of Clinical Epidemiology bDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, China cCenter for Clinical and Translational Science, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

    , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    China
    Diet
    Epidemiologic Studies
    Fruit
    Humans
    Meta-Analysis as Topic
    Pancreatic Neoplasms
    Prognosis
    Risk Factors
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26075658

    Citation

    Wu, Qi-Jun, et al. "Consumption of Fruit and Vegetables Reduces Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: Evidence From Epidemiological Studies." European Journal of Cancer Prevention : the Official Journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP), vol. 25, no. 3, 2016, pp. 196-205.
    Wu QJ, Wu L, Zheng LQ, et al. Consumption of fruit and vegetables reduces risk of pancreatic cancer: evidence from epidemiological studies. Eur J Cancer Prev. 2016;25(3):196-205.
    Wu, Q. J., Wu, L., Zheng, L. Q., Xu, X., Ji, C., & Gong, T. T. (2016). Consumption of fruit and vegetables reduces risk of pancreatic cancer: evidence from epidemiological studies. European Journal of Cancer Prevention : the Official Journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP), 25(3), pp. 196-205. doi:10.1097/CEJ.0000000000000171.
    Wu QJ, et al. Consumption of Fruit and Vegetables Reduces Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: Evidence From Epidemiological Studies. Eur J Cancer Prev. 2016;25(3):196-205. PubMed PMID: 26075658.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Consumption of fruit and vegetables reduces risk of pancreatic cancer: evidence from epidemiological studies. AU - Wu,Qi-Jun, AU - Wu,Lang, AU - Zheng,Li-Qiang, AU - Xu,Xin, AU - Ji,Chao, AU - Gong,Ting-Ting, PY - 2015/6/16/entrez PY - 2015/6/16/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline SP - 196 EP - 205 JF - European journal of cancer prevention : the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) JO - Eur. J. Cancer Prev. VL - 25 IS - 3 N2 - Observational studies have reported inconsistent results on the association between fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer. We carried out a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies to summarize available evidence. We searched PubMed, Scopus, and ISI Web of Science databases for relevant studies published until the end of January 2015. Fixed-effects and random-effects models were used to estimate the summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer. A total of 15 case-control studies, eight prospective studies, and one pooled analysis fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The summary RR for the highest versus the lowest intake was 0.73 (95% CI=0.53-1.00) for fruit and vegetables, 0.73 (95% CI=0.63-0.84) for fruit, and 0.76 (95% CI=0.69-0.83) for vegetables, with significant heterogeneities (I=70.5, 55.7, and 43.0%, respectively). Inverse associations were observed in the stratified analysis by study design, although the results of prospective studies showed borderline significance, with corresponding RR=0.90 (95% CI=0.77-1.05) for fruit and vegetable intake, 0.93 (95% CI=0.83-1.03) for fruit intake, and 0.89 (95% CI=0.80-1.00) for vegetable intake. Besides, significant inverse associations were observed in the majority of other subgroup analyses by study quality, geographic location, exposure assessment method, and adjustment for potential confounders. Findings from the present meta-analysis support that fruit and vegetable intake is associated inversely with the risk of pancreatic cancer. However, study design may play a key role in the observed magnitude of the aforementioned association. Future well-designed prospective studies are warranted to confirm these findings. SN - 1473-5709 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26075658/full_citation L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=26075658 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -