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Energy Intake, Profile, and Dietary Sources in the Spanish Population: Findings of the ANIBES Study.
Nutrients. 2015 Jun 12; 7(6):4739-62.N

Abstract

Energy intake, and the foods and beverages contributing to that, are considered key to understanding the high obesity prevalence worldwide. The relative contributions of energy intake and expenditure to the obesity epidemic, however, remain poorly defined in Spain. The purpose of this study was to contribute to updating data of dietary energy intake and its main sources from food and beverages, according to gender and age. These data were derived from the ANIBES ("Anthropometry, Intake, and Energy Balance in Spain") study, a cross-sectional study of a nationally representative sample of the Spanish population (from 9-75 years old). A three-day dietary record, collected by means of a tablet device, was used to obtain information about food and beverage consumption and leftovers. The final sample comprised 2009 individuals (1,013 men, 996 women). The observed mean dietary energy intake was 7.6 ± 2.11 MJ/day (8.2 ± 2.22 MJ/day for men and 6.9 ± 1.79 MJ/day for women). The highest intakes were observed among adolescents aged 13-17 years (8.4 MJ/day), followed by children 9-12 years (8.2 ± 1.80 MJ/day), adults aged 18-64 (7.6 ± 2.14 MJ/day) and older adults aged 65-75 years (6.8 ± 1.88 MJ/day). Cereals or grains (27.4%), meats and derivatives (15.2%), oils and fats (12.3%), and milk and dairy products (11.8%) contributed most to daily energy intake. Energy contributions from non-alcoholic beverages (3.9%), fish and shellfish (3.6%), sugars and sweets (3.3%) and alcoholic beverages (2.6%) were moderate to minor. Contributions to caloric profile were 16.8%E from proteins; 41.1%E from carbohydrates, including 1.4%E from fiber; 38.5%E from fats; and 1.9%E from alcohol intake. We can conclude that energy intake is decreasing in the Spanish population. A variety of food and beverage groups contribute to energy intake; however, it is necessary to reinforce efforts for better adherence to the traditional Mediterranean diet.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Spanish Nutrition Foundation (FEN), C/General Álvarez de Castro 20, 1ªpta, 28010 Madrid, Spain. eruiz@fen.org.es.Spanish Nutrition Foundation (FEN), C/General Álvarez de Castro 20, 1ªpta, 28010 Madrid, Spain. jmavila@fen.org.es.Spanish Nutrition Foundation (FEN), C/General Álvarez de Castro 20, 1ªpta, 28010 Madrid, Spain. tvalero@fen.org.es.Spanish Nutrition Foundation (FEN), C/General Álvarez de Castro 20, 1ªpta, 28010 Madrid, Spain. susanadelpozo@fen.org.es.Spanish Nutrition Foundation (FEN), C/General Álvarez de Castro 20, 1ªpta, 28010 Madrid, Spain. prodriguez@fen.org.es.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Navarra, C/Irunlarrea 1, 31008 Pamplona, Spain. jaranceta@unav.es.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II and Institute of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Granada, Campus de la Salud, Avda. del Conocimiento, 18100 Armilla, Granada, Spain. agil@ugr.es.ImFINE Research Group, Department of Health and Human Performance, Technical University of Madrid, C/Martín Fierro 7, 28040 Madrid, Spain. marcela.gonzalez.gross@upm.es.Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Pharmacy, Complutense University of Madrid, Plaza Ramón y Cajal s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain. rortega@ucm.es.Research Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, C/Doctor Pasteur s/n Trasera del Hospital, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain. lluis.serra@ulpgc.es.Spanish Nutrition Foundation (FEN), C/General Álvarez de Castro 20, 1ªpta, 28010 Madrid, Spain. gvarela@ceu.es. Department of Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, CEU San Pablo University, Urb. Montepríncipe, Crta. Boadilla Km. 5.3, 28668 Boadilla del Monte, Madrid, Spain. gvarela@ceu.es.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26076230

Citation

Ruiz, Emma, et al. "Energy Intake, Profile, and Dietary Sources in the Spanish Population: Findings of the ANIBES Study." Nutrients, vol. 7, no. 6, 2015, pp. 4739-62.
Ruiz E, Ávila JM, Valero T, et al. Energy Intake, Profile, and Dietary Sources in the Spanish Population: Findings of the ANIBES Study. Nutrients. 2015;7(6):4739-62.
Ruiz, E., Ávila, J. M., Valero, T., del Pozo, S., Rodriguez, P., Aranceta-Bartrina, J., Gil, Á., González-Gross, M., Ortega, R. M., Serra-Majem, L., & Varela-Moreiras, G. (2015). Energy Intake, Profile, and Dietary Sources in the Spanish Population: Findings of the ANIBES Study. Nutrients, 7(6), 4739-62. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu7064739
Ruiz E, et al. Energy Intake, Profile, and Dietary Sources in the Spanish Population: Findings of the ANIBES Study. Nutrients. 2015 Jun 12;7(6):4739-62. PubMed PMID: 26076230.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Energy Intake, Profile, and Dietary Sources in the Spanish Population: Findings of the ANIBES Study. AU - Ruiz,Emma, AU - Ávila,José Manuel, AU - Valero,Teresa, AU - del Pozo,Susana, AU - Rodriguez,Paula, AU - Aranceta-Bartrina,Javier, AU - Gil,Ángel, AU - González-Gross,Marcela, AU - Ortega,Rosa M, AU - Serra-Majem,Lluis, AU - Varela-Moreiras,Gregorio, Y1 - 2015/06/12/ PY - 2015/04/29/received PY - 2015/05/18/revised PY - 2015/05/28/accepted PY - 2015/6/16/entrez PY - 2015/6/16/pubmed PY - 2016/5/4/medline KW - ANIBES study KW - dietary energy sources KW - dietary surveys KW - energy intake KW - food intake SP - 4739 EP - 62 JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 7 IS - 6 N2 - Energy intake, and the foods and beverages contributing to that, are considered key to understanding the high obesity prevalence worldwide. The relative contributions of energy intake and expenditure to the obesity epidemic, however, remain poorly defined in Spain. The purpose of this study was to contribute to updating data of dietary energy intake and its main sources from food and beverages, according to gender and age. These data were derived from the ANIBES ("Anthropometry, Intake, and Energy Balance in Spain") study, a cross-sectional study of a nationally representative sample of the Spanish population (from 9-75 years old). A three-day dietary record, collected by means of a tablet device, was used to obtain information about food and beverage consumption and leftovers. The final sample comprised 2009 individuals (1,013 men, 996 women). The observed mean dietary energy intake was 7.6 ± 2.11 MJ/day (8.2 ± 2.22 MJ/day for men and 6.9 ± 1.79 MJ/day for women). The highest intakes were observed among adolescents aged 13-17 years (8.4 MJ/day), followed by children 9-12 years (8.2 ± 1.80 MJ/day), adults aged 18-64 (7.6 ± 2.14 MJ/day) and older adults aged 65-75 years (6.8 ± 1.88 MJ/day). Cereals or grains (27.4%), meats and derivatives (15.2%), oils and fats (12.3%), and milk and dairy products (11.8%) contributed most to daily energy intake. Energy contributions from non-alcoholic beverages (3.9%), fish and shellfish (3.6%), sugars and sweets (3.3%) and alcoholic beverages (2.6%) were moderate to minor. Contributions to caloric profile were 16.8%E from proteins; 41.1%E from carbohydrates, including 1.4%E from fiber; 38.5%E from fats; and 1.9%E from alcohol intake. We can conclude that energy intake is decreasing in the Spanish population. A variety of food and beverage groups contribute to energy intake; however, it is necessary to reinforce efforts for better adherence to the traditional Mediterranean diet. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26076230/Energy_Intake_Profile_and_Dietary_Sources_in_the_Spanish_Population:_Findings_of_the_ANIBES_Study_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu7064739 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -