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Prospective study of coffee consumption and all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular mortality in Swedish women.
Eur J Epidemiol 2015; 30(9):1027-34EJ

Abstract

We investigated whether coffee consumption was associated with all-cause, cancer, or cardiovascular mortality in a prospective cohort of 49,259 Swedish women. Of the 1576 deaths that occurred in the cohort, 956 were due to cancer and 158 were due to cardiovascular disease. We used Cox proportional hazard models with adjustment for potential confounders to estimate multivariable relative risks (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Compared to a coffee consumption of 0-1 cups/day, the RR for all cause-mortality was 0.81 (95 % CI 0.69-0.94) for 2-5 cups/day and 0.88 (95 % CI 0.74-1.05) for >5 cups/day. Coffee consumption was not associated with cancer mortality or cardiovascular mortality when analyzed in the entire cohort. However, in supplementary analyses of women over 50 years of age, the RR for all cause-mortality was 0.74 (95 % CI 0.62-0.89) for 2-5 cups/day and 0.86 (95 % CI 0.70-1.06) for >5 cups/day when compared to 0-1 cups/day. In this same subgroup, the RRs for cancer mortality were 1.06 (95 % CI 0.81-1.38) for 2-5 cups/day and 1.40 (95 % CI 1.05-1.89) for >5 cups/day when compared to 0-1 cups/day. No associations between coffee consumption and all-cause mortality, cancer mortality, or cardiovascular mortality were observed among women below 50 years of age. In conclusion, higher coffee consumption was associated with lower all-cause mortality when compared to a consumption of 0-1 cups/day. Furthermore, coffee may have differential effects on mortality before and after 50 years of age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, NOVUM, 141 83, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. marie.lof@ki.se.Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. Samfundet Folkhälsan, Helsinki, Finland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26076920

Citation

Löf, Marie, et al. "Prospective Study of Coffee Consumption and All-cause, Cancer, and Cardiovascular Mortality in Swedish Women." European Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 30, no. 9, 2015, pp. 1027-34.
Löf M, Sandin S, Yin L, et al. Prospective study of coffee consumption and all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular mortality in Swedish women. Eur J Epidemiol. 2015;30(9):1027-34.
Löf, M., Sandin, S., Yin, L., Adami, H. O., & Weiderpass, E. (2015). Prospective study of coffee consumption and all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular mortality in Swedish women. European Journal of Epidemiology, 30(9), pp. 1027-34. doi:10.1007/s10654-015-0052-3.
Löf M, et al. Prospective Study of Coffee Consumption and All-cause, Cancer, and Cardiovascular Mortality in Swedish Women. Eur J Epidemiol. 2015;30(9):1027-34. PubMed PMID: 26076920.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prospective study of coffee consumption and all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular mortality in Swedish women. AU - Löf,Marie, AU - Sandin,Sven, AU - Yin,Li, AU - Adami,Hans-Olov, AU - Weiderpass,Elisabete, Y1 - 2015/06/16/ PY - 2014/12/28/received PY - 2015/05/28/accepted PY - 2015/6/17/entrez PY - 2015/6/17/pubmed PY - 2016/1/9/medline KW - All-cause mortality KW - Cancer mortality KW - Cardiovascular mortality KW - Coffee KW - Cohort SP - 1027 EP - 34 JF - European journal of epidemiology JO - Eur. J. Epidemiol. VL - 30 IS - 9 N2 - We investigated whether coffee consumption was associated with all-cause, cancer, or cardiovascular mortality in a prospective cohort of 49,259 Swedish women. Of the 1576 deaths that occurred in the cohort, 956 were due to cancer and 158 were due to cardiovascular disease. We used Cox proportional hazard models with adjustment for potential confounders to estimate multivariable relative risks (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Compared to a coffee consumption of 0-1 cups/day, the RR for all cause-mortality was 0.81 (95 % CI 0.69-0.94) for 2-5 cups/day and 0.88 (95 % CI 0.74-1.05) for >5 cups/day. Coffee consumption was not associated with cancer mortality or cardiovascular mortality when analyzed in the entire cohort. However, in supplementary analyses of women over 50 years of age, the RR for all cause-mortality was 0.74 (95 % CI 0.62-0.89) for 2-5 cups/day and 0.86 (95 % CI 0.70-1.06) for >5 cups/day when compared to 0-1 cups/day. In this same subgroup, the RRs for cancer mortality were 1.06 (95 % CI 0.81-1.38) for 2-5 cups/day and 1.40 (95 % CI 1.05-1.89) for >5 cups/day when compared to 0-1 cups/day. No associations between coffee consumption and all-cause mortality, cancer mortality, or cardiovascular mortality were observed among women below 50 years of age. In conclusion, higher coffee consumption was associated with lower all-cause mortality when compared to a consumption of 0-1 cups/day. Furthermore, coffee may have differential effects on mortality before and after 50 years of age. SN - 1573-7284 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26076920/Prospective_study_of_coffee_consumption_and_all_cause_cancer_and_cardiovascular_mortality_in_Swedish_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10654-015-0052-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -