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The Relationship of Anticipatory Gluteus Medius Activity to Pelvic and Knee Stability in the Transition to Single-Leg Stance.
PM R. 2016 Feb; 8(2):138-44.PM R

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The knee abduction moment in a weight-bearing limb is an important risk factor of conditions such as patellofemoral pain and knee osteoarthritis. Excessive pelvic drop in single-leg stance can increase the knee abduction moment. The gluteus medius muscle is crucial to prevent pelvic drop and must be activated in anticipation of the transition from double-leg to single-leg stance.

OBJECTIVE

To examine the relationship of anticipatory activity of the gluteus medius to pelvic drop and knee abduction moment.

DESIGN

Observational, cross-sectional correlational study.

SETTING

Research laboratory.

PARTICIPANTS

Twenty female adults (mean age 22.6 years, standard deviation 2.5) were recruited and fully participated. Participant selection was limited to healthy women who did not have a history of knee and ankle ligament injuries, any indication of knee, hip, and/or low back pain, and/or knowledge of the proper squat technique.

METHODS

Participants performed 16 single-leg mini squats on their nondominant leg.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

The onset and magnitude of anticipatory gluteus medius activity were measured in relation to toe-off of the dominant leg during the transition from double-leg to single-leg stance. Preplanned correlations between anticipatory gluteus medius onset and its activation magnitude, pelvic obliquity, and knee abduction moment were examined.

RESULTS

The magnitude of anticipatory gluteus medius activity was significantly correlated with the knee abduction moment (rs (18) = -0.303, P < .001) and pelvic obliquity (rs (18) = 0.361, P < .001), whereas gluteus medius onset was not significantly correlated with either knee abduction moment or pelvic obliquity.

CONCLUSIONS

The amount of gluteus medius activity is more important for controlling knee and pelvic stability in the frontal plane than the onset of activation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Kinesiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada(∗)(†)(‡).College of Kinesiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada(∗)(†)(‡).College of Kinesiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada(∗)(†)(‡).College of Kinesiology, University of Saskatchewan, 87 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5B2, Canada(¶). Electronic address: alison.oates@usask.ca.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26079865

Citation

Kim, Daehan, et al. "The Relationship of Anticipatory Gluteus Medius Activity to Pelvic and Knee Stability in the Transition to Single-Leg Stance." PM & R : the Journal of Injury, Function, and Rehabilitation, vol. 8, no. 2, 2016, pp. 138-44.
Kim D, Unger J, Lanovaz JL, et al. The Relationship of Anticipatory Gluteus Medius Activity to Pelvic and Knee Stability in the Transition to Single-Leg Stance. PM R. 2016;8(2):138-44.
Kim, D., Unger, J., Lanovaz, J. L., & Oates, A. R. (2016). The Relationship of Anticipatory Gluteus Medius Activity to Pelvic and Knee Stability in the Transition to Single-Leg Stance. PM & R : the Journal of Injury, Function, and Rehabilitation, 8(2), 138-44. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmrj.2015.06.005
Kim D, et al. The Relationship of Anticipatory Gluteus Medius Activity to Pelvic and Knee Stability in the Transition to Single-Leg Stance. PM R. 2016;8(2):138-44. PubMed PMID: 26079865.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Relationship of Anticipatory Gluteus Medius Activity to Pelvic and Knee Stability in the Transition to Single-Leg Stance. AU - Kim,Daehan, AU - Unger,Janelle, AU - Lanovaz,Joel L, AU - Oates,Alison R, Y1 - 2015/06/14/ PY - 2015/01/02/received PY - 2015/05/29/revised PY - 2015/06/05/accepted PY - 2015/6/17/entrez PY - 2015/6/17/pubmed PY - 2016/12/20/medline SP - 138 EP - 44 JF - PM & R : the journal of injury, function, and rehabilitation JO - PM R VL - 8 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: The knee abduction moment in a weight-bearing limb is an important risk factor of conditions such as patellofemoral pain and knee osteoarthritis. Excessive pelvic drop in single-leg stance can increase the knee abduction moment. The gluteus medius muscle is crucial to prevent pelvic drop and must be activated in anticipation of the transition from double-leg to single-leg stance. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship of anticipatory activity of the gluteus medius to pelvic drop and knee abduction moment. DESIGN: Observational, cross-sectional correlational study. SETTING: Research laboratory. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty female adults (mean age 22.6 years, standard deviation 2.5) were recruited and fully participated. Participant selection was limited to healthy women who did not have a history of knee and ankle ligament injuries, any indication of knee, hip, and/or low back pain, and/or knowledge of the proper squat technique. METHODS: Participants performed 16 single-leg mini squats on their nondominant leg. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The onset and magnitude of anticipatory gluteus medius activity were measured in relation to toe-off of the dominant leg during the transition from double-leg to single-leg stance. Preplanned correlations between anticipatory gluteus medius onset and its activation magnitude, pelvic obliquity, and knee abduction moment were examined. RESULTS: The magnitude of anticipatory gluteus medius activity was significantly correlated with the knee abduction moment (rs (18) = -0.303, P < .001) and pelvic obliquity (rs (18) = 0.361, P < .001), whereas gluteus medius onset was not significantly correlated with either knee abduction moment or pelvic obliquity. CONCLUSIONS: The amount of gluteus medius activity is more important for controlling knee and pelvic stability in the frontal plane than the onset of activation. SN - 1934-1563 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26079865/The_Relationship_of_Anticipatory_Gluteus_Medius_Activity_to_Pelvic_and_Knee_Stability_in_the_Transition_to_Single_Leg_Stance_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1934-1482(15)00291-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -