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Prevalence and Mental Health Correlates of Insomnia in First-Encounter Veterans with and without Military Sexual Trauma.
Sleep. 2015 Oct 01; 38(10):1547-54.S

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES

There is limited information about prevalence of insomnia in general populations of veterans of recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. No studies have examined insomnia in veterans with military sexual trauma (MST). We assess prevalence of insomnia, identify types of services sought by veterans with insomnia, and examine correlates of insomnia in veterans with and without MST.

DESIGN

A cross-sectional study of first-encounter veterans registering to establish care.

SETTING

Veteran Affairs San Diego Healthcare System.

PARTICIPANTS

Nine hundred seventeen veterans completed questionnaires assessing insomnia, MST, service needs, traumatic brain injury, resilience, and symptoms of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), pain, alcohol misuse, and hypomania.

INTERVENTIONS

N/A.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS

53.1% of veterans without MST and 60.8% of veterans with MST had clinically significant insomnia symptoms, with the MST subsample reporting more severe symptoms, P < 0.05. Insomnia was more prevalent than depression, hypomania, PTSD, and substance misuse. Veterans with insomnia were more likely to seek care for physical health problems and primary care versus mental health concerns, P < 0.001. For the veteran sample without MST, age, combat service, traumatic brain injury, pain, and depression were associated with worse insomnia, P < 0.001. For the MST subsample, employment status, pain, and depression were associated with worse insomnia, P < 0.001.

CONCLUSIONS

Study findings indicate a higher rate of insomnia in veterans compared to what has been found in the general population. Insomnia is more prevalent, and more severe, in veterans with military sexual trauma. Routine insomnia assessments and referrals to providers who can provide evidence-based treatment are crucial.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA. Research Service, VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA.Psychology Services, VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA. Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health (CESAMH), San Diego, CA.Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA. Research Service, VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA. Psychology Services, VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA. Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health (CESAMH), San Diego, CA. National Center for PTSD, White River Junction, VT.Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA. Psychology Services, VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA. Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health (CESAMH), San Diego, CA.Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA. Psychology Services, VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA. Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health (CESAMH), San Diego, CA.Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA. Psychology Services, VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA. Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health (CESAMH), San Diego, CA. School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26085301

Citation

Jenkins, Melissa M., et al. "Prevalence and Mental Health Correlates of Insomnia in First-Encounter Veterans With and Without Military Sexual Trauma." Sleep, vol. 38, no. 10, 2015, pp. 1547-54.
Jenkins MM, Colvonen PJ, Norman SB, et al. Prevalence and Mental Health Correlates of Insomnia in First-Encounter Veterans with and without Military Sexual Trauma. Sleep. 2015;38(10):1547-54.
Jenkins, M. M., Colvonen, P. J., Norman, S. B., Afari, N., Allard, C. B., & Drummond, S. P. (2015). Prevalence and Mental Health Correlates of Insomnia in First-Encounter Veterans with and without Military Sexual Trauma. Sleep, 38(10), 1547-54. https://doi.org/10.5665/sleep.5044
Jenkins MM, et al. Prevalence and Mental Health Correlates of Insomnia in First-Encounter Veterans With and Without Military Sexual Trauma. Sleep. 2015 Oct 1;38(10):1547-54. PubMed PMID: 26085301.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence and Mental Health Correlates of Insomnia in First-Encounter Veterans with and without Military Sexual Trauma. AU - Jenkins,Melissa M, AU - Colvonen,Peter J, AU - Norman,Sonya B, AU - Afari,Niloofar, AU - Allard,Carolyn B, AU - Drummond,Sean P A, Y1 - 2015/10/01/ PY - 2014/11/06/received PY - 2015/04/13/received PY - 2015/6/19/entrez PY - 2015/6/19/pubmed PY - 2016/3/11/medline KW - insomnia KW - military sexual trauma KW - prevalence KW - veterans SP - 1547 EP - 54 JF - Sleep JO - Sleep VL - 38 IS - 10 N2 - STUDY OBJECTIVES: There is limited information about prevalence of insomnia in general populations of veterans of recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. No studies have examined insomnia in veterans with military sexual trauma (MST). We assess prevalence of insomnia, identify types of services sought by veterans with insomnia, and examine correlates of insomnia in veterans with and without MST. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study of first-encounter veterans registering to establish care. SETTING: Veteran Affairs San Diego Healthcare System. PARTICIPANTS: Nine hundred seventeen veterans completed questionnaires assessing insomnia, MST, service needs, traumatic brain injury, resilience, and symptoms of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), pain, alcohol misuse, and hypomania. INTERVENTIONS: N/A. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: 53.1% of veterans without MST and 60.8% of veterans with MST had clinically significant insomnia symptoms, with the MST subsample reporting more severe symptoms, P < 0.05. Insomnia was more prevalent than depression, hypomania, PTSD, and substance misuse. Veterans with insomnia were more likely to seek care for physical health problems and primary care versus mental health concerns, P < 0.001. For the veteran sample without MST, age, combat service, traumatic brain injury, pain, and depression were associated with worse insomnia, P < 0.001. For the MST subsample, employment status, pain, and depression were associated with worse insomnia, P < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Study findings indicate a higher rate of insomnia in veterans compared to what has been found in the general population. Insomnia is more prevalent, and more severe, in veterans with military sexual trauma. Routine insomnia assessments and referrals to providers who can provide evidence-based treatment are crucial. SN - 1550-9109 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26085301/Prevalence_and_Mental_Health_Correlates_of_Insomnia_in_First_Encounter_Veterans_with_and_without_Military_Sexual_Trauma_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article-lookup/doi/10.5665/sleep.5044 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -