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Sentence intelligibility during segmental interruption and masking by speech-modulated noise: Effects of age and hearing loss.
J Acoust Soc Am. 2015 Jun; 137(6):3487-501.JA

Abstract

This study investigated how single-talker modulated noise impacts consonant and vowel cues to sentence intelligibility. Younger normal-hearing, older normal-hearing, and older hearing-impaired listeners completed speech recognition tests. All listeners received spectrally shaped speech matched to their individual audiometric thresholds to ensure sufficient audibility with the exception of a second younger listener group who received spectral shaping that matched the mean audiogram of the hearing-impaired listeners. Results demonstrated minimal declines in intelligibility for older listeners with normal hearing and more evident declines for older hearing-impaired listeners, possibly related to impaired temporal processing. A correlational analysis suggests a common underlying ability to process information during vowels that is predictive of speech-in-modulated noise abilities. Whereas, the ability to use consonant cues appears specific to the particular characteristics of the noise and interruption. Performance declines for older listeners were mostly confined to consonant conditions. Spectral shaping accounted for the primary contributions of audibility. However, comparison with the young spectral controls who received identical spectral shaping suggests that this procedure may reduce wideband temporal modulation cues due to frequency-specific amplification that affected high-frequency consonants more than low-frequency vowels. These spectral changes may impact speech intelligibility in certain modulation masking conditions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of South Carolina, 1224 Sumter Street, Columbia, South Carolina 29208, USA.Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, 135 Rutledge Avenue, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA.Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, 135 Rutledge Avenue, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA.Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, 135 Rutledge Avenue, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26093436

Citation

Fogerty, Daniel, et al. "Sentence Intelligibility During Segmental Interruption and Masking By Speech-modulated Noise: Effects of Age and Hearing Loss." The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 137, no. 6, 2015, pp. 3487-501.
Fogerty D, Ahlstrom JB, Bologna WJ, et al. Sentence intelligibility during segmental interruption and masking by speech-modulated noise: Effects of age and hearing loss. J Acoust Soc Am. 2015;137(6):3487-501.
Fogerty, D., Ahlstrom, J. B., Bologna, W. J., & Dubno, J. R. (2015). Sentence intelligibility during segmental interruption and masking by speech-modulated noise: Effects of age and hearing loss. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 137(6), 3487-501. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.4921603
Fogerty D, et al. Sentence Intelligibility During Segmental Interruption and Masking By Speech-modulated Noise: Effects of Age and Hearing Loss. J Acoust Soc Am. 2015;137(6):3487-501. PubMed PMID: 26093436.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sentence intelligibility during segmental interruption and masking by speech-modulated noise: Effects of age and hearing loss. AU - Fogerty,Daniel, AU - Ahlstrom,Jayne B, AU - Bologna,William J, AU - Dubno,Judy R, PY - 2015/6/22/entrez PY - 2015/6/22/pubmed PY - 2016/3/22/medline SP - 3487 EP - 501 JF - The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America JO - J Acoust Soc Am VL - 137 IS - 6 N2 - This study investigated how single-talker modulated noise impacts consonant and vowel cues to sentence intelligibility. Younger normal-hearing, older normal-hearing, and older hearing-impaired listeners completed speech recognition tests. All listeners received spectrally shaped speech matched to their individual audiometric thresholds to ensure sufficient audibility with the exception of a second younger listener group who received spectral shaping that matched the mean audiogram of the hearing-impaired listeners. Results demonstrated minimal declines in intelligibility for older listeners with normal hearing and more evident declines for older hearing-impaired listeners, possibly related to impaired temporal processing. A correlational analysis suggests a common underlying ability to process information during vowels that is predictive of speech-in-modulated noise abilities. Whereas, the ability to use consonant cues appears specific to the particular characteristics of the noise and interruption. Performance declines for older listeners were mostly confined to consonant conditions. Spectral shaping accounted for the primary contributions of audibility. However, comparison with the young spectral controls who received identical spectral shaping suggests that this procedure may reduce wideband temporal modulation cues due to frequency-specific amplification that affected high-frequency consonants more than low-frequency vowels. These spectral changes may impact speech intelligibility in certain modulation masking conditions. SN - 1520-8524 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26093436/Sentence_intelligibility_during_segmental_interruption_and_masking_by_speech_modulated_noise:_Effects_of_age_and_hearing_loss_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1121/1.4921603 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -