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Prenatal exposure to phthalates and neuropsychological development during childhood.
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2015 Aug; 218(6):550-8.IJ

Abstract

There is inconsistent evidence regarding the effects of prenatal phthalate exposure on children's neuropsychological development. We evaluate the association between prenatal phthalate exposure and the cognitive, psychomotor and behavioral development of 367 children at repeated ages in a prospective birth cohort study. We measured phthalate metabolites (sum of four DEHP metabolites - Σ4DEHP, MBzP, MEP, MiBP and MnBP) in urine samples collected during the 1st and 3rd trimesters of pregnancy in women participating in the INMA-Sabadell birth cohort study. We assessed cognitive and psychomotor development of their children at 1 and 4 years, and social competence, ADHD symptoms and other behavioral problems at 4 and 7 years. No associations were observed between prenatal phthalate exposure and cognitive and psychomotor scores at the age of 1 year and at the age of 4 years, except for an association between MBzP and lower psychomotor scores (β=-1.49 [95% confidence interval (CI)=-2.78, -0.21]). Σ4DEHP concentrations were associated with increased social competence scores at 4 years and with reduced ADHD symptoms at age 4 and 7 years. Increasing MEP concentrations were associated with a reduced risk of inattention symptoms at 4 years. No associations were observed for MBzP, MiBP or MnBP in relation to behavioral problems. This study, with multiple phthalate exposure measurements and measures of neuropsychological domains at different ages, suggest that prenatal phthalate exposure does not adversely affect children's cognitive, psychomotor or behavioral development.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: mgascon@creal.cat.Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain; Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: dvalvi@creal.cat.Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain; Department of Genes and Environment, Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: jforns@creal.cat.Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: mcasas@creal.cat.Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: dmartinez@creal.cat.Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: jjulvez@creal.cat.IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: nmonfort@imim.es.Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain; IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: rventura@imim.es.Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain; IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: jsunyer@creal.cat.Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: mvrijheid@creal.cat.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26095249

Citation

Gascon, Mireia, et al. "Prenatal Exposure to Phthalates and Neuropsychological Development During Childhood." International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health, vol. 218, no. 6, 2015, pp. 550-8.
Gascon M, Valvi D, Forns J, et al. Prenatal exposure to phthalates and neuropsychological development during childhood. Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2015;218(6):550-8.
Gascon, M., Valvi, D., Forns, J., Casas, M., Martínez, D., Júlvez, J., Monfort, N., Ventura, R., Sunyer, J., & Vrijheid, M. (2015). Prenatal exposure to phthalates and neuropsychological development during childhood. International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health, 218(6), 550-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheh.2015.05.006
Gascon M, et al. Prenatal Exposure to Phthalates and Neuropsychological Development During Childhood. Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2015;218(6):550-8. PubMed PMID: 26095249.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal exposure to phthalates and neuropsychological development during childhood. AU - Gascon,Mireia, AU - Valvi,Damaskini, AU - Forns,Joan, AU - Casas,Maribel, AU - Martínez,David, AU - Júlvez,Jordi, AU - Monfort,Núria, AU - Ventura,Rosa, AU - Sunyer,Jordi, AU - Vrijheid,Martine, Y1 - 2015/05/19/ PY - 2015/03/27/received PY - 2015/05/11/revised PY - 2015/05/12/accepted PY - 2015/6/23/entrez PY - 2015/6/23/pubmed PY - 2016/4/16/medline KW - Behavior KW - Children KW - Cognition KW - Neuropsychological development KW - Phthalates SP - 550 EP - 8 JF - International journal of hygiene and environmental health JO - Int J Hyg Environ Health VL - 218 IS - 6 N2 - There is inconsistent evidence regarding the effects of prenatal phthalate exposure on children's neuropsychological development. We evaluate the association between prenatal phthalate exposure and the cognitive, psychomotor and behavioral development of 367 children at repeated ages in a prospective birth cohort study. We measured phthalate metabolites (sum of four DEHP metabolites - Σ4DEHP, MBzP, MEP, MiBP and MnBP) in urine samples collected during the 1st and 3rd trimesters of pregnancy in women participating in the INMA-Sabadell birth cohort study. We assessed cognitive and psychomotor development of their children at 1 and 4 years, and social competence, ADHD symptoms and other behavioral problems at 4 and 7 years. No associations were observed between prenatal phthalate exposure and cognitive and psychomotor scores at the age of 1 year and at the age of 4 years, except for an association between MBzP and lower psychomotor scores (β=-1.49 [95% confidence interval (CI)=-2.78, -0.21]). Σ4DEHP concentrations were associated with increased social competence scores at 4 years and with reduced ADHD symptoms at age 4 and 7 years. Increasing MEP concentrations were associated with a reduced risk of inattention symptoms at 4 years. No associations were observed for MBzP, MiBP or MnBP in relation to behavioral problems. This study, with multiple phthalate exposure measurements and measures of neuropsychological domains at different ages, suggest that prenatal phthalate exposure does not adversely affect children's cognitive, psychomotor or behavioral development. SN - 1618-131X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26095249/Prenatal_exposure_to_phthalates_and_neuropsychological_development_during_childhood_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1438-4639(15)00068-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -