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Vitamin Intake from Food Supplements in a German Cohort - Is there a Risk of Excessive Intake?
Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2014; 84(3-4):152-62.IJ

Abstract

Food supplements, if not properly used, may lead to potentially harmful nutrient intake. The purpose of this survey was to examine vitamin intake from food supplements. Taking into account the intake from food, as obtained from the National Nutrition Survey, it was determined whether the tolerable upper intake levels (ULs) were exceeded via supplements alone, or in combination with food. Data from 1070 supplement users (18-93 years) was available. The dietary and supplemental vitamin intakes of three groups were analyzed: average intake (50th percentile food+50th percentile supplements), middle-high intake (50th+95th) and high intake (95th+95th). Vitamin C (53%), vitamin E (45%) and B vitamins (37-45%) were consumed most frequently. Few subjects (n=7) reached or exceeded the ULs through supplements alone. The UL for vitamin A and folate was reached by a few men in the middle-high group, and by a few men and women in the high intake group. Otherwise, even in the high intake group, the recommended vitamin D intake of 20 µg/day (in case of insufficient endogenous synthesis) could not be achieved. The use of food supplements was not associated with excessive vitamin intake in this survey, except in a small number of cases. Vitamin A intake above the UL was the result of high dietary intake which also included the intake of β-carotene, rather than the result of overconsumption of food supplements. Diets mainly included folate from natural sources, which has no associated risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Institute of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Leibniz University Hannover, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26098479

Citation

Willers, Janina, et al. "Vitamin Intake From Food Supplements in a German Cohort - Is There a Risk of Excessive Intake?" International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research. Internationale Zeitschrift Fur Vitamin- Und Ernahrungsforschung. Journal International De Vitaminologie Et De Nutrition, vol. 84, no. 3-4, 2014, pp. 152-62.
Willers J, Heinemann M, Bitterlich N, et al. Vitamin Intake from Food Supplements in a German Cohort - Is there a Risk of Excessive Intake? Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2014;84(3-4):152-62.
Willers, J., Heinemann, M., Bitterlich, N., & Hahn, A. (2014). Vitamin Intake from Food Supplements in a German Cohort - Is there a Risk of Excessive Intake? International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research. Internationale Zeitschrift Fur Vitamin- Und Ernahrungsforschung. Journal International De Vitaminologie Et De Nutrition, 84(3-4), 152-62. https://doi.org/10.1024/0300-9831/a000202
Willers J, et al. Vitamin Intake From Food Supplements in a German Cohort - Is There a Risk of Excessive Intake. Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2014;84(3-4):152-62. PubMed PMID: 26098479.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin Intake from Food Supplements in a German Cohort - Is there a Risk of Excessive Intake? AU - Willers,Janina, AU - Heinemann,Michaela, AU - Bitterlich,Norman, AU - Hahn,Andreas, PY - 2015/6/23/entrez PY - 2015/6/23/pubmed PY - 2015/8/8/medline KW - Tolerable Upper Intake Level KW - excessive intake KW - food supplements KW - survey KW - vitamins SP - 152 EP - 62 JF - International journal for vitamin and nutrition research. Internationale Zeitschrift fur Vitamin- und Ernahrungsforschung. Journal international de vitaminologie et de nutrition JO - Int J Vitam Nutr Res VL - 84 IS - 3-4 N2 - Food supplements, if not properly used, may lead to potentially harmful nutrient intake. The purpose of this survey was to examine vitamin intake from food supplements. Taking into account the intake from food, as obtained from the National Nutrition Survey, it was determined whether the tolerable upper intake levels (ULs) were exceeded via supplements alone, or in combination with food. Data from 1070 supplement users (18-93 years) was available. The dietary and supplemental vitamin intakes of three groups were analyzed: average intake (50th percentile food+50th percentile supplements), middle-high intake (50th+95th) and high intake (95th+95th). Vitamin C (53%), vitamin E (45%) and B vitamins (37-45%) were consumed most frequently. Few subjects (n=7) reached or exceeded the ULs through supplements alone. The UL for vitamin A and folate was reached by a few men in the middle-high group, and by a few men and women in the high intake group. Otherwise, even in the high intake group, the recommended vitamin D intake of 20 µg/day (in case of insufficient endogenous synthesis) could not be achieved. The use of food supplements was not associated with excessive vitamin intake in this survey, except in a small number of cases. Vitamin A intake above the UL was the result of high dietary intake which also included the intake of β-carotene, rather than the result of overconsumption of food supplements. Diets mainly included folate from natural sources, which has no associated risk. SN - 0300-9831 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26098479/Vitamin_Intake_from_Food_Supplements_in_a_German_Cohort___Is_there_a_Risk_of_Excessive_Intake L2 - http://econtent.hogrefe.com/doi/full/10.1024/0300-9831/a000202?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -