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Rhinovirus-C detection in children presenting with acute respiratory infection to hospital in Brazil.
J Med Virol. 2016 Jan; 88(1):58-63.JM

Abstract

Human rhinovirus (RV) is a common cause of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in children. We aimed to characterize the clinical and demographic features associated with different RV species detected in children attending hospital with ARI, from low-income families in North-east Brazil. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 630 children <5 years with ARI. Clinical diagnosis and disease severity were also recorded. Samples were analyzed by multiplex PCR for 18 viral and atypical bacterial pathogens; RV positive samples underwent partial sequencing to determine species and type. RV was the fourth commonest pathogen accounting for 18.7% of pathogens detected. RV was commonly detected in children with bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and asthma/episodic viral wheeze (EVW). Species and type were assigned in 112 cases (73% RV-A; 27% RV-C; 0% RV-B). Generally, there were no differences in clinical or demographic characteristics between those infected with RV-A and RV-C. However, in children with asthma/EVW, RV-C was detected relatively more frequently than RV-A (23% vs. 5%; P = 0.04). Our findings highlight RV as a potentially important pathogen in this setting. Generally, clinical and demographic features were similar in children in whom RV-A and C species were detected. However, RV-C was more frequently found in children with asthma/EVW than RV-A.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Child Health, Alder Hey Children's Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom.School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.Instituto de Medicina Integral Prof. Fernando Figueira (IMIP), Recife, Brazil.Instituto de Medicina Integral Prof. Fernando Figueira (IMIP), Recife, Brazil.Department of Paediatrics and Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Wisconsin.Department of Paediatrics and Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Wisconsin.School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.Institute of Child Health, Alder Hey Children's Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26100591

Citation

Fawkner-Corbett, David W., et al. "Rhinovirus-C Detection in Children Presenting With Acute Respiratory Infection to Hospital in Brazil." Journal of Medical Virology, vol. 88, no. 1, 2016, pp. 58-63.
Fawkner-Corbett DW, Khoo SK, Duarte CM, et al. Rhinovirus-C detection in children presenting with acute respiratory infection to hospital in Brazil. J Med Virol. 2016;88(1):58-63.
Fawkner-Corbett, D. W., Khoo, S. K., Duarte, C. M., Bezerra, P. G., Bochkov, Y. A., Gern, J. E., Le Souef, P. N., & McNamara, P. S. (2016). Rhinovirus-C detection in children presenting with acute respiratory infection to hospital in Brazil. Journal of Medical Virology, 88(1), 58-63. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.24300
Fawkner-Corbett DW, et al. Rhinovirus-C Detection in Children Presenting With Acute Respiratory Infection to Hospital in Brazil. J Med Virol. 2016;88(1):58-63. PubMed PMID: 26100591.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rhinovirus-C detection in children presenting with acute respiratory infection to hospital in Brazil. AU - Fawkner-Corbett,David W, AU - Khoo,Siew Kim, AU - Duarte,Carminha M, AU - Bezerra,Patricia G M, AU - Bochkov,Yury A, AU - Gern,James E, AU - Le Souef,Peter N, AU - McNamara,Paul S, PY - 2015/06/15/accepted PY - 2015/6/24/entrez PY - 2015/6/24/pubmed PY - 2016/8/6/medline KW - asthma KW - bronchiolitis KW - child KW - pneumonia KW - respiratory tract infections KW - rhinovirus SP - 58 EP - 63 JF - Journal of medical virology JO - J Med Virol VL - 88 IS - 1 N2 - Human rhinovirus (RV) is a common cause of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in children. We aimed to characterize the clinical and demographic features associated with different RV species detected in children attending hospital with ARI, from low-income families in North-east Brazil. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 630 children <5 years with ARI. Clinical diagnosis and disease severity were also recorded. Samples were analyzed by multiplex PCR for 18 viral and atypical bacterial pathogens; RV positive samples underwent partial sequencing to determine species and type. RV was the fourth commonest pathogen accounting for 18.7% of pathogens detected. RV was commonly detected in children with bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and asthma/episodic viral wheeze (EVW). Species and type were assigned in 112 cases (73% RV-A; 27% RV-C; 0% RV-B). Generally, there were no differences in clinical or demographic characteristics between those infected with RV-A and RV-C. However, in children with asthma/EVW, RV-C was detected relatively more frequently than RV-A (23% vs. 5%; P = 0.04). Our findings highlight RV as a potentially important pathogen in this setting. Generally, clinical and demographic features were similar in children in whom RV-A and C species were detected. However, RV-C was more frequently found in children with asthma/EVW than RV-A. SN - 1096-9071 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26100591/Rhinovirus_C_detection_in_children_presenting_with_acute_respiratory_infection_to_hospital_in_Brazil_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -