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Evaluating the Structure of Early English Literacy Skills in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children.
J Deaf Stud Deaf Educ. 2015 Oct; 20(4):343-55.JD

Abstract

Better understanding the mechanisms underlying developing literacy has promoted the development of more effective reading interventions for typically developing children. Such knowledge may facilitate effective instruction of deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children. Hence, the current study examined the multivariate associations among phonological awareness, alphabetic knowledge, word reading, and vocabulary skills in DHH children who have auditory access to speech. One hundred and sixty-seven DHH children (M age = 60.43 months) were assessed with a battery of early literacy measures. Forty-six percent used at least 1 cochlear implant; 54% were fitted with hearing aids. About a fourth of the sample was acquiring both spoken English and sign. Scores on standardized tests of phonological awareness and vocabulary averaged at least 1 standard deviation (SD) below the mean of the hearing norming sample. Confirmatory factor analyses showed that DHH children's early literacy skills were best characterized by a complex 3-factor model in which phonological awareness, alphabetic knowledge, and vocabulary formed 3 separate, but highly correlated constructs, with letter-sound knowledge and word reading skills relating to both phonological awareness and alphabetic knowledge. This supports the hypothesis that early reading of DHH children with functional hearing is qualitatively similar to that of hearing children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Georgia State University and epemyw@gsu.edu.Georgia State University and.Georgia State University and.Arizona State University.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26109317

Citation

Webb, Mi-Young, et al. "Evaluating the Structure of Early English Literacy Skills in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children." Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, vol. 20, no. 4, 2015, pp. 343-55.
Webb MY, Lederberg AR, Branum-Martin L, et al. Evaluating the Structure of Early English Literacy Skills in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children. J Deaf Stud Deaf Educ. 2015;20(4):343-55.
Webb, M. Y., Lederberg, A. R., Branum-Martin, L., & McDonald Connor, C. (2015). Evaluating the Structure of Early English Literacy Skills in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children. Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 20(4), 343-55. https://doi.org/10.1093/deafed/env024
Webb MY, et al. Evaluating the Structure of Early English Literacy Skills in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children. J Deaf Stud Deaf Educ. 2015;20(4):343-55. PubMed PMID: 26109317.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluating the Structure of Early English Literacy Skills in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children. AU - Webb,Mi-Young, AU - Lederberg,Amy R, AU - Branum-Martin,Lee, AU - McDonald Connor,Carol, Y1 - 2015/06/24/ PY - 2015/03/24/received PY - 2015/05/28/accepted PY - 2015/6/26/entrez PY - 2015/6/26/pubmed PY - 2016/5/26/medline SP - 343 EP - 55 JF - Journal of deaf studies and deaf education JO - J Deaf Stud Deaf Educ VL - 20 IS - 4 N2 - Better understanding the mechanisms underlying developing literacy has promoted the development of more effective reading interventions for typically developing children. Such knowledge may facilitate effective instruction of deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children. Hence, the current study examined the multivariate associations among phonological awareness, alphabetic knowledge, word reading, and vocabulary skills in DHH children who have auditory access to speech. One hundred and sixty-seven DHH children (M age = 60.43 months) were assessed with a battery of early literacy measures. Forty-six percent used at least 1 cochlear implant; 54% were fitted with hearing aids. About a fourth of the sample was acquiring both spoken English and sign. Scores on standardized tests of phonological awareness and vocabulary averaged at least 1 standard deviation (SD) below the mean of the hearing norming sample. Confirmatory factor analyses showed that DHH children's early literacy skills were best characterized by a complex 3-factor model in which phonological awareness, alphabetic knowledge, and vocabulary formed 3 separate, but highly correlated constructs, with letter-sound knowledge and word reading skills relating to both phonological awareness and alphabetic knowledge. This supports the hypothesis that early reading of DHH children with functional hearing is qualitatively similar to that of hearing children. SN - 1465-7325 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26109317/Evaluating_the_Structure_of_Early_English_Literacy_Skills_in_Deaf_and_Hard_of_Hearing_Children_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jdsde/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/deafed/env024 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -