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High Cholesterol Awareness, Treatment, and Control Among Hispanic/Latinos: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
J Am Heart Assoc. 2015 Jun 24; 4(7)JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We assessed high cholesterol (HC) awareness, treatment, and control rates among US Hispanic/Latino adults and describe factors associated with HC awareness and management.

METHODS AND RESULTS

Baseline data (collected 2008-2011) from a multisite probability sample of Hispanic/Latino adults in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (18 to 74 years old; N=16 207) were analyzed. HC was defined as low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ≥130 mg/dL and/or total cholesterol ≥240 mg/dL or use of cholesterol-lowering medication. Among Hispanic/Latino adults with HC, almost half (49.3%) were not aware of their condition and only 29.5% were receiving treatment. Men had a higher HC prevalence than women (44.0% versus 40.5%) but a lower rate of treatment (28.1% versus 30.6%). Younger adults were significantly less likely to be HC aware compared to those who were older. Those with hypertension, diabetes, and high socioeconomic position were more likely to be HC aware. US-born Hispanic/Latino were more likely to be HC unaware than foreign-born Hispanics/Latinos, but longer US residency was significantly associated with being HC aware, treated, and controlled. Cholesterol control was achieved among 64.3% of those who were HC treated. However, younger adults, women, those with lower income, those uninsured, and more recent immigrants were less likely to be HC controlled. Individuals of Puerto Rican or Dominican background were most likely to be HC aware and treated, whereas those of Mexican or Central American background were least likely to be HC treated. Individuals of Cuban and South American background had the lowest rates of HC control, whereas Puerto Ricans had the highest.

CONCLUSIONS

Understanding gaps in HC awareness, treatment, and control among US Hispanic/Latino adults can help inform physicians and policymakers to improve disease management and patient education programs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine and Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (C.J.R., K.S.).Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (J.C.).Department of Medicine and Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (C.J.R., K.S.).Department of Neurology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (H.M.G., L.M.W.).Department of Medicine, San Diego State, San Diego, CA (G.A.T.).Department of Neurology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (H.M.G., L.M.W.).Department of Epidemiology and Community Health, Albert Einstein School of Medicine, Bronx, NY (S.W.S., R.K.).Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (D.L.J.).Department of Epidemiology and Community Health, Albert Einstein School of Medicine, Bronx, NY (S.W.S., R.K.).Department of Medicine, Institute for Minority Health Research, University of Illinois at Chicago, IL (M.L.D.).

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26109505

Citation

Rodriguez, Carlos J., et al. "High Cholesterol Awareness, Treatment, and Control Among Hispanic/Latinos: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos." Journal of the American Heart Association, vol. 4, no. 7, 2015.
Rodriguez CJ, Cai J, Swett K, et al. High Cholesterol Awareness, Treatment, and Control Among Hispanic/Latinos: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. J Am Heart Assoc. 2015;4(7).
Rodriguez, C. J., Cai, J., Swett, K., González, H. M., Talavera, G. A., Wruck, L. M., Wassertheil-Smoller, S., Lloyd-Jones, D., Kaplan, R., & Daviglus, M. L. (2015). High Cholesterol Awareness, Treatment, and Control Among Hispanic/Latinos: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Journal of the American Heart Association, 4(7). https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.115.001867
Rodriguez CJ, et al. High Cholesterol Awareness, Treatment, and Control Among Hispanic/Latinos: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. J Am Heart Assoc. 2015 Jun 24;4(7) PubMed PMID: 26109505.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High Cholesterol Awareness, Treatment, and Control Among Hispanic/Latinos: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. AU - Rodriguez,Carlos J, AU - Cai,Jianwen, AU - Swett,Katrina, AU - González,Hector M, AU - Talavera,Gregory A, AU - Wruck,Lisa M, AU - Wassertheil-Smoller,Sylvia, AU - Lloyd-Jones,Donald, AU - Kaplan,Robert, AU - Daviglus,Martha L, Y1 - 2015/06/24/ PY - 2015/6/26/entrez PY - 2015/6/26/pubmed PY - 2016/4/21/medline KW - cholesterol KW - epidemiology KW - health disparities KW - high‐risk populations JF - Journal of the American Heart Association JO - J Am Heart Assoc VL - 4 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: We assessed high cholesterol (HC) awareness, treatment, and control rates among US Hispanic/Latino adults and describe factors associated with HC awareness and management. METHODS AND RESULTS: Baseline data (collected 2008-2011) from a multisite probability sample of Hispanic/Latino adults in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (18 to 74 years old; N=16 207) were analyzed. HC was defined as low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ≥130 mg/dL and/or total cholesterol ≥240 mg/dL or use of cholesterol-lowering medication. Among Hispanic/Latino adults with HC, almost half (49.3%) were not aware of their condition and only 29.5% were receiving treatment. Men had a higher HC prevalence than women (44.0% versus 40.5%) but a lower rate of treatment (28.1% versus 30.6%). Younger adults were significantly less likely to be HC aware compared to those who were older. Those with hypertension, diabetes, and high socioeconomic position were more likely to be HC aware. US-born Hispanic/Latino were more likely to be HC unaware than foreign-born Hispanics/Latinos, but longer US residency was significantly associated with being HC aware, treated, and controlled. Cholesterol control was achieved among 64.3% of those who were HC treated. However, younger adults, women, those with lower income, those uninsured, and more recent immigrants were less likely to be HC controlled. Individuals of Puerto Rican or Dominican background were most likely to be HC aware and treated, whereas those of Mexican or Central American background were least likely to be HC treated. Individuals of Cuban and South American background had the lowest rates of HC control, whereas Puerto Ricans had the highest. CONCLUSIONS: Understanding gaps in HC awareness, treatment, and control among US Hispanic/Latino adults can help inform physicians and policymakers to improve disease management and patient education programs. SN - 2047-9980 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26109505/High_Cholesterol_Awareness_Treatment_and_Control_Among_Hispanic/Latinos:_Results_From_the_Hispanic_Community_Health_Study/Study_of_Latinos_ L2 - https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/JAHA.115.001867?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -