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Google Flu Trends in Canada: a comparison of digital disease surveillance data with physician consultations and respiratory virus surveillance data, 2010-2014.
Epidemiol Infect. 2016 Jan; 144(2):325-32.EI

Abstract

The value of Google Flu Trends (GFT) remains unclear after it overestimated the proportion of physician visits related to influenza-like illness (ILI) in the United States in 2012-2013. However, GFT estimates (%GFT) have not been examined nationally in Canada nor compared with positivity for respiratory viruses other than influenza. For 2010-2014, we compared %GFT for Canada to Public Health Agency of Canada ILI consultation rates (%PHAC) and to positivity for influenza A and B, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus (hMPV), and rhinoviruses. %GFT correlated well with %PHAC (ρ = 0·77-0·90) and influenza A positivity (ρ = 0·64-0·96) and overestimated the 2012-2013 %PHAC peak by 0·99 percentage points. %GFT peaks corresponded temporally with peaks in positivity for influenza A and rhinoviruses (all seasons) and RSV and hMPV when their peaks preceded influenza peaks. In Canada, %GFT represented traditional surveillance data and corresponded temporally with patterns in circulating respiratory viruses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Alberta,Edmonton,Alberta,Canada.University of Alberta,Edmonton,Alberta,Canada.University of Alberta,Edmonton,Alberta,Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26135239

Citation

Martin, L J., et al. "Google Flu Trends in Canada: a Comparison of Digital Disease Surveillance Data With Physician Consultations and Respiratory Virus Surveillance Data, 2010-2014." Epidemiology and Infection, vol. 144, no. 2, 2016, pp. 325-32.
Martin LJ, Lee BE, Yasui Y. Google Flu Trends in Canada: a comparison of digital disease surveillance data with physician consultations and respiratory virus surveillance data, 2010-2014. Epidemiol Infect. 2016;144(2):325-32.
Martin, L. J., Lee, B. E., & Yasui, Y. (2016). Google Flu Trends in Canada: a comparison of digital disease surveillance data with physician consultations and respiratory virus surveillance data, 2010-2014. Epidemiology and Infection, 144(2), 325-32. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0950268815001478
Martin LJ, Lee BE, Yasui Y. Google Flu Trends in Canada: a Comparison of Digital Disease Surveillance Data With Physician Consultations and Respiratory Virus Surveillance Data, 2010-2014. Epidemiol Infect. 2016;144(2):325-32. PubMed PMID: 26135239.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Google Flu Trends in Canada: a comparison of digital disease surveillance data with physician consultations and respiratory virus surveillance data, 2010-2014. AU - Martin,L J, AU - Lee,B E, AU - Yasui,Y, Y1 - 2015/07/02/ PY - 2015/7/3/entrez PY - 2015/7/3/pubmed PY - 2016/3/26/medline KW - Public health KW - respiratory infections KW - surveillance SP - 325 EP - 32 JF - Epidemiology and infection JO - Epidemiol. Infect. VL - 144 IS - 2 N2 - The value of Google Flu Trends (GFT) remains unclear after it overestimated the proportion of physician visits related to influenza-like illness (ILI) in the United States in 2012-2013. However, GFT estimates (%GFT) have not been examined nationally in Canada nor compared with positivity for respiratory viruses other than influenza. For 2010-2014, we compared %GFT for Canada to Public Health Agency of Canada ILI consultation rates (%PHAC) and to positivity for influenza A and B, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus (hMPV), and rhinoviruses. %GFT correlated well with %PHAC (ρ = 0·77-0·90) and influenza A positivity (ρ = 0·64-0·96) and overestimated the 2012-2013 %PHAC peak by 0·99 percentage points. %GFT peaks corresponded temporally with peaks in positivity for influenza A and rhinoviruses (all seasons) and RSV and hMPV when their peaks preceded influenza peaks. In Canada, %GFT represented traditional surveillance data and corresponded temporally with patterns in circulating respiratory viruses. SN - 1469-4409 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26135239/Google_Flu_Trends_in_Canada:_a_comparison_of_digital_disease_surveillance_data_with_physician_consultations_and_respiratory_virus_surveillance_data_2010_2014_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0950268815001478/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -