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Green tea, black tea consumption and risk of endometrial cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Arch Gynecol Obstet 2016; 293(1):143-155AG

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Several studies have assessed the association between green and black tea consumption and the risk of endometrial cancer (EC) and have yielded inconsistent results.

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this meta-analysis is to systematically analyze the effect of green tea and black tea on EC risk.

METHODS

PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library and China Biological Medicine Database were searched through February 2, 2015 to identify studies that met pre-stated inclusion criteria. Overall relative risk (RR) was estimated based on the highest and lowest levels of green/black tea consumption. Dose-response relationships were evaluated with the data from categories of green/black tea intake in each study.

RESULTS

For green tea, the summary RR indicated that the highest green tea consumption was associated with a reduced risk of EC (RR 0.78, 95 % CI 0.66-0.92). Furthermore, an increase in green tea consumption of one cup per day was associated with an 11 % decreased risk of developing EC. (RR 0.89, 95 % CI 0.84-0.94). For black tea, no statistically significant association was observed in the meta-analysis (highest versus non/lowest, RR 0.99, 95 % CI 0.79-1.23; increment of one cup/day, RR 0.99, 95 % CI 0.94-1.03). The power of the estimate of green tea and black tea with risk of EC was 84.33 and 5.07 %, respectively. The quality of evidence for the association between green and black tea with EC risk was moderate and very low, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

The results from this meta-analysis indicate that green tea, but not black tea, may be related to a reduction of EC risk. Large population-based randomized controlled trials and large prospective cohort studies are required to obtain a definitive conclusion and determine the mechanisms underlying this association.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Science and Education, First People's Hospital of Changde City, No. 818, Renming road, Changde, 415003, Hunan, China.Department of Oncology, First People's Hospital of Changde City, No. 818, Renming road, Changde, 415003, Hunan, China.Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical University, Zunyi Medical University, No. 149, Dalian road, Zunyi, 563000, Guizhou, China.Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, No. 79, Chongshan road, Shenyang, 110032, Liaoning, China.Department of Oncology, First People's Hospital of Changde City, No. 818, Renming road, Changde, 415003, Hunan, China. cdyymike@163.com.Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical University, Zunyi Medical University, No. 149, Dalian road, Zunyi, 563000, Guizhou, China. mahuab@163.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26138307

Citation

Zhou, Quan, et al. "Green Tea, Black Tea Consumption and Risk of Endometrial Cancer: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis." Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, vol. 293, no. 1, 2016, pp. 143-155.
Zhou Q, Li H, Zhou JG, et al. Green tea, black tea consumption and risk of endometrial cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2016;293(1):143-155.
Zhou, Q., Li, H., Zhou, J. G., Ma, Y., Wu, T., & Ma, H. (2016). Green tea, black tea consumption and risk of endometrial cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 293(1), pp. 143-155. doi:10.1007/s00404-015-3811-1.
Zhou Q, et al. Green Tea, Black Tea Consumption and Risk of Endometrial Cancer: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2016;293(1):143-155. PubMed PMID: 26138307.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Green tea, black tea consumption and risk of endometrial cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis. AU - Zhou,Quan, AU - Li,Hui, AU - Zhou,Jian-Guo, AU - Ma,Yuan, AU - Wu,Tao, AU - Ma,Hu, Y1 - 2015/07/03/ PY - 2015/04/20/received PY - 2015/06/26/accepted PY - 2015/7/4/entrez PY - 2015/7/4/pubmed PY - 2016/7/16/medline KW - Black tea KW - Dose–response relationship KW - Endometrial cancer KW - Green tea KW - Meta-analysis KW - Systematic review SP - 143 EP - 155 JF - Archives of gynecology and obstetrics JO - Arch. Gynecol. Obstet. VL - 293 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Several studies have assessed the association between green and black tea consumption and the risk of endometrial cancer (EC) and have yielded inconsistent results. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this meta-analysis is to systematically analyze the effect of green tea and black tea on EC risk. METHODS: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library and China Biological Medicine Database were searched through February 2, 2015 to identify studies that met pre-stated inclusion criteria. Overall relative risk (RR) was estimated based on the highest and lowest levels of green/black tea consumption. Dose-response relationships were evaluated with the data from categories of green/black tea intake in each study. RESULTS: For green tea, the summary RR indicated that the highest green tea consumption was associated with a reduced risk of EC (RR 0.78, 95 % CI 0.66-0.92). Furthermore, an increase in green tea consumption of one cup per day was associated with an 11 % decreased risk of developing EC. (RR 0.89, 95 % CI 0.84-0.94). For black tea, no statistically significant association was observed in the meta-analysis (highest versus non/lowest, RR 0.99, 95 % CI 0.79-1.23; increment of one cup/day, RR 0.99, 95 % CI 0.94-1.03). The power of the estimate of green tea and black tea with risk of EC was 84.33 and 5.07 %, respectively. The quality of evidence for the association between green and black tea with EC risk was moderate and very low, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The results from this meta-analysis indicate that green tea, but not black tea, may be related to a reduction of EC risk. Large population-based randomized controlled trials and large prospective cohort studies are required to obtain a definitive conclusion and determine the mechanisms underlying this association. SN - 1432-0711 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26138307/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00404-015-3811-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -