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Functional network centrality in obesity: A resting-state and task fMRI study.
Psychiatry Res 2015; 233(3):331-8PR

Abstract

Obesity is associated with structural and functional alterations in brain areas that are often functionally distinct and anatomically distant. This suggests that obesity is associated with differences in functional connectivity of regions distributed across the brain. However, studies addressing whole brain functional connectivity in obesity remain scarce. Here, we compared voxel-wise degree centrality and eigenvector centrality between participants with obesity (n=20) and normal-weight controls (n=21). We analyzed resting state and task-related fMRI data acquired from the same individuals. Relative to normal-weight controls, participants with obesity exhibited reduced degree centrality in the right middle frontal gyrus in the resting-state condition. During the task fMRI condition, obese participants exhibited less degree centrality in the left middle frontal gyrus and the lateral occipital cortex along with reduced eigenvector centrality in the lateral occipital cortex and occipital pole. Our results highlight the central role of the middle frontal gyrus in the pathophysiology of obesity, a structure involved in several brain circuits signaling attention, executive functions and motor functions. Additionally, our analysis suggests the existence of task-dependent reduced centrality in occipital areas; regions with a role in perceptual processes and that are profoundly modulated by attention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychobiology, University of Barcelona, Passeig de la Vall d'Hebron, 171, 08035 Barcelona, Spain; Department of Neurology, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany.Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychobiology, University of Barcelona, Passeig de la Vall d'Hebron, 171, 08035 Barcelona, Spain; Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (IR3C), University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Grup de Recerca Consolidat en Neuropsicologia (2014 SGR 98), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: majurado@ub.edu.Grup de Recerca Consolidat en Neuropsicologia (2014 SGR 98), Barcelona, Spain; Neuropsychology Unit, Hospital de Terrassa, Consorci Sanitari de Terrassa, Terrassa, Spain.Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychobiology, University of Barcelona, Passeig de la Vall d'Hebron, 171, 08035 Barcelona, Spain; Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (IR3C), University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.Department of Neurology, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany; IFB Adiposity Diseases, Leipzig University Medical Center, Leipzig, Germany.Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychobiology, University of Barcelona, Passeig de la Vall d'Hebron, 171, 08035 Barcelona, Spain; Grup de Recerca Consolidat en Neuropsicologia (2014 SGR 98), Barcelona, Spain.Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychobiology, University of Barcelona, Passeig de la Vall d'Hebron, 171, 08035 Barcelona, Spain; Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (IR3C), University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Grup de Recerca Consolidat en Neuropsicologia (2014 SGR 98), Barcelona, Spain.CAP Terrassa Nord, Consorci Sanitari de Terrassa, Terrassa, Spain.CAP Terrassa Nord, Consorci Sanitari de Terrassa, Terrassa, Spain.Department of Neurology, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany.Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychobiology, University of Barcelona, Passeig de la Vall d'Hebron, 171, 08035 Barcelona, Spain; Grup de Recerca Consolidat en Neuropsicologia (2014 SGR 98), Barcelona, Spain; Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spain.Max Planck Research Group for Neuroanatomy and Connectivity, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany.Department of Neurology, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany; IFB Adiposity Diseases, Leipzig University Medical Center, Leipzig, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26145769

Citation

García-García, Isabel, et al. "Functional Network Centrality in Obesity: a Resting-state and Task fMRI Study." Psychiatry Research, vol. 233, no. 3, 2015, pp. 331-8.
García-García I, Jurado MÁ, Garolera M, et al. Functional network centrality in obesity: A resting-state and task fMRI study. Psychiatry Res. 2015;233(3):331-8.
García-García, I., Jurado, M. Á., Garolera, M., Marqués-Iturria, I., Horstmann, A., Segura, B., ... Neumann, J. (2015). Functional network centrality in obesity: A resting-state and task fMRI study. Psychiatry Research, 233(3), pp. 331-8. doi:10.1016/j.pscychresns.2015.05.017.
García-García I, et al. Functional Network Centrality in Obesity: a Resting-state and Task fMRI Study. Psychiatry Res. 2015 Sep 30;233(3):331-8. PubMed PMID: 26145769.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Functional network centrality in obesity: A resting-state and task fMRI study. AU - García-García,Isabel, AU - Jurado,María Ángeles, AU - Garolera,Maite, AU - Marqués-Iturria,Idoia, AU - Horstmann,Annette, AU - Segura,Bàrbara, AU - Pueyo,Roser, AU - Sender-Palacios,María José, AU - Vernet-Vernet,Maria, AU - Villringer,Arno, AU - Junqué,Carme, AU - Margulies,Daniel S, AU - Neumann,Jane, Y1 - 2015/06/19/ PY - 2014/08/01/received PY - 2015/02/03/revised PY - 2015/05/28/accepted PY - 2015/7/7/entrez PY - 2015/7/7/pubmed PY - 2016/4/9/medline KW - Body-mass index KW - Brain KW - Functional connectivity KW - Graph analysis KW - fMRI SP - 331 EP - 8 JF - Psychiatry research JO - Psychiatry Res VL - 233 IS - 3 N2 - Obesity is associated with structural and functional alterations in brain areas that are often functionally distinct and anatomically distant. This suggests that obesity is associated with differences in functional connectivity of regions distributed across the brain. However, studies addressing whole brain functional connectivity in obesity remain scarce. Here, we compared voxel-wise degree centrality and eigenvector centrality between participants with obesity (n=20) and normal-weight controls (n=21). We analyzed resting state and task-related fMRI data acquired from the same individuals. Relative to normal-weight controls, participants with obesity exhibited reduced degree centrality in the right middle frontal gyrus in the resting-state condition. During the task fMRI condition, obese participants exhibited less degree centrality in the left middle frontal gyrus and the lateral occipital cortex along with reduced eigenvector centrality in the lateral occipital cortex and occipital pole. Our results highlight the central role of the middle frontal gyrus in the pathophysiology of obesity, a structure involved in several brain circuits signaling attention, executive functions and motor functions. Additionally, our analysis suggests the existence of task-dependent reduced centrality in occipital areas; regions with a role in perceptual processes and that are profoundly modulated by attention. SN - 1872-7123 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26145769/Functional_network_centrality_in_obesity:_A_resting_state_and_task_fMRI_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0925-4927(15)30006-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -