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Fermented dairy food and CVD risk.
Br J Nutr 2015; 113 Suppl 2:S131-5BJ

Abstract

Fermented dairy foods such as yoghurt and cheese are commonly found in the Mediterranean diet. Recent landmark research has confirmed the effect of the Mediterranean diet on reducing the CVD risk, but the relative contributions of fermented dairy foods have not been fully articulated. The present study provides a review of the relationship between fermented dairy foods consumption and CVD risk in the context of the whole diet. Studies show that people who eat healthier diets may be more likely to consume yoghurt, so there is a challenge in attributing separate effects to yoghurt. Analyses from large population studies list yoghurt as the food most negatively associated with the risk of weight gain (a problem that may lead to CVD). There is some suggestion that fermented dairy foods consumption (yoghurt or cheese) may be associated with reduced inflammatory biomarkers associated with the development of CVD. Dietary trials suggest that cheese may not have the same effect on raising LDL-cholesterol levels as butter with the same saturated fat content. The same might be stated for yoghurt. The use of different probiotic cultures and other aspects of study design remain a problem for research. Nevertheless, population studies from a range of countries have shown that a reduced risk of CVD occurs with the consumption of fermented dairy foods. A combination of evidence is necessary, and more research is always valuable, but indications remain that fermented dairy foods such as cheese and yoghurt are integral to diets that are protective against CVD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Medicine, Smart Foods Centre, Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong,Wollongong,NSW2522,Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26148916

Citation

Tapsell, Linda C.. "Fermented Dairy Food and CVD Risk." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 113 Suppl 2, 2015, pp. S131-5.
Tapsell LC. Fermented dairy food and CVD risk. Br J Nutr. 2015;113 Suppl 2:S131-5.
Tapsell, L. C. (2015). Fermented dairy food and CVD risk. The British Journal of Nutrition, 113 Suppl 2, pp. S131-5. doi:10.1017/S0007114514002359.
Tapsell LC. Fermented Dairy Food and CVD Risk. Br J Nutr. 2015;113 Suppl 2:S131-5. PubMed PMID: 26148916.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fermented dairy food and CVD risk. A1 - Tapsell,Linda C, PY - 2015/7/8/entrez PY - 2015/7/8/pubmed PY - 2015/9/19/medline KW - CVD KW - Dairy foods KW - Nutrition SP - S131 EP - 5 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 113 Suppl 2 N2 - Fermented dairy foods such as yoghurt and cheese are commonly found in the Mediterranean diet. Recent landmark research has confirmed the effect of the Mediterranean diet on reducing the CVD risk, but the relative contributions of fermented dairy foods have not been fully articulated. The present study provides a review of the relationship between fermented dairy foods consumption and CVD risk in the context of the whole diet. Studies show that people who eat healthier diets may be more likely to consume yoghurt, so there is a challenge in attributing separate effects to yoghurt. Analyses from large population studies list yoghurt as the food most negatively associated with the risk of weight gain (a problem that may lead to CVD). There is some suggestion that fermented dairy foods consumption (yoghurt or cheese) may be associated with reduced inflammatory biomarkers associated with the development of CVD. Dietary trials suggest that cheese may not have the same effect on raising LDL-cholesterol levels as butter with the same saturated fat content. The same might be stated for yoghurt. The use of different probiotic cultures and other aspects of study design remain a problem for research. Nevertheless, population studies from a range of countries have shown that a reduced risk of CVD occurs with the consumption of fermented dairy foods. A combination of evidence is necessary, and more research is always valuable, but indications remain that fermented dairy foods such as cheese and yoghurt are integral to diets that are protective against CVD. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26148916/Fermented_dairy_food_and_CVD_risk_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114514002359/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -