Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

European Adder bites in dogs in southern Germany. A retrospective study over a 6.5-year period.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

In some regions of Germany dogs are presented to the veterinarian due to a snake bite, especially during the summer. These patients often show multiple clinical and laboratory deviations. Without a significant history diagnosis is commonly difficult. Aim of this retrospective study was to analyze exposure, physical examination and clinical pathology results as well as course and outcome in dogs presented after European adder bites.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Patient history of 15 dogs diagnosed with European adder bites over a 6.5-year-period were evaluated retrospectively. Normality of data distribution was tested by D'Agostino and Pearson omnibus normality test. Data were analyzed by T-test and Wilcoxon-matched-pairs-signed rank-test. P-values < 0.05 were considered significant.

RESULTS

All 15 dogs were presented within 1-48 hours after the snakebite. Most common clinical signs were local swelling and pain. Clinical pathology results on day 1 included haemoconcentration, leukocytosis and coagulopathy. On the second day of hospitalization heart rate and haematocrit declined significantly. Treatment included fluid therapy, antibiotic and antihistaminic drugs, glucocorticosteroids, antivenom and analgesics. One of 15 dogs died on the third day of hospitalization, all others were discharged. Duration of hospitalization was between 1 and 8 days (mean 4.2 ± 1.9 days).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Dogs affected by European adder bites most often present with swelling and pain at the site of the bite, most frequently on the head and limbs. Patients require intensive symptomatic therapy including antibiotics and analgesics, if indicated. With adequate therapy survival rate is high. For some patients European adder bites may be lethal.

Authors+Show Affiliations

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableDr. René Dörfelt, Medizinische Kleintierklinik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Veterinärstraβe 13, 80539 München, E-Mail: r.doerfelt@medizinische-kleintierklinik.de.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng ger

PubMed ID

26152480

Citation

Turković, V, et al. "European Adder Bites in Dogs in Southern Germany. a Retrospective Study Over a 6.5-year Period." Tierarztliche Praxis. Ausgabe K, Kleintiere/Heimtiere, vol. 43, no. 4, 2015, pp. 221-30.
Turković V, Teichmann S, Dörfelt R. European Adder bites in dogs in southern Germany. A retrospective study over a 6.5-year period. Tierarztl Prax Ausg K Kleintiere Heimtiere. 2015;43(4):221-30.
Turković, V., Teichmann, S., & Dörfelt, R. (2015). European Adder bites in dogs in southern Germany. A retrospective study over a 6.5-year period. Tierarztliche Praxis. Ausgabe K, Kleintiere/Heimtiere, 43(4), 221-30. https://doi.org/10.15654/TPK-140364
Turković V, Teichmann S, Dörfelt R. European Adder Bites in Dogs in Southern Germany. a Retrospective Study Over a 6.5-year Period. Tierarztl Prax Ausg K Kleintiere Heimtiere. 2015;43(4):221-30. PubMed PMID: 26152480.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - European Adder bites in dogs in southern Germany. A retrospective study over a 6.5-year period. AU - Turković,V, AU - Teichmann,S, AU - Dörfelt,R, Y1 - 2015/07/08/ PY - 2014/04/27/received PY - 2015/03/04/accepted PY - 2015/7/9/entrez PY - 2015/7/15/pubmed PY - 2016/3/12/medline KW - Snakebite KW - antivenom KW - coagulopathy KW - haemoconcentration KW - prognosis SP - 221 EP - 30 JF - Tierarztliche Praxis. Ausgabe K, Kleintiere/Heimtiere JO - Tierarztl Prax Ausg K Kleintiere Heimtiere VL - 43 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: In some regions of Germany dogs are presented to the veterinarian due to a snake bite, especially during the summer. These patients often show multiple clinical and laboratory deviations. Without a significant history diagnosis is commonly difficult. Aim of this retrospective study was to analyze exposure, physical examination and clinical pathology results as well as course and outcome in dogs presented after European adder bites. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patient history of 15 dogs diagnosed with European adder bites over a 6.5-year-period were evaluated retrospectively. Normality of data distribution was tested by D'Agostino and Pearson omnibus normality test. Data were analyzed by T-test and Wilcoxon-matched-pairs-signed rank-test. P-values < 0.05 were considered significant. RESULTS: All 15 dogs were presented within 1-48 hours after the snakebite. Most common clinical signs were local swelling and pain. Clinical pathology results on day 1 included haemoconcentration, leukocytosis and coagulopathy. On the second day of hospitalization heart rate and haematocrit declined significantly. Treatment included fluid therapy, antibiotic and antihistaminic drugs, glucocorticosteroids, antivenom and analgesics. One of 15 dogs died on the third day of hospitalization, all others were discharged. Duration of hospitalization was between 1 and 8 days (mean 4.2 ± 1.9 days). CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Dogs affected by European adder bites most often present with swelling and pain at the site of the bite, most frequently on the head and limbs. Patients require intensive symptomatic therapy including antibiotics and analgesics, if indicated. With adequate therapy survival rate is high. For some patients European adder bites may be lethal. SN - 2567-5842 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26152480/European_Adder_bites_in_dogs_in_southern_Germany__A_retrospective_study_over_a_6_5_year_period_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -