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Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Patient Care: Medical Students' Preparedness and Comfort.
Teach Learn Med. 2015; 27(3):254-63.TL

Abstract

Phenomenon: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals face significant barriers in accessing appropriate and comprehensive medical care. Medical students' level of preparedness and comfort caring for LGBT patients is unknown.

APPROACH

An online questionnaire (2009-2010) was distributed to students (n = 9,522) at 176 allopathic and osteopathic medical schools in Canada and the United States, followed by focus groups (2010) with students (n = 35) at five medical schools. The objective of this study was to characterize LGBT-related medical curricula, to determine medical students' assessments of their institutions' LGBT-related curricular content, and to evaluate their comfort and preparedness in caring for LGBT patients.

FINDINGS

Of 9,522 survey respondents, 4,262 from 170 schools were included in the final analysis. Most medical students (2,866/4,262; 67.3%) evaluated their LGBT-related curriculum as "fair" or worse. Students most often felt prepared addressing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; 3,254/4,147; 78.5%) and non-HIV sexually transmitted infections (2,851/4,136; 68.9%). They felt least prepared discussing sex reassignment surgery (1,061/4,070; 26.1%) and gender transitioning (1,141/4,068; 28.0%). Medical education helped 62.6% (2,669/4,262) of students feel "more prepared" and 46.3% (1,972/4,262) of students feel "more comfortable" to care for LGBT patients. Four focus group sessions with 29 students were transcribed and analyzed. Qualitative analysis suggested students have significant concerns in addressing certain aspects of LGBT health, specifically with transgender patients. Insights: Medical students thought LGBT-specific curricula could be improved, consistent with the findings from a survey of deans of medical education. They felt comfortable, but not fully prepared, to care for LGBT patients. Increasing curricular coverage of LGBT-related topics is indicated with emphasis on exposing students to LGBT patients in clinical settings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, & Transgender Medical Education Research Group, Stanford University School of Medicine , Stanford , California , USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26158327

Citation

White, William, et al. "Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Patient Care: Medical Students' Preparedness and Comfort." Teaching and Learning in Medicine, vol. 27, no. 3, 2015, pp. 254-63.
White W, Brenman S, Paradis E, et al. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Patient Care: Medical Students' Preparedness and Comfort. Teach Learn Med. 2015;27(3):254-63.
White, W., Brenman, S., Paradis, E., Goldsmith, E. S., Lunn, M. R., Obedin-Maliver, J., Stewart, L., Tran, E., Wells, M., Chamberlain, L. J., Fetterman, D. M., & Garcia, G. (2015). Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Patient Care: Medical Students' Preparedness and Comfort. Teaching and Learning in Medicine, 27(3), 254-63. https://doi.org/10.1080/10401334.2015.1044656
White W, et al. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Patient Care: Medical Students' Preparedness and Comfort. Teach Learn Med. 2015;27(3):254-63. PubMed PMID: 26158327.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Patient Care: Medical Students' Preparedness and Comfort. AU - White,William, AU - Brenman,Stephanie, AU - Paradis,Elise, AU - Goldsmith,Elizabeth S, AU - Lunn,Mitchell R, AU - Obedin-Maliver,Juno, AU - Stewart,Leslie, AU - Tran,Eric, AU - Wells,Maggie, AU - Chamberlain,Lisa J, AU - Fetterman,David M, AU - Garcia,Gabriel, PY - 2015/7/10/entrez PY - 2015/7/15/pubmed PY - 2016/5/4/medline KW - and comfort KW - bisexual KW - gay KW - lesbian KW - patient care KW - transgender health SP - 254 EP - 63 JF - Teaching and learning in medicine JO - Teach Learn Med VL - 27 IS - 3 N2 - UNLABELLED: Phenomenon: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals face significant barriers in accessing appropriate and comprehensive medical care. Medical students' level of preparedness and comfort caring for LGBT patients is unknown. APPROACH: An online questionnaire (2009-2010) was distributed to students (n = 9,522) at 176 allopathic and osteopathic medical schools in Canada and the United States, followed by focus groups (2010) with students (n = 35) at five medical schools. The objective of this study was to characterize LGBT-related medical curricula, to determine medical students' assessments of their institutions' LGBT-related curricular content, and to evaluate their comfort and preparedness in caring for LGBT patients. FINDINGS: Of 9,522 survey respondents, 4,262 from 170 schools were included in the final analysis. Most medical students (2,866/4,262; 67.3%) evaluated their LGBT-related curriculum as "fair" or worse. Students most often felt prepared addressing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; 3,254/4,147; 78.5%) and non-HIV sexually transmitted infections (2,851/4,136; 68.9%). They felt least prepared discussing sex reassignment surgery (1,061/4,070; 26.1%) and gender transitioning (1,141/4,068; 28.0%). Medical education helped 62.6% (2,669/4,262) of students feel "more prepared" and 46.3% (1,972/4,262) of students feel "more comfortable" to care for LGBT patients. Four focus group sessions with 29 students were transcribed and analyzed. Qualitative analysis suggested students have significant concerns in addressing certain aspects of LGBT health, specifically with transgender patients. Insights: Medical students thought LGBT-specific curricula could be improved, consistent with the findings from a survey of deans of medical education. They felt comfortable, but not fully prepared, to care for LGBT patients. Increasing curricular coverage of LGBT-related topics is indicated with emphasis on exposing students to LGBT patients in clinical settings. SN - 1532-8015 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26158327/Lesbian_Gay_Bisexual_and_Transgender_Patient_Care:_Medical_Students'_Preparedness_and_Comfort_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10401334.2015.1044656 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -