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Dietary adherence and acceptability of five different diets, including vegan and vegetarian diets, for weight loss: The New DIETs study.
Eat Behav. 2015 Dec; 19:33-8.EB

Abstract

The goal of the present study was to examine dietary adherence and acceptability among participants from the New DIETs study who were randomized to one of four plant-based diets (vegan, vegetarian, pesco-vegetarian, semi-vegetarian) or an omnivore diet. Primary outcomes at two- and six months included dietary adherence (24-hour dietary recalls), weight loss and changes in animal product intake (mg cholesterol) by adherence status, Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ), Power of Food Scale (PFS), dietary acceptability (Food Acceptability Questionnaire), and impact of diet preference on adherence. No differences were found in dietary adherence or changes in FAQ, TFEQ, or PFS among the groups. At six months, non-adherent vegan and vegetarian participants (n=16) had a significantly greater decrease in cholesterol intake (-190.2 ± 199.2 mg) than non-adherent pesco-vegetarian/semi-vegetarian (n=15, -2.3 ± 200.3 mg, P=0.02) or omnivore participants (n=7, 17.0 ± 36.0, P=0.04). Non-adherent vegan/vegetarian participants lost significantly more weight at six months (-6.0 ± 6.7%) than non-adherent omnivore participants (-0.4 ± 0.6%, P=0.04). Dietary preference had no impact on adherence at six months. Due to equal rates of adherence and acceptability among the diet groups, instructing participants to follow vegan or vegetarian diets may have a greater impact on weight loss and animal product intake than providing instruction in more moderate approaches even among non-adherent participants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of South Carolina, Arnold School of Public Health, Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, Discovery I, 915 Greene Street, Room 535, Columbia, SC 29208, United States. Electronic address: wmoore@email.sc.edu.University of Akron, Department of Statistics, 302 East Buchtel Avenue, Akron, OH 44325, United States. Electronic address: mcgrievy@gmail.com.University of South Carolina, Arnold School of Public Health, Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, Discovery I, 915 Greene Street, Room 529, Columbia, SC 29208, United States. Electronic address: brie@sc.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26164391

Citation

Moore, Wendy J., et al. "Dietary Adherence and Acceptability of Five Different Diets, Including Vegan and Vegetarian Diets, for Weight Loss: the New DIETs Study." Eating Behaviors, vol. 19, 2015, pp. 33-8.
Moore WJ, McGrievy ME, Turner-McGrievy GM. Dietary adherence and acceptability of five different diets, including vegan and vegetarian diets, for weight loss: The New DIETs study. Eat Behav. 2015;19:33-8.
Moore, W. J., McGrievy, M. E., & Turner-McGrievy, G. M. (2015). Dietary adherence and acceptability of five different diets, including vegan and vegetarian diets, for weight loss: The New DIETs study. Eating Behaviors, 19, 33-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eatbeh.2015.06.011
Moore WJ, McGrievy ME, Turner-McGrievy GM. Dietary Adherence and Acceptability of Five Different Diets, Including Vegan and Vegetarian Diets, for Weight Loss: the New DIETs Study. Eat Behav. 2015;19:33-8. PubMed PMID: 26164391.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary adherence and acceptability of five different diets, including vegan and vegetarian diets, for weight loss: The New DIETs study. AU - Moore,Wendy J, AU - McGrievy,Michael E, AU - Turner-McGrievy,Gabrielle M, Y1 - 2015/07/02/ PY - 2015/03/06/received PY - 2015/05/12/revised PY - 2015/06/24/accepted PY - 2015/7/13/entrez PY - 2015/7/15/pubmed PY - 2016/3/16/medline KW - Acceptability KW - Adherence KW - Diets KW - Vegan KW - Vegetarian KW - Weight loss SP - 33 EP - 8 JF - Eating behaviors JO - Eat Behav VL - 19 N2 - The goal of the present study was to examine dietary adherence and acceptability among participants from the New DIETs study who were randomized to one of four plant-based diets (vegan, vegetarian, pesco-vegetarian, semi-vegetarian) or an omnivore diet. Primary outcomes at two- and six months included dietary adherence (24-hour dietary recalls), weight loss and changes in animal product intake (mg cholesterol) by adherence status, Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ), Power of Food Scale (PFS), dietary acceptability (Food Acceptability Questionnaire), and impact of diet preference on adherence. No differences were found in dietary adherence or changes in FAQ, TFEQ, or PFS among the groups. At six months, non-adherent vegan and vegetarian participants (n=16) had a significantly greater decrease in cholesterol intake (-190.2 ± 199.2 mg) than non-adherent pesco-vegetarian/semi-vegetarian (n=15, -2.3 ± 200.3 mg, P=0.02) or omnivore participants (n=7, 17.0 ± 36.0, P=0.04). Non-adherent vegan/vegetarian participants lost significantly more weight at six months (-6.0 ± 6.7%) than non-adherent omnivore participants (-0.4 ± 0.6%, P=0.04). Dietary preference had no impact on adherence at six months. Due to equal rates of adherence and acceptability among the diet groups, instructing participants to follow vegan or vegetarian diets may have a greater impact on weight loss and animal product intake than providing instruction in more moderate approaches even among non-adherent participants. SN - 1873-7358 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26164391/Dietary_adherence_and_acceptability_of_five_different_diets_including_vegan_and_vegetarian_diets_for_weight_loss:_The_New_DIETs_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1471-0153(15)00080-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -