Prime

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Recognizing Success in the Chaplain Profession: Connecting Perceptions With Practice.

Abstract

The current investigation examines the communicative hallmarks of successful chaplaincy work as articulated by professional chaplains providing spiritual care at the end-of-life. Data grounded in qualitative interviews with 32 chaplains of various denominations and lengths of service reveals a challenge in gauging success when working with dying patients and families. Chaplains reported nonverbal hallmarks of success consist of (a) intrapersonal sense of accomplishment, (b) progress in fulfilling patient needs, and (c) meaningful connection with patients. Verbal hallmarks of success include (a) patient affirmation, (b) family affirmation, and the (c) chaplain being asked to participate in religious rites. In practice, the authors conjecture, chaplains assess professional competency in the self, patient, and family domains. Implications and future directions are discussed.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    a Department of Communication , North Central College , Naperville , Illinois , USA.

    ,

    b Department of Communication , SUNY Buffalo , Buffalo , New York , USA.

    c Department of Communication , University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee , Milwaukee , Wisconsin , USA.

    Source

    MeSH

    Achievement
    Adult
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Attitude of Health Personnel
    Chaplaincy Service, Hospital
    Clergy
    Communication
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Pastoral Care
    Professional-Patient Relations
    Qualitative Research
    Terminal Care
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26167625