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Caffeine Intake, Coffee Consumption, and Risk of Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma.
Epidemiology 2015; 26(6):898-908E

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Caffeine has been shown to prevent ultraviolet radiation-induced carcinogenesis and to inhibit growth of melanoma cells in experimental studies. We evaluated the association among caffeine intake, coffee consumption, and melanoma risk among three large cohort studies.

METHODS

The analysis used data from 89,220 women in the Nurses' Health Study II (1991-2009), 74,666 women in the Nurses' Health Study (1980-2008), and 39,424 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986-2008). We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of melanoma associated with dietary intakes.

RESULTS

We documented 2,254 melanoma cases over 4 million person-years of follow-up. After adjustment for other risk factors, higher total caffeine intake was associated with a lower risk of melanoma (≥393 mg/day vs. <60 mg/day: HR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.64, 0.96; Ptrend = 0.048). The association was more apparent in women (≥393 mg/day vs. <60 mg/day: HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.58, 0.85; Ptrend = 0.001) than in men (HR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.75, 1.2; Ptrend = 0.81), and more apparent for melanomas occurring on body sites with higher continuous sun exposure (head, neck, and extremities; ≥393 mg/day vs. <60 mg/day: HR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.59, 0.86; Ptrend = 0.001) than for melanomas occurring on body sites with lower continuous sun exposure (trunk including shoulder, back, hip, abdomen, and chest; HR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.70, 1.2; Ptrend = 0.60). This pattern of association was similar to that for caffeinated coffee consumption, whereas no association was found for decaffeinated coffee consumption and melanoma risk.

CONCLUSIONS

Increasing caffeine intake and caffeinated coffee consumption is associated with decreased risk of cutaneous malignant melanomas.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the aDepartment of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; bDepartment of Dermatology, Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI; cDepartment of Epidemiology, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN; dMelvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN; eDepartment of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN; fChanning Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; gDepartment of Epidemiology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; hDepartment of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; iDepartment of Nutritional Sciences, The College of Health and Human Development, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA; and jDepartment of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26172864

Citation

Wu, Shaowei, et al. "Caffeine Intake, Coffee Consumption, and Risk of Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma." Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), vol. 26, no. 6, 2015, pp. 898-908.
Wu S, Han J, Song F, et al. Caffeine Intake, Coffee Consumption, and Risk of Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma. Epidemiology. 2015;26(6):898-908.
Wu, S., Han, J., Song, F., Cho, E., Gao, X., Hunter, D. J., & Qureshi, A. A. (2015). Caffeine Intake, Coffee Consumption, and Risk of Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma. Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), 26(6), pp. 898-908. doi:10.1097/EDE.0000000000000360.
Wu S, et al. Caffeine Intake, Coffee Consumption, and Risk of Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma. Epidemiology. 2015;26(6):898-908. PubMed PMID: 26172864.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Caffeine Intake, Coffee Consumption, and Risk of Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma. AU - Wu,Shaowei, AU - Han,Jiali, AU - Song,Fengju, AU - Cho,Eunyoung, AU - Gao,Xiang, AU - Hunter,David J, AU - Qureshi,Abrar A, PY - 2015/7/15/entrez PY - 2015/7/15/pubmed PY - 2016/7/12/medline SP - 898 EP - 908 JF - Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) JO - Epidemiology VL - 26 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Caffeine has been shown to prevent ultraviolet radiation-induced carcinogenesis and to inhibit growth of melanoma cells in experimental studies. We evaluated the association among caffeine intake, coffee consumption, and melanoma risk among three large cohort studies. METHODS: The analysis used data from 89,220 women in the Nurses' Health Study II (1991-2009), 74,666 women in the Nurses' Health Study (1980-2008), and 39,424 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986-2008). We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of melanoma associated with dietary intakes. RESULTS: We documented 2,254 melanoma cases over 4 million person-years of follow-up. After adjustment for other risk factors, higher total caffeine intake was associated with a lower risk of melanoma (≥393 mg/day vs. <60 mg/day: HR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.64, 0.96; Ptrend = 0.048). The association was more apparent in women (≥393 mg/day vs. <60 mg/day: HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.58, 0.85; Ptrend = 0.001) than in men (HR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.75, 1.2; Ptrend = 0.81), and more apparent for melanomas occurring on body sites with higher continuous sun exposure (head, neck, and extremities; ≥393 mg/day vs. <60 mg/day: HR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.59, 0.86; Ptrend = 0.001) than for melanomas occurring on body sites with lower continuous sun exposure (trunk including shoulder, back, hip, abdomen, and chest; HR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.70, 1.2; Ptrend = 0.60). This pattern of association was similar to that for caffeinated coffee consumption, whereas no association was found for decaffeinated coffee consumption and melanoma risk. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing caffeine intake and caffeinated coffee consumption is associated with decreased risk of cutaneous malignant melanomas. SN - 1531-5487 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26172864/Caffeine_Intake_Coffee_Consumption_and_Risk_of_Cutaneous_Malignant_Melanoma_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=26172864 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -