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With peppermints you're not my prince: aroma modulates self-other integration.
Atten Percept Psychophys. 2015 Nov; 77(8):2817-25.AP

Abstract

Recent studies showed that self-other integration, as indexed by the joint Simon effect (JSE), can be modulated by biasing participants towards particular (integrative vs. exclusive) cognitive-control states. Interestingly, there is evidence suggesting that such control states can be induced by particular odors: stimulating odors (e.g., peppermint aroma) seem to induce a more focused, exclusive state; relaxing odors (e.g., lavender aroma) are thought to induce a broader, more integrative state. In the present study, we tested the possible impact of peppermint and lavender aromas on self-other integration. Pairs of participants performed the joint Simon task in an either peppermint- or lavender-scented testing room. Results showed that both aromas modulated the size of the JSE, although they had a dissociable effect on reaction times (RTs) and percentage of errors (PEs). Whilst the JSE in RTs was found to be less pronounced in the peppermint group, compared to the lavender and no-aroma groups, the JSE in PEs was significantly more pronounced in the lavender group, compared to the peppermint and no-aroma group. These results are consistent with the emerging literature suggesting that the degree of self-other integration does not reflect a trait but a particular cognitive state, which can be biased towards excluding or integrating the other in one's self-representation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Psychological Research and Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands. r.sellaro@fsw.leidenuniv.nl. Cognitive Psychology Unit, Leiden University, Wassenaarseweg 52, 2333 AK, Leiden, The Netherlands. r.sellaro@fsw.leidenuniv.nl.Institute for Psychological Research and Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands.Institute for Psychological Research and Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands.Institute for Psychological Research and Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26174477

Citation

Sellaro, Roberta, et al. "With Peppermints You're Not My Prince: Aroma Modulates Self-other Integration." Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, vol. 77, no. 8, 2015, pp. 2817-25.
Sellaro R, Hommel B, Rossi Paccani C, et al. With peppermints you're not my prince: aroma modulates self-other integration. Atten Percept Psychophys. 2015;77(8):2817-25.
Sellaro, R., Hommel, B., Rossi Paccani, C., & Colzato, L. S. (2015). With peppermints you're not my prince: aroma modulates self-other integration. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, 77(8), 2817-25. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13414-015-0955-9
Sellaro R, et al. With Peppermints You're Not My Prince: Aroma Modulates Self-other Integration. Atten Percept Psychophys. 2015;77(8):2817-25. PubMed PMID: 26174477.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - With peppermints you're not my prince: aroma modulates self-other integration. AU - Sellaro,Roberta, AU - Hommel,Bernhard, AU - Rossi Paccani,Claudia, AU - Colzato,Lorenza S, PY - 2015/7/16/entrez PY - 2015/7/16/pubmed PY - 2016/6/30/medline KW - Aromas KW - Attention KW - Cognitive state KW - Joint Simon effect KW - Self-other integration SP - 2817 EP - 25 JF - Attention, perception & psychophysics JO - Atten Percept Psychophys VL - 77 IS - 8 N2 - Recent studies showed that self-other integration, as indexed by the joint Simon effect (JSE), can be modulated by biasing participants towards particular (integrative vs. exclusive) cognitive-control states. Interestingly, there is evidence suggesting that such control states can be induced by particular odors: stimulating odors (e.g., peppermint aroma) seem to induce a more focused, exclusive state; relaxing odors (e.g., lavender aroma) are thought to induce a broader, more integrative state. In the present study, we tested the possible impact of peppermint and lavender aromas on self-other integration. Pairs of participants performed the joint Simon task in an either peppermint- or lavender-scented testing room. Results showed that both aromas modulated the size of the JSE, although they had a dissociable effect on reaction times (RTs) and percentage of errors (PEs). Whilst the JSE in RTs was found to be less pronounced in the peppermint group, compared to the lavender and no-aroma groups, the JSE in PEs was significantly more pronounced in the lavender group, compared to the peppermint and no-aroma group. These results are consistent with the emerging literature suggesting that the degree of self-other integration does not reflect a trait but a particular cognitive state, which can be biased towards excluding or integrating the other in one's self-representation. SN - 1943-393X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26174477/With_peppermints_you're_not_my_prince:_aroma_modulates_self_other_integration_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13414-015-0955-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -