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Association between Vitamin D and Circulating Lipids in Early Childhood.
PLoS One. 2015; 10(7):e0131938.Plos

Abstract

Vitamin D is associated with established cardiovascular risk factors such as low density lipoprotein (LDL) in adults. It is unknown whether these associations are present in early childhood. To determine whether serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) is associated with serum non-high density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol during early childhood we conducted a cross-sectional study of children aged 1 to 5 years. Healthy children were recruited through the TARGet Kids! practice based research network from 2008-2011 (n=1,961). The associations between 25(OH)D and non-fasting non-HDL cholesterol (the primary endpoint), total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, were evaluated using multiple linear regression adjusted for age, sex, skin pigmentation, milk intake, vitamin D supplementation, season, body mass index, outdoor play, and screen time. Each 10 nmol/L increase in 25(OH)D was associated with a decrease in non-HDL cholesterol concentration of -0.89 mg/dl (95% CI: -1.16,-0.50), total cholesterol of -1.08 mg/dl (95%CI: -1.49,-0.70), and triglycerides of -2.34 mg/dl (95%CI: -3.23,-1.45). The associations between 25(OH)D and LDL and HDL were not statistically significant. 25(OH)D concentrations were inversely associated with circulating lipids in early childhood, suggesting that vitamin D exposure in early life may be an early modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pediatric Outcomes Research Team (PORT), Division of Paediatric Medicine, Department of Paediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Institute for Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Institute for Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; The Applied Health Research Centre of the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Pediatric Outcomes Research Team (PORT), Division of Paediatric Medicine, Department of Paediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; The Applied Health Research Centre of the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Cardiology Division, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.The Applied Health Research Centre of the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.The Applied Health Research Centre of the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Pediatric Outcomes Research Team (PORT), Division of Paediatric Medicine, Department of Paediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Pediatric Outcomes Research Team (PORT), Division of Paediatric Medicine, Department of Paediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Institute for Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Pediatric Outcomes Research Team (PORT), Division of Paediatric Medicine, Department of Paediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Institute for Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; The Applied Health Research Centre of the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Pediatrics, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26176958

Citation

Birken, Catherine S., et al. "Association Between Vitamin D and Circulating Lipids in Early Childhood." PloS One, vol. 10, no. 7, 2015, pp. e0131938.
Birken CS, Lebovic G, Anderson LN, et al. Association between Vitamin D and Circulating Lipids in Early Childhood. PLoS One. 2015;10(7):e0131938.
Birken, C. S., Lebovic, G., Anderson, L. N., McCrindle, B. W., Mamdani, M., Kandasamy, S., Khovratovich, M., Parkin, P. C., & Maguire, J. L. (2015). Association between Vitamin D and Circulating Lipids in Early Childhood. PloS One, 10(7), e0131938. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0131938
Birken CS, et al. Association Between Vitamin D and Circulating Lipids in Early Childhood. PLoS One. 2015;10(7):e0131938. PubMed PMID: 26176958.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between Vitamin D and Circulating Lipids in Early Childhood. AU - Birken,Catherine S, AU - Lebovic,Gerald, AU - Anderson,Laura N, AU - McCrindle,Brian W, AU - Mamdani,Muhammad, AU - Kandasamy,Sharmilaa, AU - Khovratovich,Marina, AU - Parkin,Patricia C, AU - Maguire,Jonathon L, AU - ,, Y1 - 2015/07/15/ PY - 2015/01/26/received PY - 2015/06/08/accepted PY - 2015/7/16/entrez PY - 2015/7/16/pubmed PY - 2016/4/30/medline SP - e0131938 EP - e0131938 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 10 IS - 7 N2 - Vitamin D is associated with established cardiovascular risk factors such as low density lipoprotein (LDL) in adults. It is unknown whether these associations are present in early childhood. To determine whether serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) is associated with serum non-high density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol during early childhood we conducted a cross-sectional study of children aged 1 to 5 years. Healthy children were recruited through the TARGet Kids! practice based research network from 2008-2011 (n=1,961). The associations between 25(OH)D and non-fasting non-HDL cholesterol (the primary endpoint), total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, were evaluated using multiple linear regression adjusted for age, sex, skin pigmentation, milk intake, vitamin D supplementation, season, body mass index, outdoor play, and screen time. Each 10 nmol/L increase in 25(OH)D was associated with a decrease in non-HDL cholesterol concentration of -0.89 mg/dl (95% CI: -1.16,-0.50), total cholesterol of -1.08 mg/dl (95%CI: -1.49,-0.70), and triglycerides of -2.34 mg/dl (95%CI: -3.23,-1.45). The associations between 25(OH)D and LDL and HDL were not statistically significant. 25(OH)D concentrations were inversely associated with circulating lipids in early childhood, suggesting that vitamin D exposure in early life may be an early modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26176958/Association_between_Vitamin_D_and_Circulating_Lipids_in_Early_Childhood_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0131938 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -