Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Within-person comparison of eating behaviors, time of eating, and dietary intake on days with and without breakfast: NHANES 2005-2010.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Sep; 102(3):661-70.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Breakfast omission is known to be associated with lower 24-h energy intake. However, little is known about downstream eating behaviors subsequent to skipping breakfast in free-living individuals.

OBJECTIVE

We replicated the traditional crossover design of nutrition studies in a naturalistic setting to compare within-person differences in self-reported eating behaviors, energy intake, and other dietary characteristics of individuals on a day that included breakfast with a day that omitted breakfast.

DESIGN

We used cross-sectional dietary data for 2132 adult respondents who reported breakfast in only one of 2 dietary recalls in the NHANES 2005-2010. Dietary outcomes examined included meal- and snack-eating behaviors, clock time of eating episodes, and intakes of energy, macronutrients, and food groups. Regression methods accounted for replicate diet measurements, covariates, and survey-design characteristics.

RESULTS

The breakfast meal provided a mean of 508 kcal in men and 374 kcal in women, but differences in 24-h energy intakes between the breakfast and no-breakfast day were 247 and 187 kcal, respectively. Energy intakes at the lunch meal were higher on the no-breakfast day (202 kcal in men and 121 kcal in women), and the reported time of lunch was ∼35 min earlier. The energy contribution of dinner or its reported time did not differ. A higher number of energy-adjusted servings of fruit and whole grains were reported on the breakfast day, but the energy and macronutrient density of reported foods were not different.

CONCLUSIONS

In free-living American adults, the eating time for lunch was earlier, and the lunch meal provided more energy on the no-breakfast day than on the breakfast day. Although the quality of dietary selections reflected in the energy and macronutrient density of a day's intake did not differ between the breakfast and the no-breakfast day, breakfast skippers may need encouragement to consume fruit and whole grains at other eating episodes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family, Nutrition, and Exercise Sciences, Queens College of the City University of New York, Flushing, NY; and ashima.kant@qc.cuny.edu.Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Biostatistics Branch, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26178722

Citation

Kant, Ashima K., and Barry I. Graubard. "Within-person Comparison of Eating Behaviors, Time of Eating, and Dietary Intake On Days With and Without Breakfast: NHANES 2005-2010." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 102, no. 3, 2015, pp. 661-70.
Kant AK, Graubard BI. Within-person comparison of eating behaviors, time of eating, and dietary intake on days with and without breakfast: NHANES 2005-2010. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;102(3):661-70.
Kant, A. K., & Graubard, B. I. (2015). Within-person comparison of eating behaviors, time of eating, and dietary intake on days with and without breakfast: NHANES 2005-2010. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 102(3), 661-70. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.115.110262
Kant AK, Graubard BI. Within-person Comparison of Eating Behaviors, Time of Eating, and Dietary Intake On Days With and Without Breakfast: NHANES 2005-2010. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;102(3):661-70. PubMed PMID: 26178722.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Within-person comparison of eating behaviors, time of eating, and dietary intake on days with and without breakfast: NHANES 2005-2010. AU - Kant,Ashima K, AU - Graubard,Barry I, Y1 - 2015/07/15/ PY - 2015/02/27/received PY - 2015/06/19/accepted PY - 2015/7/17/entrez PY - 2015/7/17/pubmed PY - 2015/12/15/medline KW - NHANES KW - breakfast KW - chrononutrition KW - eating behaviors KW - eating frequency KW - energy density KW - food pattern equivalents KW - main meals KW - obesity KW - time of eating SP - 661 EP - 70 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 102 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Breakfast omission is known to be associated with lower 24-h energy intake. However, little is known about downstream eating behaviors subsequent to skipping breakfast in free-living individuals. OBJECTIVE: We replicated the traditional crossover design of nutrition studies in a naturalistic setting to compare within-person differences in self-reported eating behaviors, energy intake, and other dietary characteristics of individuals on a day that included breakfast with a day that omitted breakfast. DESIGN: We used cross-sectional dietary data for 2132 adult respondents who reported breakfast in only one of 2 dietary recalls in the NHANES 2005-2010. Dietary outcomes examined included meal- and snack-eating behaviors, clock time of eating episodes, and intakes of energy, macronutrients, and food groups. Regression methods accounted for replicate diet measurements, covariates, and survey-design characteristics. RESULTS: The breakfast meal provided a mean of 508 kcal in men and 374 kcal in women, but differences in 24-h energy intakes between the breakfast and no-breakfast day were 247 and 187 kcal, respectively. Energy intakes at the lunch meal were higher on the no-breakfast day (202 kcal in men and 121 kcal in women), and the reported time of lunch was ∼35 min earlier. The energy contribution of dinner or its reported time did not differ. A higher number of energy-adjusted servings of fruit and whole grains were reported on the breakfast day, but the energy and macronutrient density of reported foods were not different. CONCLUSIONS: In free-living American adults, the eating time for lunch was earlier, and the lunch meal provided more energy on the no-breakfast day than on the breakfast day. Although the quality of dietary selections reflected in the energy and macronutrient density of a day's intake did not differ between the breakfast and the no-breakfast day, breakfast skippers may need encouragement to consume fruit and whole grains at other eating episodes. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26178722/Within_person_comparison_of_eating_behaviors_time_of_eating_and_dietary_intake_on_days_with_and_without_breakfast:_NHANES_2005_2010_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.115.110262 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -