Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Degree of Trauma Differs for Major Osteoporotic Fracture Events in Older Men Versus Older Women.
J Bone Miner Res 2016; 31(1):204-7JB

Abstract

To examine the degree of trauma in major osteoporotic fractures (MOF) in men versus women, we used data from 15,698 adults aged ≥65 years enrolled in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study (5994 men) and the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF) (9704 women). Participants were contacted tri-annually to ascertain incident fractures, which were confirmed by radiographic reports and coded according to degree of self-reported trauma. Trauma was classified as low (fall from ≤ standing height; fall on stairs, steps, or curb; minimal trauma other than fall [coughing, turning over]); moderate (collisions with objects during normal activity without associated fall); or high (fall from > standing height; severe trauma [motor vehicle accident, assault]). MOF included hip, clinical vertebral, wrist, and humerus fractures. Mean fracture follow-up was 9.1 years in SOF and 8.7 years in MrOS. A total of 14.6% of the MOF in men versus 6.3% of the MOF in women were classified as high trauma (p < 0.001); men versus women more often experienced fractures resulting from severe trauma as well as from fall > standing height. High-trauma fractures were more significantly common in men versus women at the hip (p = 0.002) and wrist (p < 0.001) but not at the spine or humerus. Among participants with MOF, the odds ratio of a fracture related to high-trauma fracture among men versus women was 3.12 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.70-5.71) after adjustment for traditional risk factors. Findings were similar in analyses limited to participants with hip fractures (odds ratio [OR] = 3.34, 95% CI 1.04-10.67) and those with wrist fracture (OR = 5.68, 95% CI 2.03-15.85). Among community-dwelling older adults, MOF are more likely to be related to high trauma in men than in women. These findings are not explained by sex differences in conventional risk factors and may reflect a greater propensity among men to engage in risky behavior. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. Center for Chronic Disease Outcomes Research, VA Health Care System, Minneapolis, MN, USA.California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, CA, USA.California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, CA, USA.Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. Center for Chronic Disease Outcomes Research, VA Health Care System, Minneapolis, MN, USA.Park Nicollet Clinic, St. Louis Park, MN, USA. Division of Health Policy and Management, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.Bone and Mineral Unit, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA.Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.Department of Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26178795

Citation

Ensrud, Kristine E., et al. "Degree of Trauma Differs for Major Osteoporotic Fracture Events in Older Men Versus Older Women." Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 31, no. 1, 2016, pp. 204-7.
Ensrud KE, Blackwell TL, Cawthon PM, et al. Degree of Trauma Differs for Major Osteoporotic Fracture Events in Older Men Versus Older Women. J Bone Miner Res. 2016;31(1):204-7.
Ensrud, K. E., Blackwell, T. L., Cawthon, P. M., Bauer, D. C., Fink, H. A., Schousboe, J. T., ... Mackey, D. C. (2016). Degree of Trauma Differs for Major Osteoporotic Fracture Events in Older Men Versus Older Women. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, 31(1), pp. 204-7. doi:10.1002/jbmr.2589.
Ensrud KE, et al. Degree of Trauma Differs for Major Osteoporotic Fracture Events in Older Men Versus Older Women. J Bone Miner Res. 2016;31(1):204-7. PubMed PMID: 26178795.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Degree of Trauma Differs for Major Osteoporotic Fracture Events in Older Men Versus Older Women. AU - Ensrud,Kristine E, AU - Blackwell,Terri L, AU - Cawthon,Peggy M, AU - Bauer,Douglas C, AU - Fink,Howard A, AU - Schousboe,John T, AU - Black,Dennis M, AU - Orwoll,Eric S, AU - Kado,Deborah M, AU - Cauley,Jane A, AU - Mackey,Dawn C, AU - ,, Y1 - 2015/08/03/ PY - 2015/05/15/received PY - 2015/07/01/revised PY - 2015/07/06/accepted PY - 2015/7/17/entrez PY - 2015/7/17/pubmed PY - 2016/11/1/medline KW - DEGREE OF TRAUMA KW - FRACTURES KW - MEN KW - OLDER ADULTS KW - WOMEN SP - 204 EP - 7 JF - Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research JO - J. Bone Miner. Res. VL - 31 IS - 1 N2 - To examine the degree of trauma in major osteoporotic fractures (MOF) in men versus women, we used data from 15,698 adults aged ≥65 years enrolled in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study (5994 men) and the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF) (9704 women). Participants were contacted tri-annually to ascertain incident fractures, which were confirmed by radiographic reports and coded according to degree of self-reported trauma. Trauma was classified as low (fall from ≤ standing height; fall on stairs, steps, or curb; minimal trauma other than fall [coughing, turning over]); moderate (collisions with objects during normal activity without associated fall); or high (fall from > standing height; severe trauma [motor vehicle accident, assault]). MOF included hip, clinical vertebral, wrist, and humerus fractures. Mean fracture follow-up was 9.1 years in SOF and 8.7 years in MrOS. A total of 14.6% of the MOF in men versus 6.3% of the MOF in women were classified as high trauma (p < 0.001); men versus women more often experienced fractures resulting from severe trauma as well as from fall > standing height. High-trauma fractures were more significantly common in men versus women at the hip (p = 0.002) and wrist (p < 0.001) but not at the spine or humerus. Among participants with MOF, the odds ratio of a fracture related to high-trauma fracture among men versus women was 3.12 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.70-5.71) after adjustment for traditional risk factors. Findings were similar in analyses limited to participants with hip fractures (odds ratio [OR] = 3.34, 95% CI 1.04-10.67) and those with wrist fracture (OR = 5.68, 95% CI 2.03-15.85). Among community-dwelling older adults, MOF are more likely to be related to high trauma in men than in women. These findings are not explained by sex differences in conventional risk factors and may reflect a greater propensity among men to engage in risky behavior. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. SN - 1523-4681 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26178795/Degree_of_Trauma_Differs_for_Major_Osteoporotic_Fracture_Events_in_Older_Men_Versus_Older_Women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.2589 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -