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Paucity of evidence for a relationship between long-chain omega-3 fatty acid intake and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review.
Nutr Rev. 2015 Sep; 73(9):612-23.NR

Abstract

CONTEXT

The anti-inflammatory activity of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) has been established in several chronic inflammatory diseases but has yet to be demonstrated in inflammatory lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this systematic review was to investigate, using PRISMA guidelines, the relationship between the intake of long-chain n-3 PUFAs and the prevalence, severity, and health outcomes of COPD.

DATA SOURCES

Eight health databases and the World Health Organization's international clinical trial registry were searched for relevant studies.

STUDY SELECTION

Experimental or observational studies that were published in English and that assessed long-chain n-3 PUFA intake (by determining habitual consumption and/or tissue levels) in adults with COPD were included.

DATA EXTRACTION

Publication demographics, participant characteristics, type of intervention or exposure, long-chain n-3 PUFA intake, pulmonary function, COPD mortality, and COPD severity were independently extracted from each article by 2 authors using a prospectively designed data extraction tool.

DATA SYNTHESIS

All 11 of the studies included in the review were observational. Approximately equal numbers of studies reported significant (n = 6, 5 inverse) relationships or no significant relationships (n = 5) between either consumption of long-chain n-3 PUFAs or levels of long-chain n-3 PUFAS in tissue and a COPD outcome.

CONCLUSIONS

Current evidence of a relationship between long-chain n-3 PUFA intake and COPD is limited and conflicting, with studies having wide methodological variation.

REGISTRATION NUMBER

PROSPERO 2013:CRD42013004085.

Authors+Show Affiliations

A.S. Fulton and A.M. Coates are with the School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. M.T. Williams is with the School of Population Health, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. P.R.C. Howe is with the Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, School of Biomedical Sciences & Pharmacy, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia. A.M. Hill is with the School of Pharmacy & Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. A.S. Fulton, A.M. Hill, M.T. Williams, P.R.C. Howe, and A.M. Coates are with the Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), Sansom Institute for Health Research, Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.A.S. Fulton and A.M. Coates are with the School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. M.T. Williams is with the School of Population Health, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. P.R.C. Howe is with the Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, School of Biomedical Sciences & Pharmacy, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia. A.M. Hill is with the School of Pharmacy & Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. A.S. Fulton, A.M. Hill, M.T. Williams, P.R.C. Howe, and A.M. Coates are with the Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), Sansom Institute for Health Research, Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.A.S. Fulton and A.M. Coates are with the School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. M.T. Williams is with the School of Population Health, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. P.R.C. Howe is with the Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, School of Biomedical Sciences & Pharmacy, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia. A.M. Hill is with the School of Pharmacy & Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. A.S. Fulton, A.M. Hill, M.T. Williams, P.R.C. Howe, and A.M. Coates are with the Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), Sansom Institute for Health Research, Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.A.S. Fulton and A.M. Coates are with the School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. M.T. Williams is with the School of Population Health, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. P.R.C. Howe is with the Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, School of Biomedical Sciences & Pharmacy, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia. A.M. Hill is with the School of Pharmacy & Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. A.S. Fulton, A.M. Hill, M.T. Williams, P.R.C. Howe, and A.M. Coates are with the Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), Sansom Institute for Health Research, Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.A.S. Fulton and A.M. Coates are with the School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. M.T. Williams is with the School of Population Health, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. P.R.C. Howe is with the Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, School of Biomedical Sciences & Pharmacy, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia. A.M. Hill is with the School of Pharmacy & Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. A.S. Fulton, A.M. Hill, M.T. Williams, P.R.C. Howe, and A.M. Coates are with the Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), Sansom Institute for Health Research, Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. alison.coates@unisa.edu.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26185126

Citation

Fulton, Ashley S., et al. "Paucity of Evidence for a Relationship Between Long-chain Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intake and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: a Systematic Review." Nutrition Reviews, vol. 73, no. 9, 2015, pp. 612-23.
Fulton AS, Hill AM, Williams MT, et al. Paucity of evidence for a relationship between long-chain omega-3 fatty acid intake and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review. Nutr Rev. 2015;73(9):612-23.
Fulton, A. S., Hill, A. M., Williams, M. T., Howe, P. R., & Coates, A. M. (2015). Paucity of evidence for a relationship between long-chain omega-3 fatty acid intake and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review. Nutrition Reviews, 73(9), 612-23. https://doi.org/10.1093/nutrit/nuv017
Fulton AS, et al. Paucity of Evidence for a Relationship Between Long-chain Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intake and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: a Systematic Review. Nutr Rev. 2015;73(9):612-23. PubMed PMID: 26185126.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Paucity of evidence for a relationship between long-chain omega-3 fatty acid intake and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review. AU - Fulton,Ashley S, AU - Hill,Alison M, AU - Williams,Marie T, AU - Howe,Peter R C, AU - Coates,Alison M, Y1 - 2015/07/15/ PY - 2015/7/18/entrez PY - 2015/7/18/pubmed PY - 2016/3/19/medline KW - COPD KW - LCn-3 PUFA KW - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease KW - long-chain n-3 fatty acid KW - polyunsaturated fatty acid KW - systematic review. SP - 612 EP - 23 JF - Nutrition reviews JO - Nutr. Rev. VL - 73 IS - 9 N2 - CONTEXT: The anti-inflammatory activity of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) has been established in several chronic inflammatory diseases but has yet to be demonstrated in inflammatory lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic review was to investigate, using PRISMA guidelines, the relationship between the intake of long-chain n-3 PUFAs and the prevalence, severity, and health outcomes of COPD. DATA SOURCES: Eight health databases and the World Health Organization's international clinical trial registry were searched for relevant studies. STUDY SELECTION: Experimental or observational studies that were published in English and that assessed long-chain n-3 PUFA intake (by determining habitual consumption and/or tissue levels) in adults with COPD were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Publication demographics, participant characteristics, type of intervention or exposure, long-chain n-3 PUFA intake, pulmonary function, COPD mortality, and COPD severity were independently extracted from each article by 2 authors using a prospectively designed data extraction tool. DATA SYNTHESIS: All 11 of the studies included in the review were observational. Approximately equal numbers of studies reported significant (n = 6, 5 inverse) relationships or no significant relationships (n = 5) between either consumption of long-chain n-3 PUFAs or levels of long-chain n-3 PUFAS in tissue and a COPD outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Current evidence of a relationship between long-chain n-3 PUFA intake and COPD is limited and conflicting, with studies having wide methodological variation. REGISTRATION NUMBER: PROSPERO 2013:CRD42013004085. SN - 1753-4887 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26185126/Paucity_of_evidence_for_a_relationship_between_long_chain_omega_3_fatty_acid_intake_and_chronic_obstructive_pulmonary_disease:_a_systematic_review_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/nutritionreviews/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/nutrit/nuv017 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -