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Prescription patterns of Chinese herbal products for patients with fractures in Taiwan: A nationwide population-based study.
J Ethnopharmacol. 2015 Sep 15; 173:11-9.JE

Abstract

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE

Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used in the treatment of fracture for thousands of years. However, large-scale surveys examing the utilization of Chinese herbal products (CHPs) for treating fractures and their related symptoms are lacking. This study aimed to investigate the prescription patterns of CHPs among patients with fractures in Taiwan.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

The TCM usage in patients with fractures was analyzed using a sample of one million individuals randomly selected from the National Health Insurance Research Database who were newly diagnosis with fractures in 2001-2008, with a followed-up period through 2010.

RESULTS

We identified 115,327 patients who were newly diagnosed with fractures in the study population. Among them, 4.97% (n=5731) adjunctively utilized TCM for fracture treatment. TCM users were mostly young or middle-aged, female, and resided in highly urbanized areas. With regard to the comorbidities of fractures, TCM users had a lower prevalence of coronary artery disease, chronic obstructive lung disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and stroke than non-TCM users, except for osteoporosis. Shu-jing-huo-xue-tang was the most frequently prescribed Chinese herbal formula, while Rhizoma Drynariae (Gu-sui-bu) was the most common single herb for patients with fractures. The CHPs were found to cover not only bone healing but also fracture-related symptoms. TCM users had lower medical expenditure for hospitalization for the first six months after incident fractures than non-TCM users (1749±2650 versus 2274±3159 US dollars, p<0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS

Our study identified the TCM utilization for patients with fractures in Taiwan. Integration of TCM treatment reduced the medical costs for hospitalization. Further basic research and clinical studies to investigate the mechanism and clinical efficacies of CHPs are warranted.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; Department of Chinese Medicine, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan.School of Post-Baccalaureate Chinese Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan; Department of Chinese Medicine, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan.Health Data Management Office, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.Department of Chinese Medicine, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan.School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; Department of Chinese Medicine, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan.Department of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; Research Center for Chinese Medicine & Acupuncture, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; Department of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; Research Center for Chinese Medicine & Acupuncture, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; Department of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; Research Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26187277

Citation

Liao, Hou-Hsun, et al. "Prescription Patterns of Chinese Herbal Products for Patients With Fractures in Taiwan: a Nationwide Population-based Study." Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol. 173, 2015, pp. 11-9.
Liao HH, Yeh CC, Lin CC, et al. Prescription patterns of Chinese herbal products for patients with fractures in Taiwan: A nationwide population-based study. J Ethnopharmacol. 2015;173:11-9.
Liao, H. H., Yeh, C. C., Lin, C. C., Chen, B. C., Yeh, M. H., Chang, K. M., Sun, M. F., & Yen, H. R. (2015). Prescription patterns of Chinese herbal products for patients with fractures in Taiwan: A nationwide population-based study. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 173, 11-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2015.07.014
Liao HH, et al. Prescription Patterns of Chinese Herbal Products for Patients With Fractures in Taiwan: a Nationwide Population-based Study. J Ethnopharmacol. 2015 Sep 15;173:11-9. PubMed PMID: 26187277.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prescription patterns of Chinese herbal products for patients with fractures in Taiwan: A nationwide population-based study. AU - Liao,Hou-Hsun, AU - Yeh,Chia-Chou, AU - Lin,Che-Chen, AU - Chen,Bor-Chyuan, AU - Yeh,Ming-Hsien, AU - Chang,Kuo-Ming, AU - Sun,Mao-Feng, AU - Yen,Hung-Rong, Y1 - 2015/07/14/ PY - 2015/04/20/received PY - 2015/07/09/revised PY - 2015/07/13/accepted PY - 2015/7/19/entrez PY - 2015/7/19/pubmed PY - 2016/8/9/medline KW - Complementary and alternative medicine KW - Fracture KW - National health insurance research database KW - Rhizoma Drynariae KW - Shu-jing-huo-xue-tang KW - Traditional Chinese medicine SP - 11 EP - 9 JF - Journal of ethnopharmacology JO - J Ethnopharmacol VL - 173 N2 - ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used in the treatment of fracture for thousands of years. However, large-scale surveys examing the utilization of Chinese herbal products (CHPs) for treating fractures and their related symptoms are lacking. This study aimed to investigate the prescription patterns of CHPs among patients with fractures in Taiwan. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The TCM usage in patients with fractures was analyzed using a sample of one million individuals randomly selected from the National Health Insurance Research Database who were newly diagnosis with fractures in 2001-2008, with a followed-up period through 2010. RESULTS: We identified 115,327 patients who were newly diagnosed with fractures in the study population. Among them, 4.97% (n=5731) adjunctively utilized TCM for fracture treatment. TCM users were mostly young or middle-aged, female, and resided in highly urbanized areas. With regard to the comorbidities of fractures, TCM users had a lower prevalence of coronary artery disease, chronic obstructive lung disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and stroke than non-TCM users, except for osteoporosis. Shu-jing-huo-xue-tang was the most frequently prescribed Chinese herbal formula, while Rhizoma Drynariae (Gu-sui-bu) was the most common single herb for patients with fractures. The CHPs were found to cover not only bone healing but also fracture-related symptoms. TCM users had lower medical expenditure for hospitalization for the first six months after incident fractures than non-TCM users (1749±2650 versus 2274±3159 US dollars, p<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Our study identified the TCM utilization for patients with fractures in Taiwan. Integration of TCM treatment reduced the medical costs for hospitalization. Further basic research and clinical studies to investigate the mechanism and clinical efficacies of CHPs are warranted. SN - 1872-7573 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26187277/Prescription_patterns_of_Chinese_herbal_products_for_patients_with_fractures_in_Taiwan:_A_nationwide_population_based_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378-8741(15)30031-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -